Careers

RCMP Depot Cadet versus FBI Academy New Agent Comparison

  • Last Updated:
  • Jul 26th, 2017 2:47 am
[OP]
Newbie
Jul 8, 2017
18 posts
10 upvotes

RCMP Depot Cadet versus FBI Academy New Agent Comparison

Would anyone care to comment on the differences and quality of the FBI Academy New Agent versus RCMP Depot Cadet Recruit Training? In terms of recruiting and training?

Summary:

Currently, RCMP has no competency based interview, no initial physical fitness testing, and the entrance exam can be waived for anyone with a 2 year college diploma or higher. The training seems far more boot-camp paramilitary like with lots of drill (inspections of beds, closets, drawers for dust, uniforms for ironing and polished boots, etc), and less specialized and technically advanced than FBI. This makes sense as a large chunk of RCMP roles are rural policing or smaller cities and towns, and their entrance requirements for education are high school and there is no shortage of young small town or rural recruits. RCMP has no age requirements either and you don’t have to be a Citizen, so in that sense it is less discriminatory and more equitable than FBI hiring. FBI also requires university degrees from all applicants as well as some professional work experience (this is a big difference from RCMP standards).

Their training programs and facilities seem somewhat similar but with a few differences. RCMP puts a lot of emphasis on drill and regimental military style basic training instruction (think 1930s style forced marching drills and parades). FBI seems more focused on advanced professional type skills training courses. The agency jurisdictions are also very similar (except RCMP does general duty contract policing for provinces and municipalities whereas FBI only handles specialized federal mandates). Almost all RCMP recruits are posted to general duty policing posts under Contract and Aboriginal Policing (the majority in Western Canada). Both have a Top Secret clearance to be accepted.

Due to the sensitive nature of the FBI's missions, all FBI positions require a Top Secret (TS) Security Clearance. Before employees can start work with the FBI, they must undergo an intensive background investigation that includes a polygraph, a drug test, credit and records checks and extensive interviews with former and current colleagues, neighbors, friends, professors, etc., covering the last 10 years.
RCMP does not have a drug test. Reference checks are more limited and over the phone with RCMP. Process wise RCMP only has one phone interview to go over disclosure forms, and one in-person interview (polygraph mostly for disclosures). Recruitment time is also about one year or longer for both agencies.


*****FBI*****


FBI Application Process

Employment Eligibility & Disqualifiers

To be eligible for the FBI Special Agent position, candidates must meet all of the requirements on our Eligibility page, as well as the following:
Be 23 to 36 1/2 years old.*
Meet the Special Agent physical fitness standards.
Possess a minimum of a U.S.-accredited bachelor's degree.**
Have at least three years of full-time work experience.***
Have a valid U.S. driver's license.
Be completely available for assignment anywhere in the FBI's jurisdiction.
* FBI Special Agents must be appointed prior to their 37th birthday. Because of the lengthy application and hiring process, the FBI does not normally accept applications from applicants older than 36 and a half. Although we accept applicants up to age 36 and a half, the hiring process can take a year or more. If at any point during the hiring process, it becomes apparent that an applicant cannot be appointed prior to their 37th birthday, an age waiver will be required. Waivers are only granted in certain circumstances. Please reach out to your field office Applicant Coordinator for more information.
** We accept those who possess an advanced degree from a U.S. accredited college even if your bachelor’s degree is not from a U.S. accredited college.
*** The three-year work experience requirement does not include summer jobs, internships, seasonal positions, temporary employment and/or volunteer work. Certain specified experiences or abilities may waive some (but not all) of the work experience requirement. These include:
A Juris Doctorate (J.D.)
A license as a Certified Public Accountant (CPA)
An advanced degree
For eligible veterans, part-time, internships (paid or unpaid), or Reserve/Guard duty count toward total work experience. Applicants with an advanced degree (master’s and/or doctorate) must have two years of full-time professional work experience.

Education & Skills
While the FBI encourages applicants from all backgrounds to become Special Agents, we are currently looking for Special Agent applicants with skills in the following areas:
Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM)
Foreign Languages
Law
Emergency Medicine
Certified Public Accountants (CPAs)
Attorneys
Engineers
Detectives
Military (specifically Special Forces, Explosives, WMD and Intelligence Experts)
Scientists (lab experience)
Foreign Language(s) speakers
Pilots (helicopter, fixed-wing)

Application Steps and Timeline
Step 0: Meet Physical Requirements & Location Identification
Before applying to the Special Agent position, please ensure you meet all physical requirements as outlined in the Physical Requirements tab above. During the application process, applicants will need to complete a physical fitness evaluation and fitness for duty exam in accordance with the FBI’s Physical Requirements.
Additionally, applicants should find the FBI Field Office nearest them and can contact them via email. Candidates must report to a field office for interviews and testing several times throughout the application process; they are responsible for their own travel to and from the field office.

