Hot Deals

Renogy

Renogy PHOENIX 1000Wh Portable Power Station 953.99$ [all-in, No Tax]

  • Last Updated:
  • Feb 5th, 2023 1:08 am
[OP]
Deal Addict
May 14, 2009
1417 posts
16746 upvotes
Sherbrooke
Quentin5 wrote: Most cigarette lighter 12V output in cars have a 10A fuse so i am not surprised thats the ceiling of what you can from 12V.
Exactly, my only way around this is using a stepup 12v to 24v to pump in over 200w from a standalone battery. This is just a little experiment to see if I could extend the runtime on the Renogy device without having to charge via AC.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Feb 13, 2021
550 posts
550 upvotes
willyfonsworth wrote:
...A way to turn off my generators at night and have my fridge and freezer going for most of the night and then start up the generator in the morning....
A freezer kept closed can stay un-powered for several days, and a fridge should be okay overnight, for 5-8 hours with no power, again, not opened.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Feb 8, 2014
26984 posts
11429 upvotes
Socially Distanced
willyfonsworth wrote: Exactly, my only way around this is using a stepup 12v to 24v to pump in over 200w from a standalone battery. This is just a little experiment to see if I could extend the runtime on the Renogy device without having to charge via AC.
Interesting, simulate a higher voltage solar panel.
And for your fridge/freezer mention, in Florida those who had rooftop solar with 120V plugs and lost power post hurricane found their fridge/freezer could save their food overnight even with no battery backup. Surely not ideal but works.
In fact in Rand McNally they wear hats on their feet and hamburgers eat people
Deal Addict
May 24, 2017
1558 posts
1215 upvotes
QuinteWest
My intention for use:(if my thinking is correct)

Plug this into wall, the run extension cord to sump pump, plug in sump pump. This means sump pump will always be on battery back up whether im out of the house for few hours or even a couple days. Nothing to worry about if power goes out.

Run second extension cord to EZ Generator switch for furnace. Will only plug it in if i am going to be away for a day or two and flip the toggle to Generator.

Worst case scenario if unit needs charging i can start up generator (or neighbour can if im away).

Other outlets to power modem/router for internet and WiFi. Maybe some kitchen appliances as needed (microwave, toaster oven, electric griddle).

For cooking i would fire up natural gas bbq.

Is my logic good ? I really like the pure sine wave outlets for electronics. I will likely buy this tomorrow.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Feb 8, 2014
26984 posts
11429 upvotes
Socially Distanced
Paulie1RFD wrote: My intention for use:(if my thinking is correct)

Plug this into wall, the run extension cord to sump pump, plug in sump pump. This means sump pump will always be on battery back up whether im out of the house for few hours or even a couple days. Nothing to worry about if power goes out.

Run second extension cord to EZ Generator switch for furnace. Will only plug it in if i am going to be away for a day or two and flip the toggle to Generator.

Worst case scenario if unit needs charging i can start up generator (or neighbour can if im away).

Other outlets to power modem/router for internet and WiFi. Maybe some kitchen appliances as needed (microwave, toaster oven, electric griddle).

For cooking i would fire up natural gas bbq.

Is my logic good ? I really like the pure sine wave outlets for electronics. I will likely buy this tomorrow.
Lithium batteries live longest if stored at 40-80% charge, 100% storage in perpetuity will cause much quicker capacity loss.
I wish power station companies would add a 80% charge storage feature.
In fact in Rand McNally they wear hats on their feet and hamburgers eat people
Deal Addict
May 24, 2017
1558 posts
1215 upvotes
QuinteWest
Quentin5 wrote: Lithium batteries live longest if stored at 40-80% charge, 100% storage in perpetuity will cause much quicker capacity loss.
I wish power station companies would add a 80% charge storage feature.
Oh... Good to know!
Deal Addict
Jan 1, 2004
1573 posts
105 upvotes
Looking at similar usage but was hoping to have a larger capacity pack and power a few more devices, e.g., both furnace and fridge as minimum. I like the price and weight of this battery but 1kwh won't last a day I suppose. Ecoflow delta pro should be sufficient but expensive and pretty heavy to move.
Paulie1RFD wrote: My intention for use:(if my thinking is correct)

Plug this into wall, the run extension cord to sump pump, plug in sump pump. This means sump pump will always be on battery back up whether im out of the house for few hours or even a couple days. Nothing to worry about if power goes out.

