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12 pk Energizer Ultimate Lithium $12.99 (for Nest Protect)

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  • Jul 28th, 2021 9:25 am
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Apr 17, 2005
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[Real Canadian Superstore] 12 pk Energizer Ultimate Lithium $12.99 (for Nest Protect)

I know these Are expensive but Been looking for these batteries as they're specifically spec'd for my nest protect I got free a couple years ago.

Alkalines drain too fast on the nest protect
These batteries have 20 year shelf lives apparently

$12.99 for a 12 Pack ($5 off right now)

Cheaper than Walmart /Amazon /Lowes and Home Depot

I guess you could cash beat at home depot if you like / have a RCSS nearby.
35 replies
Sr. Member
Sep 25, 2015
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Toronto, ON
The nest protect batteries should last the entire lifetime of the product.
Jr. Member
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Jan 5, 2008
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Halifax
If you have the battery version, they do not. I had to get new ones for my parents... Not sure how long my wired ones will last, presumably until the unit is replaced.
The battery-powered model comes with six AA batteries that Nest says will last five years, while the wired version comes with three AA batteries that are meant to serve as a backup if your electricity goes out. Nest doesn't say how long these batteries will last, but since they'll only be used as a backup they should be good for years to come.
The Protect requires lithium batteries. If alkaline are used, it will seem okay for a few hours and then report that the batteries are low again, as the lithium batteries put out a higher voltage. This can be quite annoying if you are not prepared with replacements and live in a rural area where they are not obtainable.
[OP]
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Apr 17, 2005
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Donovan wrote: If you have the battery version, they do not. I had to get new ones for my parents... Not sure how long my wired ones will last, presumably until the unit is replaced.



The Protect requires lithium batteries. If alkaline are used, it will seem okay for a few hours and then report that the batteries are low again, as the lithium batteries put out a higher voltage. This can be quite annoying if you are not prepared with replacements and live in a rural area where they are not obtainable.
Exactly that is what happened to me. I didn't realize and put Alkalines and it showed disconnected after a day.

Plus the sticker shock of $17.99 for 12, so I was happy to find these on sale while buying groceries
Deal Guru
Sep 2, 2008
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Wizard1 wrote: I know these Are expensive but Been looking for these batteries as they're specifically spec'd for my nest protect I got free a couple years ago.

Alkalines drain too fast on the nest protect
These batteries have 20 year shelf lives apparently

$12.99 for a 12 Pack ($5 off right now)

Cheaper than Walmart /Amazon /Lowes and Home Depot

I guess you could cash beat at home depot if you like / have a RCSS nearby.
Thanks. I've been waiting for a sale on these for my battery nest protects. Is there a link anywhere so I can PM home depot? Or possibly a pic of the receipt?
Member
Dec 25, 2018
454 posts
827 upvotes
This is a good price for lithium. You don’t need to say nest protect lots of other things use lithium. I have motorized blinds that require lithium batteries. Anyway good price got mine all for $17.98 so this is way better!
Jr. Member
Jul 1, 2007
184 posts
78 upvotes
Lithium AA/AAA batteries have more than 1.8v output when new, which my certain battery powered small devices don't work. Also these batteries lasted shorter than normal alkaline batteries in my some devices accept, which means they may have less MAH than alkalines.

IMO, this is just another gimic.
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Mar 6, 2003
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malletking wrote: Lithium AA/AAA batteries have more than 1.8v output when new, which my certain battery powered small devices don't work. Also these batteries lasted shorter than normal alkaline batteries in my some devices accept, which means they may have less MAH than alkalines.

IMO, this is just another gimic.
They have 3000mAH and they definitely last longer than any Alkalines I've used. Which alkalines do you have?

Just because you don't understand their advantages or why they are better doesn't make them a gimmick

Here's a link to some actual facts: http://lygte-info.dk/info/ComparisonOfA ... %20UK.html
(there's only one time you might choose an alkaline, see the graphs)
Last edited by warpdrive on Jul 24th, 2021 8:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Aug 18, 2005
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Good price. It is normally $18.99 for 12 batteries at CT.
Costco used to have these $19.99 for 20, which was practically the lowest price around.
We had a bonanza when No Frills had a 4-pack for $2.88, and I still have a bunch of those on the shelf.
- casual gastronomist -
Jr. Member
Jul 1, 2007
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warpdrive wrote: They have 3000mAH and they definitely last longer than any Alkalines I've used. Which alkalines do you have?

Just because you don't understand their advantages or why they are better doesn't make them a gimmick

Here's a link to some actual facts: http://lygte-info.dk/info/ComparisonOfA ... %20UK.html
(there's only one time you might choose an alkaline, see the graphs)
The most important thing, when and where you'll use one-time use batteries. Would you use them in high current devices continually, let's say more than 0.1A? That means you have to replace batteries every day/2-days/etc. depending on how many cells are engaged.

In my cases, I only use them in very low current devices, such as remote controller, weather sensor, signal receiver, etc. In my experience, a pair of duracells lasted double time than lithium ones.

You can find there is no comparison for low current in that article involving lithium batteries. I'd like to wonder why. There is no reason it could not be measured. So there must be a reason.
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malletking wrote: You can find there is no comparison for low current in that article involving lithium batteries. I'd like to wonder why. There is no reason it could not be measured. So there must be a reason.
I guess you didn't bother to read the linked article at all :rolleyes: It shows a measurement for 0.01A...which is the only use case where you might want an alkaline over the other chemistries.