Step 1: Online Application
In the online application, candidates will be required to answer a variety of suitability questions pertaining to their employment eligibility, as well as submit their scores to a self-Physical Fitness Test (self-PFT).
Once applicants have passed the self-PFT and suitability questions, they should be prepared to provide information about specialized skills, professional experiences and willingness to commit to the FBI and its mission.
The FBI uses a category rating system. You will be evaluated based on the competencies listed below. Please provide, within your resume, written descriptions of situations in which your actions demonstrate the competency and ensure that each competency can be identified in your resume.
Collaboration
Communication
Flexibility/Adaptability
Initiative
Interpersonal Ability
Leadership
Organizing and Planning
Problem Solving/Judgment

Step 2: Phase I & Meet and Greet

Candidates who meet initial pre-screening and eligibility requirements will be invited to take the Phase I Test. If the applicant receives a passing score, they will be invited to a Meet and Greet session at their local field office.
The Phase I Test — a three-hour exam consisting of cognitive, behavioral, and logical reasoning tests.
Meet and Greet Interview — applicants visit their local field office to receive more information about the Special Agent Selection System and are evaluated by the field office’s recruitment team.

Step 3: Phase II

Upon passage of Phase I testing and completion of the Meet and Greet, applicants will be reviewed by an internal FBI hiring board on their ability to meet the current needs of the FBI. After passing this review, candidates will be contacted to complete Phase II, the next step of the SASS.
Upon passing the Phase II tests, candidates must take an official Physical Fitness Test (PFT) – a rigorous physical examination administered in accordance with strict FBI protocol –within 14 days of passing. Upon successful completion of the PFT, candidates are extended a Conditional Appointment Offer (CAO).

Step 4: Background Investigation
After receiving and accepting a CAO, candidates will undergo a thorough FBI background investigation.
All applicants must be eligible to hold an FBI Top Secret security clearance in order to become a Special Agent. This investigation reviews an applicant’s actions, relationships, and experiences over the last 10 years.
The background investigation for Special Agents includes a medical examination, drug testing, and a polygraph test.

Step 5: Basic Field Training Course (BFTC)
Once candidates have successfully completed the background investigation, they will receive orders to report to the FBI Academy in Quantico, Virginia to begin training as New Agent Trainees (NATs). This Basic Field Training Course (BFTC) lasts 21 weeks, and candidates are typically notified two to four weeks in advance of their class date. NATs must successfully complete all portions of the BFTC in order to be hired as Special Agents.

Step 6: Graduation
Upon successful graduation from the BFTC, Special Agents report to their assigned Field Office on their specified date. During the first two years on duty, Special Agents spend 18 months in a probationary period in which they gain hands-on experience working in different specialties within the FBI’s jurisdiction.
Source: https://www.fbijobs.gov/career-paths/special-agents

Firearms Training:
All new agent trainees currently receive training with a Bureau-issued pistol, carbine, and shotgun. To demonstrate proficiency, trainees must successfully qualify with both the pistol and carbine, and participate in live-fire familiarization with the shotgun. The present firearms curriculum is comprised of 28 sessions totaling 110 hours of instruction, and includes approximately 5,000 rounds of ammunition.
Source: https://www.fbi.gov/services/training-a ... t-training

Time: New agent training lasts approximately 20 weeks.

Location: Quantico, Virginia (near Washington DC).

Fitness Test Benchmarks: Agent trainees get a variety of fitness training and must pass a standardized physical fitness test (PFT). To pass the test, trainees must achieve a minimum cumulative score of 12 points with at least one point in each of four areas: sit-ups in one minute, timed 300-meter sprint, push-ups (untimed), and timed 1.5-mile run.

Special Visits: As part of their ethics training, students tour the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. to learn what can happen when law enforcement loses its core values. Students also visit the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial in Washington to gain perspective on civil equality.