Run second extension cord to EZ Generator switch for furnace. Will only plug it in if i am going to be away for a day or two and flip the toggle to Generator.

Worst case scenario if unit needs charging i can start up generator (or neighbour can if im away).

Other outlets to power modem/router for internet and WiFi. Maybe some kitchen appliances as needed (microwave, toaster oven, electric griddle).

For cooking i would fire up natural gas bbq.

Is my logic good ? I really like the pure sine wave outlets for electronics. I will likely buy this tomorrow.
Deal Expert
Mar 25, 2005
22393 posts
3273 upvotes
Quentin5 wrote: Lithium batteries live longest if stored at 40-80% charge, 100% storage in perpetuity will cause much quicker capacity loss.
I wish power station companies would add a 80% charge storage feature.
It's LiFePO4 so 100% should be fine
Member
User avatar
Jan 13, 2009
412 posts
314 upvotes
Add up what those devices you want to plug in required. If you want higher capacity I would recommend 1500wh. Obviously don't plug everything in at the same time.
sfrancis wrote: Looking at similar usage but was hoping to have a larger capacity pack and power a few more devices, e.g., both furnace and fridge as minimum. I like the price and weight of this battery but 1kwh won't last a day I suppose. Ecoflow delta pro should be sufficient but expensive and pretty heavy to move.
Sr. Member
Jan 20, 2013
544 posts
123 upvotes
Woodbridge
If someone is interested.
There is no perfect/universal solution for anyone.
IMO, this unit is great, except for cost. It is quite expensive unless you utilize all/most of the features. If you need a unit for mobile use, probably it is a great unit and you have to pay for it. If mobility is not your case, like for me, I am using APC UPS with "some" modifications. The main problem with APC was low capacity. Depending on the load, the capacity is barely enough to shut down equipment. Instead of existing (and dead) 2x9AH batteries I got two 12V car batteries and used 12 AWG (enough) wires to connect to UPS. In this configuration, I got over 1.5KWA capacity. My minimal load (server, nas, modem, router) is less than 500W. Tested discharge with small 650W heater, got it running for slightly longer than 2 hours. Later I found that the standby voltage on the batteries was slightly different, and added a small balancer. Voltage becomes perfectly equal.
The added cost was under $200 (2 batteries from Costco plus balancer - around $20).
Again, not a universal solution, but for that cost, it meets my expectations. If the power outage is longer, recently I got a 1600/2000 W inverter/generator and I would have enough time to connect it if I am around.
Member
Dec 27, 2011
204 posts
281 upvotes
Sherwood Park
Kasakato wrote: It's LiFePO4 so 100% should be fine
LiFePO4 still suffers from that issue. Stored at %100 will shorten the lifespan.
Deal Guru
Oct 7, 2010
13492 posts
4374 upvotes
vnkvnk wrote: If someone is interested.
There is no perfect/universal solution for anyone.
IMO, this unit is great, except for cost. It is quite expensive unless you utilize all/most of the features. If you need a unit for mobile use, probably it is a great unit and you have to pay for it. If mobility is not your case, like for me, I am using APC UPS with "some" modifications. The main problem with APC was low capacity. Depending on the load, the capacity is barely enough to shut down equipment. Instead of existing (and dead) 2x9AH batteries I got two 12V car batteries and used 12 AWG (enough) wires to connect to UPS. In this configuration, I got over 1.5KWA capacity. My minimal load (server, nas, modem, router) is less than 500W. Tested discharge with small 650W heater, got it running for slightly longer than 2 hours. Later I found that the standby voltage on the batteries was slightly different, and added a small balancer. Voltage becomes perfectly equal.
The added cost was under $200 (2 batteries from Costco plus balancer - around $20).
Again, not a universal solution, but for that cost, it meets my expectations. If the power outage is longer, recently I got a 1600/2000 W inverter/generator and I would have enough time to connect it if I am around.
Most people use these for appliance back up or power back up if grid goes. Computer equipment usually APC but not for other uses.

