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Recommendation and things to know before installing pot lights

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  • Feb 25th, 2020 1:05 am
[OP]
Member
Apr 5, 2017
237 posts
37 upvotes

Recommendation and things to know before installing pot lights

Recommendation and things to know before installing pot lights. Recommendation for any good electricians in Durham region, ON.
Which is the best place to buy pot lights ? What kinds of pot lights are best for indoor and outdoor use ? Is it better to install new switches or can we use the switch for the power outlet for pot lights ? For living and family room , is it better to install only pot lights or its better to put a centre chandelier and pot lights around ? Average pot light installation cost per light ?
Kindly advice....
52 replies
Newbie
Dec 17, 2019
29 posts
21 upvotes
Almost all of those questions can be answered once you hire the electrician for an estimate. The key is to get the right guy for the job, and someone who can get you the Pot light permit afterwards.
[OP]
Member
Apr 5, 2017
237 posts
37 upvotes
Number1boss wrote: Almost all of those questions can be answered once you hire the electrician for an estimate. The key is to get the right guy for the job, and someone who can get you the Pot light permit afterwards.
Thanks but why we need pot light permit ?
Deal Addict
Jan 15, 2017
2911 posts
2270 upvotes
My only one suggestion regarding pot lights is not to install too many. Some people tend to go over board with pot lights installing too many in a small room. In a family room, for instance, pot lights will work in combination with your lamps. Most dining rooms have a chandelier over their table that provides more than enough lighting for the room. I would suggest that you only install pot lights in rooms where there is a noticeable lack of lighting. In rooms with more than one pot, make sure that they are dimmable and on a dimmer switch.
Sr. Member
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Nov 23, 2011
508 posts
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West GTA
I bought mine from Amazon and have been really happy (OOOled brand). As mentioned above, a dimmer is a must with pot lights.
Deal Fanatic
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Oct 19, 2008
6378 posts
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GTA
skeet50 wrote: My only one suggestion regarding pot lights is not to install too many. Some people tend to go over board with pot lights installing too many in a small room.
Its often at recomendation of the installer/designer who gets paid by the pot light. Certainly not saying every installer does this but its common enough. Also Its easier to install recessed lights the closer they are to each other, drill bit goes into holes made for each light to drill joists/pull wires.....so more lights makes holes closer together which is an easier install.
Brings up a good thing to ask pot light installers, if any additional holes are made who deals with that.
Deal Guru
Aug 26, 2002
12920 posts
4594 upvotes
Toronto, ON
Just be aware of the difference in light beam/pattern between LED panel pot lights and the more traditional recessed bulb pot lights. The newer LED panels are easier to install and placed because they are low profile so they can potentially go at or very close to where a joist is located, but they spread light wider than the recessed bulb pot lights so you don't get the cone of light beam effect. This gives a different feel for say a living room where you want only certain areas to be well lit (task desk, sofa, paintings on a wall). Hard to do task-specific lighting with LED panel pot lights.

As for permits, I think you need to have the work inspected and certified by ESA. A good electrician can coordinate that for you for a fee.

And yes, you definitely need a dimmer with LED pot lights because they are bright at maximum.
Sr. Member
Mar 22, 2017
790 posts
702 upvotes
Tips:

1. Make sure that the pot lights to be installed are air sealed when put in. Otherwise you have a pile of cracks that are going into your attic (assuming lights are installed into non-insulated space).
2. Don't get 5000k pot lights. Those are only appropriate for brightly lit work spaces. Get 3000k, which are still crisp but not operating room like.
3. Get them with a dimmer, always. When enough pot lights are put into a room to fill it without 'light pools', they are often pretty bright on max brightness.
4. Make sure the lights are good quality and the dimmer is as well. Otherwise you can get uneven lighting, flickering, etc.
5. Make sure the dimmer is rated for low-wattage pot lights (assuming you're going LED).
6. If you're setting a slimline LED potlight style where it's all integrated (get IC rated lights), pick up a couple of spares so if you ever get one fail you can replace it without hunting down the correct light.
7. Get them with a permit - a lot of electricians competing on price will want to splice the lights into an existing circuit, which given their very low draw isn't particularly dangerous, but it's sometimes against code. Not getting a permit is definitely a no-no. It'll cost a lot more than something done the 'easy way', but then you have it done right.
Deal Addict
Jan 15, 2017
2911 posts
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Zamboni wrote: Its often at recomendation of the installer/designer who gets paid by the pot light. Certainly not saying every installer does this but its common enough. Also Its easier to install recessed lights the closer they are to each other, drill bit goes into holes made for each light to drill joists/pull wires.....so more lights makes holes closer together which is an easier install.
Brings up a good thing to ask pot light installers, if any additional holes are made who deals with that.
Good to know. More lights in a room is not though necessarily a good thing for the home owner if they are constantly have to dim them because they produce too much light.
Deal Addict
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Jun 21, 2003
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Stoney Creek, ON
rvs007 wrote: As for permits, I think you need to have the work inspected and certified by ESA. A good electrician can coordinate that for you for a fee.
The electrician you hire MUST coordinate the ESA permit. The home owner can not pull the permit for a contractor. The home owner can only legally pull the permit if they are personally doing the work.

OP, Do not hire an electrician that tries to do the job without pulling an ESA permit for this. That is against the law.

You have also asked a ton of questions in your post. Personally the electrician you hire is the one to answer those questions for you. Someone experienced can come in and give you the best layout for your home. Don't worry about buying the lights yourself. The electrician gets better products for lower prices at the distributor so let them worry about that.
[OP]
Member
Apr 5, 2017
237 posts
37 upvotes
Hi Folks,
An electrician had installed few pot lights in my place last time for cash and he never bothered to pull any permits. Will I be in trouble in future when I try to sell my place ?
Thanks.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Nov 23, 2011
508 posts
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West GTA
MK1986 wrote: Hi Folks,
An electrician had installed few pot lights in my place last time for cash and he never bothered to pull any permits. Will I be in trouble in future when I try to sell my place ?
Thanks.
Nope
Sr. Member
User avatar
Nov 23, 2011
508 posts
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West GTA
Jerico wrote: Contractors literally do jail time for installing pot lights without an electrical permit. Home owners can be put on the hook too.
Seems a little extreme, I've never seen or heard of this happening, in Ontario anyways.

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