Training


Operational Skills
This concentration includes everything from defensive tactics to surveillance, from physical fitness to tactical driving. Defensive tactics training focuses on boxing and grappling, handcuffing, control holds, searches of subjects, weapon retention, and disarming techniques. Safe driving techniques are provided at the Academy’s Tactical Emergency Vehicle Operations Center.

Trainees also receive more than 90 hours of instruction and practical exercises focused on tactics, operations planning, operation of cooperating witnesses and informants, physical and electronic surveillance, undercover operations, and the development and dissemination of intelligence. At Hogan’s Alley, trainees conduct interviews, plan and carry out an arrest, perform daytime and nighttime surveillance, and practice street survival techniques taught by their instructors. Real-life exercises include a bank robbery, a kidnapping, an assault on a federal officer, and both compliant and armed and dangerous arrest scenarios. Trainees use paint guns to test their tactical skills.

Case Exercises
We use case exercises to test the trainees’ mettle in real-life situations and mirror what they will experience in the field. For example, the students are given an integrated case scenario that starts with a tip and culminates in the arrests of multiple subjects. The investigation plays out on the streets of Hogan’s Alley, our mock town at the Academy that features hired actors playing criminals and terrorists. Another practical exercise—called Capstone—uses culturally diverse role players in a terrorism and intelligence-driven scenario. Trainees also get the chance to present evidence in a moot court.

Class Leadership and Instructors
A select group of supervisory special agents from the Training Division serve as class supervisors for a given session. A rotating pair of special agents from our field offices—called field counselors—are present at the Academy with the new agent trainees, providing advice, counsel, and support. The students are trained by full-time instructors from the Training Division and by experts in counterterrorism, intelligence, forensics, and other areas from across the Bureau. Over the course of the session, our New Agents Training Unit evaluates the trainees to make sure that they are ready to become FBI special agents.

Graduation
After the trainees successfully complete the training program and are judged to be models of the FBI’s core values, they are ready to graduate. At a special ceremony attended by the students’ family and friends, the FBI Director or his representative swears in the new agents and presents them with their badges and credentials. The class spokesperson, chosen by classmates, addresses the recruits and their families on the challenges faced and obstacles overcome during the training. One new agent is selected by his or her peers and staff to receive the Director’s Leadership Award, and honors are also handed out for top achievers in academics, firearms, and physical fitness.
As they leave the Academy, the new agents pick up their firearms and ammunition. They are now ready to head out to their first office of assignment and begin work as FBI special agents. They will return to the Academy often for specialized training and refresher courses throughout their careers.


*****RCMP*****


RCMP Cadet Constable

Time: When you are accepted as a Cadet with the RCMP, you will be assigned to a troop of 32 Cadets. You will then begin an extensive 26-week training program at Depot.

Location: Regina, Saskatchewan.

Special Visits:
Visit and tour Aboriginal Reserve.

Fitness Test Benchmarks: Cadets will be required to successfully complete the PARE within the first two weeks at Depot. Cadets should complete the first two stations in 4 minutes and 45 seconds or less. At the conclusion of the Cadet Training Program, Cadets must complete the first two stations in 4 minutes or less in order to graduate.

Cadet Training Program

Cadets live at Depot in individual rooms (semi-private and shared communal bathrooms). Being an RCMP police officer demands a high level of self-discipline and RCMP police officers must always maintain control of their actions. To help recruits acquire this skill, a paramilitary environment exists. This model is an effective way to learn how to deal positively with uncomfortable situations and to reinforce teamwork. A typical day lasts from 6 a.m. until 4:30 p.m., and there are also program-related duties after hours.

Source: http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/depot/journal/index-eng.htm
http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/en/cadet-training

Application:
The RCMP is seeking highly motivated team players who possess strong leadership abilities, from a wide range of backgrounds. All applicants are expected to reflect the core values of the RCMP (integrity, honesty, professionalism, compassion, respect and accountability).
During your application process you will be required to provide certain documents and agree to certain conditions.
The length of our recruiting process varies for each individual applicant. Factors such as, how quickly and accurately an applicant completes and returns their selection package forms, the number of locations the individual has lived, and if the applicant has lived abroad can impact the time needed to process an application.