Again, there are many use cases where these Lithium batteries are highly desirable. I bought a pile of these Ultimates because for those use cases (almost all other use cases besides low current devices), they blow the alkaline out of the water. Not to mention alkalines have destroyed a few of my devices due to their propensity to leak.
Member
Oct 14, 2007
416 posts
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Thedford
These are great performing batteries; they have many benefits over alkaline, especially their resistance to leaking.

They are a good value anytime you can buy these for around a dollar a cell.
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darcyh wrote: These are great performing batteries; they have many benefits over alkaline, especially their resistance to leaking.

They are a good value anytime you can buy these for around a dollar a cell.
yup. thanks to their long shelf life, it doesn't hurt to stock up on a few of these.

Nobody said that you should ONLY buy these Lithiums. They are disposable and unless you need their capacity, low weight, low temperature performance, higher current/voltage, shelf life, one should look at using NiMH batteries whenever possible (high drain or regular)

I have basically reduced my usage of alkalines to near zero. I've stocked up on Ikea Laddas and Ultimates (Costco). I still have the occasional Alkaline because they tend to come in the box with the product, but I haven't bought alkalines in years.
Jr. Member
Jul 1, 2007
184 posts
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warpdrive wrote: I guess you didn't bother to read the linked article at all :rolleyes: It shows a measurement for 0.01A...which is the only use case where you might want an alkaline over the other chemistries.

Again, there are many use cases where these Lithium batteries are highly desirable. I bought a pile of these Ultimates because for those use cases (almost all other use cases besides low current devices), they blow the alkaline out of the water. Not to mention alkalines have destroyed a few of my devices due to their propensity to leak.
Please read my post again, especially this sentence, "You can find there is no comparison for low current in that article involving lithium batteries", even you quoted. Specifically, 0.01a chart. Though I had second paragraph all about low current use cases. I'm not sure if you are just objecting for objecting.

The only advantage I can see so far, is it may not leak. But it hasn't been in market long enough.
Sr. Member
Dec 22, 2001
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I have multiple nest protects. They definitely don’t last the life of the product
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malletking wrote: Please read my post again, especially this sentence, "You can find there is no comparison for low current in that article involving lithium batteries", even you quoted. Specifically, 0.01a chart. Though I had second paragraph all about low current use cases. I'm not sure if you are just objecting for objecting.

The only advantage I can see so far, is it may not leak. But it hasn't been in market long enough.
All I'm objecting to is a misinformed statement that these are a gimmick. The measurements show these are higher performing batteries and in some use cases, they far exceed what alkaline chemistry can do. In the very low current case, alkalines do come close in capacity (say 2900mAH) and that's a use case where it may not make sense to use these. Under increasing load/current draw, the disparity will widen as alkaline cell's capacity will droop as the current draw increases. With temperature goes below zero, the Lithium will widen their performance advantage. The facts are there. There is no conspiracy going on.

They use a different chemistry and they aren't prone to leak because of the chemistry. Why alkalines leak so easily is well known and it's just the nature of their chemistry. I've used dozens of these Lithium over the last 10 years (they are not new inventions) and some are still in service and storage and I haven't come across a leak. I would trust these in any of my irreplaceable or expensive devices.

If you look at the facts and decide there is no advantage for your use cases, that's fine by me. I trust others will decide for themselves (after looking the facts) to see if there is an advantage for their uses. I have these in service for a few devices, NiMH almost everywhere else. I have almost no alkalines in service because I prefer not to buy low grade disposables like alkalines.
This is RedFlagDeals, not RedFlagCheapskates. Rich or poor, we all want our deals so we can buy even more stuff we may or may not need.
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Oct 14, 2007
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Thedford
In my opinion just about the worst place to use alkaline batteries is in remote controls.

You just bough a new gizmo. Maybe a new TV or home theater receiver. Often the remote gets alkaline batteries. The remote control works, the device works and everything is good. And you forget about it (at least I would). A few years pass and remote stops working and you open up battery cover to discover the batteries have leaked and damaged or destroyed the electrical battery contacts. This would not have occurred if lithium or good quality rechargeable batteries had been installed. In most cases the lithium batteries will exceed the life of the device.

Darcyh's rule for remotes: lithium batteries go in then I forget about it. At $1 a cell (my benchmark price) for lithium batteries, the two bucks is a good investment. Of course YMMV.
Jr. Member
Jul 1, 2007
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darcyh wrote: In my opinion just about the worst place to use alkaline batteries is in remote controls.

You just bough a new gizmo. Maybe a new TV or home theater receiver. Often the remote gets alkaline batteries. The remote control works, the device works and everything is good. And you forget about it (at least I would). A few years pass and remote stops working and you open up battery cover to discover the batteries have leaked and damaged or destroyed the electrical battery contacts. This would not have occurred if lithium or good quality rechargeable batteries had been installed. In most cases the lithium batteries will exceed the life of the device.

Darcyh's rule for remotes: lithium batteries go in then I forget about it. At $1 a cell (my benchmark price) for lithium batteries, the two bucks is a good investment. Of course YMMV.
I had the same expectations as yours and did, then found out lithium battery just ran out with very light and occasional usage.

But I do agree so far there is no leak from them for me yet. I haven't open lithium batteries yet, not sure if there is any liquid inside.

Anyway, if they are really suppressing alkalines from every aspect, then al should've disappeared for quite a while. I'm wondering why it hasn't happened yet. They are in similar price range now, for good brands. That means, these good brands have no need to produce al any more, in theory.

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