• Last Updated:
  • Apr 10th, 2020 2:15 pm
[OP]
Jr. Member
Nov 6, 2006
142 posts
17 upvotes

Range Hood advice

Hi all,

We recently did a fairly large renovation to our house and opened up the kitchen area in the process. Instead of the old "L" shaped kitchen, we now have a 17' long kitchen in an open concept main floor area. There are no walls.

We've already ordered all our appliances and awaiting delivery (delayed because of covid). The cooktop is a 30" KitchenAid as unit. I believe total BTU is 50,000.

I'm not in the process of looking for range hoods. I'm wondering the following:
  • Do I need a more powerful range hood because of the open space (no walls)?
  • I have exactly 10" height for the under cabinet range hood...is that enough space for a powerful enough hood? It's not too late for me to swap out the Ikea cabinet with a shorter one
  • Ikea cabinets/counter is 26" deep including the 2" granite overhand, the cooktop is built into the granite and 21" deep, will a 24" deep range hood be enough coverage?
  • How many CFMs should I be looking at?
All that said, I came across this one:
https://victoryrangehoods.com/shop/rang ... -hood.html

It seems like a nice, simple design. I'm not looking for anything too crazy, but would like it move air/smells well. The exhaust pipe run will be short, with just a 90 degree elbow straight out to the side of the house (about 8" horizontal run).

thoughts? suggestions?

Thanks
5 replies
Sr. Member
May 21, 2015
910 posts
443 upvotes
Sarnia, ON
I bought this Broan Elite last year when we got our new induction stove . Very happy with it, it works really well. 3 speeds and even on the high speed it isn't obnoxiously noisy. Dual fans. 3 light settings (LED). Our livingroom/dining/kitchen is all beneath a 16 foot cathedral ceiling , so pretty open as well. It captures all smoke and smells on speed 2 & 3 and you can actually feel it sucking the air out as you stand in front of the stove cooking. It can be top or back vented. I have it going straight out the back thru the wall. It cost more than I liked but it's a huge improvement over the cheap exhaust fan that was there before . Your text to link here...
Deal Fanatic
Dec 6, 2006
5111 posts
1457 upvotes
Toronto
Seems overly complicated with all those calculation. Just get the usual biggest one, i.e. 900 CFM and be done with it. They all have multiple speed settings anyway.

I got a 900CFM one. For slow steaming/boiling with less smell, lowest setting is fine. Most everyday cooking using mid setting is sufficient. But when having to fry or deep-fry, you'd for sure appreciate that 900CFM max speed.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Oct 15, 2007
5171 posts
2592 upvotes
boyohboy wrote: Seems overly complicated with all those calculation. Just get the usual biggest one, i.e. 900 CFM and be done with it. They all have multiple speed settings anyway.

I got a 900CFM one. For slow steaming/boiling with less smell, lowest setting is fine. Most everyday cooking using mid setting is sufficient. But when having to fry or deep-fry, you'd for sure appreciate that 900CFM max speed.
Advice such as this should not be considered without first determining whether or not make up air will be required
Last edited by Red_Army on Apr 10th, 2020 2:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Everything has been said before, but since nobody listens we have to keep going back and beginning all over again. - Andre Gide
Member
Apr 19, 2018
251 posts
67 upvotes
Scarborough
I was in a similar situation to you. Here is my advise
- Ensure that your range hood covers your entire cooking area
- CFM levels are not regulated. What that means is that you should stick to known brands. I learned the hard way and went with a windster hood which is garbage instead of the Sakura my family has used for over 15 yeares
- Do not use flexible duct piping for your venting as it it will A) Make your rangehood noisy B) Oil will get trapped in the ridges which is a hazard C) Decrease the effectiveness of the rangehood. Always use the metal type of ducting i think it's called 9 gauge
- Stick to a rangehood that is a minimum of 900 cfm as it will come handy when you are frying or cooking a curry which can stink up your house
- If you do decide to get a rangehood that has 700 CFM or higher, increase your vent size leading to the outside of your home to atleast 7-8 inches. And ensure to get a vent with a spring loaded flap to avoid cold air coming into the house from the vent. It's hard to find these so you might have to find it from the shops that sell range hoods. Many of the chinese shops have it.
- My personal reco would be to stick to the Sakura brand. You will not be disappointed. My family has the M3000 and it is a beast.
Don't worry be happy - Bob

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