Application requirements:
To apply as a police officer of the RCMP you must:
Be a Canadian citizen or have permanent resident status in Canada. Individuals with permanent resident status must have resided in Canada for the last 10 consecutive years.
Be at least 19 years of age at the time of engagement
Be proficient in English and/or French
Possess a valid, unrestricted driver's licence
Possess a Canadian secondary school (high school) diploma or equivalent
Meet the health and psychological standards
Meet the vision standards
Meet the hearing standards
Meet the necessary level of physical abilities
Be prepared to carry a firearm and to use it or any other necessary physical force
Be willing to spend 26 weeks at the RCMP Academy (Depot) in Regina, Saskatchewan
Be willing to relocate anywhere within Canada or be pre-posted to British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, or Manitoba.
Be willing to work shift work including weekends and holidays
Be aware of expectations with regards to tattoos and piercings
Source: http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/en/qualificat ... quirements

How to apply:
Before you apply, you need to:
meet the qualifications and requirements
have two (2) medical assessments completed: vision and hearing.
Costs for vision and hearing exams are the responsibility of the applicant and will not be reimbursed.
Once you have successfully completed vision and hearing exams and you have the forms confirming that you meet the minimum requirements, you can proceed with your online application. Please retain your completed forms until step three (3) of the application process.

Submit an online application
All applicants must apply online. RCMP police officer job openings are posted on the Government of Canada's job search bank. You can access them by searching "RCMP" under "Job title" and looking under the "Jobs open to the public" tab in the search results.
You will need to create an account and complete your online application.
Be aware that, if you answer "no" to any of the qualifications or requirements, or do not have your pre-application assessments and forms completed, you risk being rejected from the recruitment process and will not be permitted to reapply for a period of six (6) months.

Write the RCMP Entrance Exam
If your application is successful you will be contacted by the RCMP to register for the Entrance Exam. Exam sessions are held in a number of cities and towns throughout the year.
If you indicated on your online application that you possess a Bachelor's degree or a college diploma (minimum two-year) from a recognized post-secondary institution, you will not be required to write the exam and will move on to the next step in the process. You will be required to provide your university or college transcripts during the application process.
Note: Before submitting your application, review the Entrance Exam page for details on what is considered "recognized post-secondary institution" to determine if you are eligible for this exemption.

Forms completion
Should you be selected to continue in the process, you will be instructed to download various forms that must be completed and returned by a specified date. You will also be required to obtain various personal documents, such as high school transcripts, statement of driving record, and fingerprints.

Complete the Pre-Employment Polygraph Examination

This stage is intended to review the questions and responses you provided in your Applicant Questionnaire (in step 3) and verify honesty and integrity.

Have a health assessment
A full health assessment, including full medical and psychological exams will be conducted by RCMP designated physicians. Cost of medical and psychological exams are absorbed by the RCMP.

Undergo a field investigation and security clearance
A thorough investigation into your background is conducted to help assess your character. If successful, a security clearance will be issued.
Source: http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/en/how-to-apply

Firearms Training: pistol and shotgun at indoor range.

Case Exercises: Similar but only basic introductory general duty policing topics. Nothing technically or technologically advanced.

Class Leadership and Instructors: Some instructors may be posted to Depot as a transition before retirement, or sometimes even as an administrative measure away from public or operational postings.

Graduation:
Upon successful completion of the Cadet Training Program, generally you will be hired as an RCMP police officer. Your training will continue throughout your first posting, where you will be coached and mentored by experienced police officers as part of a six-month Field Coaching Program. During this time, you will perform everyday police duties under the supervision of your Field Coach.
Last edited by MsSPECTRE on Jul 21st, 2017 5:35 pm, edited 11 times in total.
7 replies
Newbie
Jan 7, 2009
28 posts
29 upvotes
Toronto
MsSPECTRE wrote:
Summary:

Currently, RCMP has no competency based interview, no initial physical fitness testing, and the entrance exam can be waived for anyone with a 2 year college diploma or higher. The training seems far more boot-camp paramilitary like with lots of drill (inspections of beds, closets, drawers for dust, uniforms for ironing and polished boots, etc), and less specialized and technically advanced than FBI. This makes sense as a large chunk of RCMP roles are rural policing or smaller cities and towns, and their entrance requirements for education are high school and there is no shortage of young small town or rural recruits. RCMP has no age requirements either and you don’t have to be a Citizen, so in that sense it is less discriminatory and more equitable than FBI hiring. FBI also requires university degrees from all applicants as well as some professional work experience (this is a big difference from RCMP standards).
I'm not with the RCMP but I am a police officer in Canada, I do have friends who are RCMP or just entering the RCMP Depot Program.

