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Removing Artex ceiling finish -did anybody try this?

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[OP]
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Jun 27, 2015
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Removing Artex ceiling finish -did anybody try this?

Here is what I am talking about:

Image

How do I get rid of it ?
14 replies
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Oct 19, 2008
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Careful, older artex finishes often had asbestos so don't even sand the high spots without testing. If you google on the net you'll see method of applying a bonding coat and then 1-2 skim coats of drywall compound.
Temp. Banned
Dec 18, 2009
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Just drywall over it for the least headaches.
[OP]
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I expect to be difficult to drywall over it since you need to get to the joists to firmly attach the new layer of drywall + you will have a challenge to install it in a horizontal position due to the offset already introduced by the existing dryawall + artex

Another option would be to remove the drywall and do catherdral ceiling with this ocassion :-)
The new ceilling will be at the collar ties level shown in the picture

Image
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Oct 22, 2007
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As Zamboni has stated, I would first ensure that there is no asbestos.

If the ceiling has not be primed and painted, it's fairly easy to remove with either a plastic or metal putty knife, trowel ect. If it has been painted, then the surface will be much harder to remove. Drywalling over it is labour intensive, drywall ceilings are generally 5/8" so I would remove existing, repair, prime and paint.

As for raising the ceiling, although the look will be improved, only you will know if the cost can be justified as that option is by far the most labour intensive, therefore much more expensive.
[OP]
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Zamboni wrote: Careful, older artex finishes often had asbestos so don't even sand the high spots without testing. If you google on the net you'll see method of applying a bonding coat and then 1-2 skim coats of drywall compound.
Yeah . I guess this is the way to go
PS: Ignore the soundtrack
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Maymybonneliveforever wrote: As Zamboni has stated, I would first ensure that there is no asbestos.

If the ceiling has not be primed and painted, it's fairly easy to remove with either a plastic or metal putty knife, trowel ect. If it has been painted, then the surface will be much harder to remove.
Methods used to remove a popcorn ceiling don't work on a real artex ceiling, looks like OP has a troweled on actual artex type finish, that's why I mentioned checking for asbestos before disturbing it.

About 10 years ago a buddy put 1/4 drywall over a similar ceiling in Hogs Hollow that contained asbestos. I helped a day to remove crown molding, tricky to do without damaging while trying not to crumble up too much of the asbestos plastered ceiling. Then he built up where the crown molding was, laid 1/4 drywall across ceiling with long enough screws to catch the joists. Told me it took time to mud joints flat and skim coat out a depression....he wished he had used a bonding filler coat instead of drywall
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Oct 22, 2007
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Zamboni

Thanks for the information Zamboni, I learned something new today.

My wife's uncle has this applied to a 30 year old home, (30 years ago) and couple years ago he removed it himself over a weekend and repaired the ceiling himself. He's very handy. He told me he did it the same way as a stucco ceiling as that's he same material that was used to apply it. Maybe it was different in his home. I guess op's material is different.
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Jul 3, 2007
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If it was me, I would consider doing a coffered ceiling on top of it. Some installation methods use 1/4 inch mdf panels, which in this case would hide the original ceiling texture.
[OP]
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@Zamboni
What does this mean exactly""troweled on actual artex type finish"
What other types of Artex finish are there?
By the look of it does it seem to be the type that would contain asbestos?
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CuriousC wrote: @Zamboni
What does this mean exactly""troweled on actual artex type finish"
What other types of Artex finish are there?
Drywall mud with texture...that comes off like popcorn ceiling, both are easy if they haven't been painted. How old is the ceiling?....have you tried wetting it down and scraping.
I have no idea if that artex contains asbestos just from looking at it. Don't start scraping if there's any chance.
[OP]
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Zamboni wrote: Drywall mud with texture...that comes off like popcorn ceiling, both are easy if they haven't been painted. How old is the ceiling?....have you tried wetting it down and scraping.
I have no idea if that artex contains asbestos just from looking at it. Don't start scraping if there's any chance.
I have not tried anything yet.
I have no idea how old is the finish.
I came across of some pictures showing a guy who was using a steamer to wet it and scrapp it
I am afraid that any form of scrapping might end up damaging the thin paper that covers the drywall.
Not sure if after that I could pain over it without that paper

If I wet it is it OK to scrap it?
[OP]
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How about this, have you guys tried this ?
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CuriousC

Based on what I've learned from Zamboni, there are maybe 2 basic materials that were used to apply this finish, based on a photo, nobody can tell when material you have. The type of material used will determine how difficult it will be removed and whether it has asbestos in it. To me the possibility of having asbestos would be my main concern as it's dangerous to your health if disturbed which is the case if you want to remove it. That would also be the most expensive aspect as a pro would need to remove it safetly.

I would set aside a larger budget and have it tested and if it's not asbestos, then attempt to remove it youself, worst case scenario, is you hire someone to finish it if you feel the quality of your work is not up to par. As mentioned set aside a budget of say $1000.00 and if it's not asbestos than your laughing.
[OP]
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Jun 27, 2015
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East York, ON
Maymybonneliveforever wrote: CuriousC

Based on what I've learned from Zamboni, there are maybe 2 basic materials that were used to apply this finish, based on a photo, nobody can tell when material you have. The type of material used will determine how difficult it will be removed and whether it has asbestos in it. To me the possibility of having asbestos would be my main concern as it's dangerous to your health if disturbed which is the case if you want to remove it. That would also be the most expensive aspect as a pro would need to remove it safetly.

I would set aside a larger budget and have it tested and if it's not asbestos, then attempt to remove it youself, worst case scenario, is you hire someone to finish it if you feel the quality of your work is not up to par. As mentioned set aside a budget of say $1000.00 and if it's not asbestos than your laughing.
how much is the testing ?
When you say 1000 is that for doing it myself or for paying someone else?
Whey you say 1000 is with asbestos present or not?

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