Shopping Discussion

Received Canada Post notice of "Amount Due" - Now what?

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  • Mar 25th, 2011 5:52 pm
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Deal Addict
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Jan 21, 2006
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Downtown Canada
Depends what specifically this "fee" is for. If it's brokerage fees, I know places like UPS consider it a separate billable service rendered, and will likely go after the sender if the package is refused. Not sure if Canada Post will absorb brokerage.

It would be interesting to see a scan of the invoice after you pick it up.
:cool:
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Jan 30, 2007
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jeedee wrote: Thanks for all the replys.

After posting this on eBay aswell, and receiving tons of bitching from eBay sellers, I guess I'll just pay the fee. I have bought/ordered many things from US sellers in the past and not once have I ever paid a penny for a fee...
Other than a $5 Canada Post charge for processing the customs form, it's not a fee. It's tax and/or duties, something you are fully obliged to pay if importing anything into this country (i.e. having something sent to you from somewhere else on the planet). If you don't want to pay taxes and/or duties on international purchases, then don't buy from other countries. It's that simple.

As for never having to pay those charges on previous purchases, you were either lucky, bought items below the threshold or didn't buy anything that was noticed by Canada Customs. If you want, you could always complain to Canada Customs that you've never paid taxes and/or duties on previous purchases and you don't think you should this time. I'm sure they'd love to make the situation right for you.

Oh...one more thing: It's not "replys", it's "replies". At least you didn't use an apostrophe too. :-)
Deal Fanatic
Mar 21, 2002
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If an item is refused and sent back all taxes and duties that had been assessed against it are canceled. Canada Post cancels their $5 clearance/collection fee as well since there was nothing to collect.

Keep in mind that your refusing a delivery is not going to put the seller in a good mood. He's certainly not going to refund shipping charges and he could even hit you with restocking charges. That being said why were you stupid enough in the first place to order something you didn't want? And if you want to bring up the issue that you weren't aware of the import charges then I'm sorry because that's no excuse. It is solely your responsibility to find out about these charges before you order.
Deal Expert
Jan 7, 2002
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Waterloo, ON
jeedee wrote: I have bought/ordered many things from US sellers in the past and not once have I ever paid a penny for a fee...
General principle for purchasing stuff from outside Canada is that you're responsible for all taxes, duties, brokerage fees, etc. when you import your purchase. The seller is never responsible for this, in part because they can't be expected to know customs regulations of foreign (to them) countries.

There's one exception to this. Some vendors like TigerDirect or LL Bean do so much business with Canadians that they've got an arrangement with their shipper (usually UPS), approved by Canada Customs, whereby they pre-clear Canada-bound items before they're shipped. In this case they'll include taxes, duties, brokerage fees, etc. either in the "Canadian price" or add it during the checkout process so that you pay them for it and they forward it Canada Customs. In that situation you won't be liable for further charges when the package arrives at your door.
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Mar 14, 2005
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Hey, I had to pay $5 processing fee + taxes on a mere $35 item! If you don't want to pay these fees, order from a seller in Canada!
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[OP]
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Mar 20, 2010
32 posts
burnaby
woof wrote: That being said why were you stupid enough in the first place to order something you didn't want? And if you want to bring up the issue that you weren't aware of the import charges then I'm sorry because that's no excuse. It is solely your responsibility to find out about these charges before you order.

Did I say I didn't want the item? I simply stated "right now I just want a refund".

Why do you think I bought [buy it now] and paid for the item with my own money? Cause I wanted the item

I also never said "I wasn't aware of import charges". I know how and where they come from, it just surprised me that I got it, as I have never had pay anything before.
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Jan 30, 2007
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jeedee wrote: I know how and where they come from, it just surprised me that I got it, as I have never had pay anything before.
If you know how and where they came from, why were you surprised? Did you forget you were buying from another country? Did you not now know that imported items from other countries were subject to duties and/or taxes>
Deal Fanatic
Oct 26, 2008
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BC
jeedee wrote: Thanks for all the replys.

After posting this on eBay aswell, and receiving tons of bitching from eBay sellers, I guess I'll just pay the fee. I have bought/ordered many things from US sellers in the past and not once have I ever paid a penny for a fee...

Good! Then let's just move on.