You pretty much answered your own question with the above paragraph;

The FBI has never been nor will it ever be a uniformed Police Service they are Criminal Investigators as such they don't need to conform to the para-military rigid structure that governs other police forces or services around the world. The RCMP is a Uniformed Police service, as such they follow the more para-military structure and with it the discipline, tradition and standards.

FBI Agents will never have to don a uniform whereas plainclothes RCMP officers can still be transferred back to a Uniformed duty within the force.

If you take a look at the "ranking" of the FBI it falls in line with any other corporate job; contrast that to a Police Service and it becomes much more para-military.
Deal Addict
Apr 30, 2011
3633 posts
444 upvotes
RICHMOND HILL
Well after all the RCMP is given the name Gendarmerie in French so it should have a paramilitary training and structure.
Deal Fanatic
Jul 13, 2012
8501 posts
1049 upvotes
Occupied Ottawa
Comm wrote: I'm not with the RCMP but I am a police officer in Canada, I do have friends who are RCMP or just entering the RCMP Depot Program.

You pretty much answered your own question with the above paragraph;

The FBI has never been nor will it ever be a uniformed Police Service they are Criminal Investigators as such they don't need to conform to the para-military rigid structure that governs other police forces or services around the world. The RCMP is a Uniformed Police service, as such they follow the more para-military structure and with it the discipline, tradition and standards.

FBI Agents will never have to don a uniform whereas plainclothes RCMP officers can still be transferred back to a Uniformed duty within the force.

If you take a look at the "ranking" of the FBI it falls in line with any other corporate job; contrast that to a Police Service and it becomes much more para-military.
I am not a police officer but know a few people who are in the RCMP or are in the process. They've said that the RCMP is slowly moving away from the paramilitary environment and more toward a "civilian" training environment. Part of this is due to lawsu.... er...."external pressures", but also because the demographics of cadets is changing. No longer is the average cadet 20 years old, single, never held a serious job, his mom still does his laundry, etc. Now, the average cadet is in his late 20s or early 30s, married with children or in a serious relationship, has a mortgage, etc.
Newbie
Jan 7, 2009
28 posts
29 upvotes
Toronto
ConsoleWatcher wrote: I am not a police officer but know a few people who are in the RCMP or are in the process. They've said that the RCMP is slowly moving away from the paramilitary environment and more toward a "civilian" training environment. Part of this is due to lawsu.... er...."external pressures", but also because the demographics of cadets is changing. No longer is the average cadet 20 years old, single, never held a serious job, his mom still does his laundry, etc. Now, the average cadet is in his late 20s or early 30s, married with children or in a serious relationship, has a mortgage, etc.

Heard that as well; but any police service is still considered a para-military organization in large part of the ranking structure. I have heard they are moving away from the boot-camp atmosphere and making it more in line with the rest of us Provincial and Municipal officers.
Member
Jan 10, 2017
235 posts
112 upvotes
Wait, you're telling me an accountant can be an FBI agent?

I'm interested in this. I will throw away everything I have to be an FBI agent.
- How much do they make?
- What kind of physical exam do they take?
[OP]
Newbie
Jul 8, 2017
18 posts
10 upvotes
@Sociology1

Hopefully you're a dual Citizen or US Citizen. Dual Citizen is fine.

How much are FBI Special Agents paid?

All new FBI Special Agents will earn salaries at the GL-10 [Special Base Rate for LEOs] pay grade. Applicants with no prior government service will earn a salary at the GL-10, step 1 pay level. Applicants with prior government service (including FBI professional staff) may be eligible to receive higher steps that are commensurate with their highest previous pay, but they will not enter at higher grades.

During the Basic Field Training Course (BFTC), New Agent Trainees (NATs) will earn GL-10 salaries, plus availability pay (AVP), which is 25 percent of their base pay, plus locality pay for the Washington, D.C. area. Upon graduation from BFTC and assignment to their first Field Offices, new SAs will be paid at the GL-10 pay level, plus AVP, plus the locality pay that applies to their first offices of assignment. OPM’s website contains current salary tables to allow employees to determine the locality pay rates for various areas of the country. Part-time Special Agents do not receive availability pay.

As an FBI employee, a Special Agent also receives a variety of benefits, including group health and life insurance programs, vacation and sick pay and a full retirement plan.

