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Recommendation for a grub killer

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  • Aug 20th, 2021 1:20 pm
[OP]
Jr. Member
Aug 24, 2010
144 posts
136 upvotes

Recommendation for a grub killer

We just resodded our front yard last year and now there’s yellow patches all over the grass. I lifted the grass and it’s coming out with no roots… which means the bloody grubs have striken again.
What are you guys using for grubs? We put in the nematodes this spring looks like nothing happened with that. Please help!
C5DE7E54-125E-458F-B8BE-6E71CAACA832.jpeg
22 replies
Deal Fanatic
Feb 4, 2010
6574 posts
6048 upvotes
To me that doesn't look like grub damage - it just look like it's going dormant given the heat and lack of rain - completely normal. It will be green again in the fall when it rains. If not, just needs to be dethatched.
Sr. Member
Jul 20, 2012
744 posts
311 upvotes
Guelph
If it was grubs you would have snout holes from skunks or raccoons looking for and finding them. That's been my experience. I had them earlier this year. I used Grub-B-Gone, it seems to work
Deal Addict
Mar 22, 2017
2419 posts
3183 upvotes
West GTA
hierophant wrote: To me that doesn't look like grub damage - it just look like it's going dormant given the heat and lack of rain - completely normal. It will be green again in the fall when it rains. If not, just needs to be dethatched.
If the patches are coming out with no roots, it's likely grub damage. Dormant grass stays anchored to the soil

OP, you have a few options:

1. Nematodes. This kind of works, but is not completely effective and is hard to apply. To apply properly, you have to apply when there is NO UV. The UV will kill the worms. That means applying in the rain or in the early morning or late evening. You also have to apply it onto a wet lawn and then water it in thoroughly, which also lends itself to applying in the rain. You also need fresh nematodes - they should be shipped to you direct and cool.
2. BtK granules. Similar effectiveness to nematodes, have to water in, somewhat less sensitive to freshness and you can use a spreader. Not a miracle.
3. Milky Spore. Doesn't work that well here as the winters can be hard on it, though may be fine in the warmer parts of the country (Southern Ontario, coastal BC). Not emergency curative - preventative, used when the damage is light. Works well, long lasting. Wait for a low UV environment (dawn, dusk), apply in small piles in a grid, water in thoroughly.
4. Imported chemistry from the US. This works, it kills everything fast, it's also difficult to source and legality is questionable.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 21, 2013
8038 posts
9011 upvotes
Montréal
Ho!

And how do you train birds to dig the soil and find out the grubs????? Grubs are UNDER the grass, and they eat roots... animals who eats grubs are skunks, who digs to find them. And make a mess of holes everywhere

Helpless...
Delilah14 wrote: We just resodded our front yard last year and now there’s yellow patches all over the grass. I lifted the grass and it’s coming out with no roots… which means the bloody grubs have striken again.
What are you guys using for grubs? We put in the nematodes this spring looks like nothing happened with that. Please help! C5DE7E54-125E-458F-B8BE-6E71CAACA832.jpeg
First, curious that you do not have holes, digged by skunks trying to find and eat grubs, does not look like grubs damages, although you lifted patch of grass

Grub-B-Gone have not been that much effective here, and nematodes neither. The only way I found is to mow the lawn at the highest wheel level, keeping the grass thick and long. I also leave the grass clippings there, and it makes some natural fertilizer... When there is patches of dead grass I try to take care of it by re-seeding, and it is a continuous work of maintenance. Since most chemicals are banned, there is not much to do. Nematodes are supposed to be uber effective, but is kind of sketchy to apply, maybe we both have done something wrong...


Grub B Gone have not been that effective here...
Sr. Member
Aug 29, 2019
995 posts
453 upvotes
DoorCrasher wrote: Ho!

And how do you train birds to dig the soil and find out the grubs????? Grubs are UNDER the grass, and they eat roots... animals who eats grubs are skunks, who digs to find them. And make a mess of holes everywhere

Helpless...



Image

"Omnivorous. Feeds on insects, including beetle grubs, grasshoppers, caterpillars, many others; also spiders, millipedes, earthworms..."

Grackles live in colonies, you can have anywhere from 20 upwards of 100+ of them on your lawn looking for grubs. Whenever you see a flock of blackbirds on the lawn, that is what they are doing. Don't disturb them. They will take care of your grubs.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 21, 2013
8038 posts
9011 upvotes
Montréal
Katedontbreak wrote: Image

"Omnivorous. Feeds on insects, including beetle grubs, grasshoppers, caterpillars, many others; also spiders, millipedes, earthworms..."