Now that you have paid your taxes and C.P.'s modest fee for handling that side of things for you.

Enjoy your purchase.

You not only avoid cutting off your nose to spite your face, but you do us all a favour too.

A lot of U.S. eBay sellers do get annoyed by buyers from other countries creating an issue like this - and subsequently make their auctions U.S. only. I hate that.
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Nov 10, 2005
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Farm
jeedee wrote: Thanks for all the replys.

After posting this on eBay aswell, and receiving tons of bitching from eBay sellers, I guess I'll just pay the fee. I have bought/ordered many things from US sellers in the past and not once have I ever paid a penny for a fee...

you never paid a fee... well that's probably because the item was marked low and it wasn't even worth the hassle for them to charge taxes on it.

i guess your luck has run out.
Member
Oct 2, 2010
430 posts
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What is the nature of the item? Electronics? Computer? Have you ever purchased anything that expensive from USA? I know many small purchases I've made from the USA (under $100) I never got charged taxes on. When I purchased a computer on eBay for ~$300 I had to pay HST. Sounds like seller even marked it under value and you're saving on taxes. Not a good idea for the seller, but obviously the item has made it safely so they got away with it.
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Sep 24, 2006
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samkat wrote: Pretty sure Canada Post has a huge warehouse depot of stuff like. Parcels that were refused and sent to die there. Unless, they have auctions.

Would be interested to hear from some CP workers about this.

LOL, No totally false. The stuff does not belong to Canada Post. It gets sent back to the original owner.


If it's an item without a return to sender address, it goes to a certain area in the Plant who opens the packages up & tries to find some kind of address information on the inside. if there is nothing that shows who sent it, the item is then destroyed. But never would they auction off or sell items that are not theirs.
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Jan 7, 2002
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Kris81 wrote: But never would they auction off or sell items that are not theirs.
Are you sure? What if the item is really valuable?

Dead letter mail: "Countries must also set up regulations for the disposal of dead letters, particularly when they contain items of value. Some very valuable items have turned up in undeliverable mail, including a stolen painting by Marc Chagall which turned up in a United States Postal Service sorting center in Topeka, Kansas."

Dead letter office: In the US at least, "Items of value that cannot be returned are sold at auction, except for pornography and firearms." Why would Canada be any different?
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Sep 30, 2001
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jeedee wrote: I also never said "I wasn't aware of import charges". I know how and where they come from, it just surprised me that I got it, as I have never had pay anything before.

lol wut? How can you be aware of taxes but then feign surprise when you get assessed?

In my opinion it's guys like you which force US sellers in saying "no" to Canadian buyers. Why should they bother with the hassles in dealing with customers like yourself?
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Sep 24, 2006
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bylo wrote: Are you sure? What if the item is really valuable?

Dead letter mail: "Countries must also set up regulations for the disposal of dead letters, particularly when they contain items of value. Some very valuable items have turned up in undeliverable mail, including a stolen painting by Marc Chagall which turned up in a United States Postal Service sorting center in Topeka, Kansas."

Dead letter office: In the US at least, "Items of value that cannot be returned are sold at auction, except for pornography and firearms." Why would Canada be any different?

Why don't you just google it?
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Jan 7, 2002
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Kris81 wrote: if there is nothing that shows who sent it, the item is then destroyed. But never would they auction off or sell items that are not theirs.
Moi wrote:Are you sure? What if the item is really valuable?
Kris81 wrote: Why don't you just google it?
OK.

What Happens to Undeliverable Mail?
Each item will be opened and if it is determined that the item:
• has no obvious value, it will be destroyed
• contains merchandise with value and a forwarding address can be found, the item will be priced as required and forwarded to either the sender or addressee. If an address cannot be found, the item will be sold (or otherwise disposed of) by Canada Post and the proceeds deposited to the credit of Canada Post
• contains cash, the money will be deposited to the credit of Canada Post. If a forwarding address can be found, the cash will be converted to a postal Money Order, the item will be priced as required and forwarded to either the sender or addressee
• has contents that are prohibited by law, the item will be disposed of or turned over to the appropriate policing agency.

Undeliverable items that originate in the United States or other countries will be returned to the Undeliverable Mail Office of the country of origin.
Looks like there's need for some remedial training at Canada Post ;)
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