GL-10, step 1 pay level: 49218+ , plus availability pay (AVP), plus the locality pay that applies to their first offices of assignment
Source:
https://www.opm.gov/policy-data-oversig ... t-officer/
https://www.fbijobs.gov/career-paths/special-agents

Old Info: "The base salary for a newly assigned agent in 2014 was $46,229, according to the federal Office of Personnel Management website. With locality pay added, a newly assigned agent would have an adjusted salary between $52,007 and $59,496. When availability pay is calculated on the adjusted salary, the salary range for a new agent would be $65,008 to $74,370. New agents are also eligible for a relocation bonus in some circumstances, so for the first year only, an agent might earn an additional $22,000, according to the FBI Careers website. An experienced agent with long tenure at GS 15 step 4 could earn a base salary of $130,810, plus locality and availability differentials."
Source:
http://work.chron.com/much-fbi-agent-ma ... 28711.html

What are the opportunities for promotions and pay increases?

Special Agents enter as GL-10 employees on the law enforcement government pay scale and can advance to the GS-13 grade level in a field, non-supervisory role. Special Agents can thereafter qualify for promotion to supervisory, management and executive positions to grades GS-14 and GS-15, as well as to the FBI Senior Executive Service.

Estimated Pay Range: FBI Special Agent adjusted salaries at FBI can range from $71,000-$175,000. FBI Director is around $200k. The average FBI Special Agent salary is about $120k with the highest being qualified specialized/technical positions and supervisory/management.

Physical Fitness Test (PFT) Guide
https://www.fbijobs.gov/sites/default/f ... _Guide.pdf

The Physical Test and Requirements

The Physical Fitness Test (PFT)

The PFT consists of four events in the following order, with no more than five minutes of rest between each event. A passing score requires a cumulative 12 points*, with at least 1 point in each of the four events. Click here for our PFT guide and scoring scales.

Maximum number of continuous sit-ups in one minute.
Timed 300-meter sprint.
Maximum number of continuous push-ups (untimed).
Timed 1.5 mile run.
*Tactical Recruitment Program (TRP) applicants also must do pull-ups as part of the test and achieve a total of 20 points, with at least 1 point in each of five events. However, meeting these physical requirements will not automatically qualify candidates as eligible TRP applicants. For more information on the Tactical Recruitment Program, view the Other Opportunities for Special Agents section

Source:
https://www.fbijobs.gov/career-paths/special-agents
Last edited by MsSPECTRE on Jul 26th, 2017 1:52 am, edited 5 times in total.
[OP]
Newbie
Jul 8, 2017
18 posts
10 upvotes
@ ConsoleWatcher

I am not a police officer but know a few people who are in the RCMP or are in the process. They've said that the RCMP is slowly moving away from the paramilitary environment and more toward a "civilian" training environment. Part of this is due to lawsu.... er...."external pressures", but also because the demographics of cadets is changing. No longer is the average cadet 20 years old, single, never held a serious job, his mom still does his laundry, etc. Now, the average cadet is in his late 20s or early 30s, married with children or in a serious relationship, has a mortgage, etc.
...

Minor public relations oriented or cosmetical changes should not be confused with real fundamental changes. The average age is not early 30s, no way. The average age might be in the mid to late 20s because you have some older people skewing it higher, but that doesn't mean you don't still have a lot of early 20s recruits not long from high school. The average educational level is also very low, otherwise the minimum requirement would not still be a high school diploma. Probably no more than 40% of applicants have post-secondary (generally college diplomas) and far fewer university degrees. I don't know the exact stats at this time.

As for the paramilitary boot-camp atmosphere, if you look at the rules (see below in detail), living quarters, and emphasis on drill, you will realize that not much has changed. The "regimental" barracks paramilitary training involving discipline and drill is tied to "Tradition" and that will never change anytime soon. Scandals and lawsuits only tweak certain specific aspects, but nothing fundamentally or structurally really changes. The only way it will change is if they split Federal Policing and create a brand new federal agency (separate from contract policing) only focused on federal mandates. This would be similar as to how the RCMP Security Service became the civilianized CSIS, but even there it will take another decade or so to escape the RCMP related problems and influences. Also, what highly skilled or educated employee in their right mind would want to join the RCMP when the training is basic and very "regimental", while after there's a very real chance they'll be posted to general duties in a rural location with a high chance of injury (psychological and physical).