Grackles live in colonies, you can have anywhere from 20 upwards of 100+ of them on your lawn looking for grubs. Whenever you see a flock of blackbirds on the lawn, that is what they are doing. Don't disturb them. They will take care of your grubs.
I don't think that birds dig deep enough to cet you rid of WHITE grubs
Sr. Member
Aug 29, 2019
995 posts
453 upvotes
DoorCrasher wrote: I don't think that birds dig deep enough to cet you rid of WHITE grubs
Look at how long and knife like the beak is on that bird. The grackle and the starling eat grubs and lots of them. They are 2 common blackbirds of Ontario and actually most people hate them because they travel in large flocks and are bossy and sometimes aggressive to smaller, less numerous birds at the birdfeeder but what some people don't realize is how good they are at keeping your lawn grub free.

Unlike other birds, these birds search for food in large flocks, even during the breeding season. You may wonder how 1 bird can help your grub problem? Well that's the thing, these birds don't travel singularly, even small groups will number around 20 birds and if they're searching for food for their young, just 1 grackle or starling can take 300 grubs a day, while not injuring your new sod like an animal would. Not all birds can search for grubs but our common black birds can and are very good at it, they are equally good at hunting the adult beetles.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 21, 2013
8038 posts
9011 upvotes
Montréal
Katedontbreak wrote: Look at how long and knife like the beak is on that bird. The grackle and the starling eat grubs and lots of them. They are 2 common blackbirds of Ontario and actually most people hate them because they travel in large flocks and are bossy and sometimes aggressive to smaller, less numerous birds at the birdfeeder but what some people don't realize is how good they are at keeping your lawn grub free.

Unlike other birds, these birds search for food in large flocks, even during the breeding season. You may wonder how 1 bird can help your grub problem? Well that's the thing, these birds don't travel singularly, even small groups will number around 20 birds and if they're searching for food for their young, just 1 grackle or starling can take 300 grubs a day, while not injuring your new sod like an animal would. Not all birds can search for grubs but our common black birds can and are very good at it, they are equally good at hunting the adult beetles.
and... OP is asking for a solution to get rid of white grubs... what, he should buy or train those birds? again, your answer is useless.

Have a nice day.
Member
May 1, 2007
400 posts
189 upvotes
Toronto
When I worked at The Weed Man we used Diazinon 5G.
Member
May 1, 2007
400 posts
189 upvotes
Toronto
hierophant wrote: To me that doesn't look like grub damage - it just look like it's going dormant given the heat and lack of rain - completely normal. It will be green again in the fall when it rains. If not, just needs to be dethatched.
After looking at the pictures I have to agree.

If there were grubs the raccoons would be pulling up the sod in sheets. Also - grubs aren't that common in the dead of summer - more spring/fall.

Look to see if you have chinch bugs. This is more a mid-season insect issue.
Deal Fanatic
Feb 4, 2010
6574 posts
6048 upvotes
rjp123 wrote: After looking at the pictures I have to agree.

If there were grubs the raccoons would be pulling up the sod in sheets. Also - grubs aren't that common in the dead of summer - more spring/fall.

Look to see if you have chinch bugs. This is more a mid-season insect issue.
I honestly see nothing wrong with OP's lawn - mine looks worse and it only started getting like that at the beginning of August since the lack of rainfall. Before that it was nice and green - we've had a pretty rainy Jun and Jul.

I did have cinch bugs a couple of years back - dethatching and overseeding will fix it. If that truly is the case, OP you'll know by the fall if it's not green again.

Many people don't understand that grass is meant to go dormant in the summer and winter - it's is not environmentally sustainable to have green lawns in the thick of summer. This is why I have huge issues with lawns - people think having a weed free, green lawn is natural and normal when it's not.

Best thing to do for lawn maintenance is overseed in the spring or fall using something kike this https://www.homedepot.ca/product/sun-jo ... 1001035942 and spend a couple of hours every other week in the spring and summer to hand dig weeds - it's best not to think of it was a chore but rather outdoor exercise. No need to water your lawn or use chemicals and you have a a nice weed free lawn without a big environmental impact.
Sr. Member
Aug 29, 2019
995 posts
453 upvotes
DoorCrasher wrote: and... OP is asking for a solution to get rid of white grubs... what, he should buy or train those birds? again, your answer is useless.

Have a nice day.
A bird feeder.Slightly Smiling Face
Member
Nov 10, 2005
421 posts
313 upvotes
hierophant wrote: I honestly see nothing wrong with OP's lawn - mine looks worse and it only started getting like that at the beginning of August since the lack of rainfall. Before that it was nice and green - we've had a pretty rainy Jun and Jul.
His lawn is starting to be detached from its roots. His grass is essentially being turned into carpet that's laying on top of dirt.
It's not a matter of how it looks, it's a matter of not having a lawn anymore if this isn't taken care of.
Deal Addict
Sep 7, 2018
1658 posts
2001 upvotes
rilles wrote: I used this spring and fall for 2 years, I now appear to be grub free.
When should I apply? August or Sept?
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User avatar
Aug 29, 2001
5865 posts
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rural ontario
superscoots wrote:
When should I apply? August or Sept?
Late August.
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