Probably the most modern training that you speak of happens at CBSA because it's a newer agency not stuck with "tradition". Their training facilities and curriculum at CBSA College are modern. Plus everyone gets private rooms with private bathrooms and showers, and there are no bed inspections or pointless, demeaning drill.

Information for CBSA Border Services Officers applicants and recruits
Accommodations
During the in-residence phase, all recruits must reside on-site and are provided with a private bedroom and bathroom equipped with a bed and bed sheets, bath towels, closet and dresser, desk and desk chair, small fridge, telephone, television and safe.
Note that other than electric shavers, hair dryers and flat/curling irons, only electrical appliances provided by the CBSA College are permitted in the bedrooms.
A daily bedroom and bathroom cleaning service is provided to all residents. However, residents must keep their room tidy and clean at all times.
Source:
http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/agency-agenc ... c-eng.html


Back to RCMP:
Information Guide to Depot Division
http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/depot/publica ... ex-eng.htm

Cadet Training Program brief overview
http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/depot/ctp-pfc/index-eng.htm

This is from 2014, doubtful anything has changed since:
RCMP Depot: Drill, Deportment and Tactical Unit
Dormitory rules


1. Your dormitory is your home for the duration of your training period. Treat it, and the other troops’ dorms as such.
Do not take a “short cut” through any other troop’s dorm to get to yours.
2. No visitors in your pit area when the curtain is closed.
3. Cross-gender visiting in the pit area is permitted as long as the curtain is open.
4. No visiting permitted after 2300hrs.
5. No Cadet is to enter the pit of another Cadet unless the resident of that pit is present.
Exceptions: During the preparations of the Troop for a "formal inspection" specific duties may be assigned to different Cadets to check
on the order of the garments / boots / etc... to ensure they are all in the same order in every pit for the purpose of inspection.
6. The Big Brother/Sister Troop may be invited to assist a Junior Troop with the initial set up of the dorm and or preparation for a
formal inspection. This is not an open invitation to come over at any time to "assist". Members of the Senior Troop must be invited
by someone fromthe Troop and should leave after providing the necessary assistance.
Enter another dorm only after having been invited to do so. This should be limited to “Troop Business”. You are not to entertain anyone
in your dorm.
It is the responsibility of the troop to keep their dorm/barrack facilities in a good state of tidiness at all times. You must refrain from any
activity which could result in damage or breakage to the building’s furniture and fixtures. Failure to do so will result in disciplinary action.
Any request for repairs should be done via email and forwarded to WorkOrder, Mailbox.
7. Uniform articles of kit and civilian clothing that are hung in the closet will be on hangers. All hangers will be made of the same
material, i.e., all wire, all wood or all plastic. Some of each is not acceptable. You can use two hangers for heavier items such
as your inclement parka judo gi and duty belt. When removing article of kit from your closet, do not leave the empty hangers
between pieces of clothing, remove the hanger(s). If you have multiple left over hangers, you may store them in the coat room
where your extra hangers shall be placed neatly at one end.
8. Uniform articles are to be positioned in your closet in the order shown in the diagram. Do not deviate from the diagram. Ensure
that you are completely familiar with the clothing layout as described by numbers in your handout. Pit partners will position
articles in a mirror image fashion with each other in their ceremonial drawer and closet. Each ceremonial drawer will conform to
the ceremonial drawer diagram.
9. Ensure that any and all items of clothing (uniform and civilian) hanging in your closet and/or folded in drawers are displayed
properly; in the right order and as you would wear them: Buttons and zippers done up, etc. For neatness, towels and sheets in
drawers shall be log rolled and other articles folded neatly or rolled in a uniform size.
10. Civilian shirts will appear directly opposite your judo gi separated by four (4) hangers as outlined above. Place your civilian slacks
behind shirts, then suits/dresses and finally your jackets or coats. Two- (2) or three- (3) piece suits may be hung on a single
hanger; however, sport shirts and slacks are to be hung separately. Uniform is to be hung separately.
11. All clothing, civilian and uniform, will be clean and pressed when hung in the closet. No plastic bag or covers allowed. Remove
ALL dry cleaners tags or slips as well as threads from sewn on paper labels. Ensure all hangers face into the back of the closet.
12. You are allowed two (2) pairs of civilian shoes, two (2) pairs of running shoes only in addition to your issue uniform footwear.
“Extra” pairs of shoes, boots, etc., will be put in the storage room and not left in the closet. All uniform and civilian footwear is to
be clean, laced and face outwards away from the wall. Laces are to be tied and tucked inside the footwear. Shoes are not to be
placed backwards, sideways or stacked on top of each other.
13. Shaving gear, polishing equipment and miscellaneous articles will be in the baskets provided on shelves and in the correct
sequence. Baskets are not to be left empty. No items of issued kit are to be in the baskets.
14. In order to get a good night’s rest, cadets will break their sheets and sleep in their assigned bed every night. Sheets,
pillow cases and blankets are to be clean and wrinkle free at all times. Ironing sheets and pillow cases is acceptable after the bed
has been properly made. Do not iron the blankets. Only issue bedding is to be displayed during the day. No personal
items are allowed.

15. Hats are to be clean and free of dirt and dust and displayed as shown. The forage cap rain cover is to be stored in the outside
pocket of the patrol jacket. Stetson will be displayed in the press with the buckle facing out. Fur hat will face out and the top tied
with the bow tucked in.
16. Your laundry bag is to be kept tied tightly at all times and containing a minimal amount of dirty clothing. Do your laundry
regularly. Laundry bag must be of mesh or cotton material. Garbage bags are not acceptable.
17. Desks are to be kept neat and tidy at all times. Avoid collecting loose paper, etc., and if necessary discard anything that is of no
value.
18. Clothes drawers are to contain items of clothing only. Do not hang civilian belts and ties on hangers or place in miscellaneous
baskets. The same applies to uniform belts and ties. The ceremonial set up on top of the drawers is to be a mirror image of your
pit partner’s with clothing towels, etc., This will contain issue kit only.
19. On your desk you may have a radio or clock. Electric cord must be coiled and tied. One (1) framed picture per cadet is also
acceptable. The top corner of your desk closest to the bed may be used to display items of religious significance only.

20. Your lockable drawer is to be locked at all times and will contain all your valuables, i.e., money, jewellery, cameras cellphones,
laptops and important documents. Do not leave any valuables insecure anywhere. Your firearm storage box will be used to
lock up both your real and red pistol, handcuffs, inert spray and ASP Baton at all times.
21. It will be the individual cadet’s responsibility to ensure that the entire pit area is kept clean and free of dirt and dust daily. This
includes the interior of closets, desks and chiffonnier tops, blinds, window ledges and all floor surfaces.
Personal Garbage cans will
be emptied each and every morning so there is no garbage in the can during a daily or formal inspection. The troop is also
responsible to maintain empty pits in their dorm. Bulk items such as juice, pop, protein powder etc. may be stored in empty pits,
but must be stored in a neat and tidy fashion.
22. Sam Browne equipment is to be properly laid out on the bed as shown in the photo. Additional forage cap should be placed in the
centre of the pillow daily.

23. The troop will be responsible for the cleanliness of both doors leading into the dormitory; ensuring they are free of scuff marks
and dirt.

24. The troop will be responsible for the cleanliness of the washroom sinks, chrome, mirrors and bathtubs. You are not to leave any
personal items in the showers or bathroom stalls.
The janitorial staff will care for the rest of the washroom.
25. The troop will be responsible for the cleanliness of the storage room and the laundry room.[/b]
26. Irons are to be kept in the ironing room along with ironing boards and they will be neatly put away when not in use.
27. PT/PDT bags are to be placed under the foot of your bed. They are to be empty. It is, however, acceptable to prepare your PT/PDT
kit for a class beforehand but it is to be emptied immediately afterwards. It is also acceptable to keep one (1) “extra” pair of
runners in your PT/PDT bag providing they are clean. Wet and dirty laundry will not be tolerated inside your bag.
28. Two trunks are provided for your pit. Only personal items will be kept in trunks. No food items, articles of issue kit or dirty laundry
will be kept inside. Trunks will not be locked.
29. Soft body armour and ball cap are to be stored on top of your closet. No food or drink items are to be stored in the trunks or
anywhere else in your pit. All food brought into the pits are to be consumed immediately. Food is to be stored in proper containers
in designated areas.
30. Any appliance producing heat, fumes or vapours will be used in designated area only. This includes heat guns as they can activate
the fire alarm if used in the dorm.
31. Do not run the showers for extended periods of time. Steam vapours may activate the fire alarms.
a. Should a fire alarm sound, all cadets under the direction of the marker or designate will evacuate the building,
form up outside in troop formation and immediately take roll call.

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