1KW doesnt sound that useful. Maybe 2 to 3 or 5 KW is better.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Feb 8, 2014
26984 posts
11429 upvotes
Socially Distanced
sfrancis wrote: Looking at similar usage but was hoping to have a larger capacity pack and power a few more devices, e.g., both furnace and fridge as minimum. I like the price and weight of this battery but 1kwh won't last a day I suppose. Ecoflow delta pro should be sufficient but expensive and pretty heavy to move.
The average Ontario home uses about 30kWh/day, so this is certainly not even close.
That said in a power outage you should nuke most of your usage.
In winter toss your refrigerated items in your car's trunk.
Furnaces very greatly on how much power they use, some use 100Wh (like mine, ECM motor, 40K dual stage), some use up to 1000Wh (so only 1 hour of backup on this thing). You can get cheap LED lanterns that would get you days on a charge, and weeks on 1kWh.
Fridges also vary on power usage, mine uses 900Wh/day so a days backup on this. Chest freezer uses 450Wh, so 2 days backup.
Also you might consider a solar panel so that you can recharge each day and if you have a few panels can use more than 1kwh/day.
Kasakato wrote: It's LiFePO4 so 100% should be fine
travellerw wrote:
LiFePO4 still suffers from that issue. Stored at %100 will shorten the lifespan.
This.
Last edited by Quentin5 on Jan 17th, 2023 12:43 am, edited 1 time in total.
In fact in Rand McNally they wear hats on their feet and hamburgers eat people
Sr. Member
Jan 20, 2013
544 posts
123 upvotes
Woodbridge
Quentin5 wrote:
Furnaces very greatly on how much power they use, some use 100Wh (like mine, ECM motor, 40K dual stage),
That does not sound right. My furnace is 100k and the blower motor takes around 700W to move air in the house. Plus inducer blower like 150W. I assume smaller furnaces would have smaller motors, but you still need a lot of power to move air in the house.
Anyway, for the price/stored energy, the value is not too good. if you are out of power for a long period of time, it is not a solution at all. The main advantage of that unit is mobility.
Stay warm, winter is around the corner :-)
Deal Expert
User avatar
Feb 8, 2014
26984 posts
11429 upvotes
Socially Distanced
vnkvnk wrote: That does not sound right. My furnace is 100k and the blower motor takes around 700W to move air in the house. Plus inducer blower like 150W. I assume smaller furnaces would have smaller motors, but you still need a lot of power to move air in the house.
I paid extra for the energy saving ECM motor, in first stage it runs at 25K and about 100W of energy. I have tested this.
40K second stage about 200W, AC full about 400W blower (plus 1.6kW compressor).
Anyway, for the price/stored energy, the value is not too good. if you are out of power for a long period of time, it is not a solution at all. The main advantage of that unit is mobility.
Stay warm, winter is around the corner :-)
Its not a bad unit and size will increase as costs come down.
Hell i look forward to 4680 powered units, each lithium ion battery cell would hold about 90w. Less for lithium phosphate.
In fact in Rand McNally they wear hats on their feet and hamburgers eat people
Deal Addict
May 24, 2017
1558 posts
1215 upvotes
QuinteWest
I have decided to hold off for now. Crossing fingers for mass production/competition/higher capacity to bring the price down ie: better unit for same price.

I definately do like the pure sine wave outlets, the switch over/pass through for power and compact size. Sump pump and furnace would be my main use in power outage. Modem/router for internet.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jun 7, 2001
7655 posts
1650 upvotes
Alberta
$1530 plus tax for a 2000W 2000Wh FFpower P2001 LFP was too good of a deal to ignore. Actual tested capacity averages about 1500Wh...a bit less for DC, a bit more for AC. CAD$1 per actual Wh is hard to beat. 1100W UPS is a bonus. A couple of reviews here:



Deal Expert
User avatar
Feb 8, 2014
26984 posts
11429 upvotes
Socially Distanced
DavidY wrote: $1530 plus tax for a 2000W 2000Wh FFpower P2001 LFP was too good of a deal to ignore. Actual tested capacity averages about 1500Wh...a bit less for DC, a bit more for AC. CAD$1 per actual Wh is hard to beat. 1100W UPS is a bonus. A couple of reviews here:



I find no name stuff can be cheap per watt but has poor QC and cheap components that don't last as long.
I recommend sticking to name brands.
In fact in Rand McNally they wear hats on their feet and hamburgers eat people
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jun 7, 2001
7655 posts
1650 upvotes
Alberta
Quentin5 wrote: I find no name stuff can be cheap per watt but has poor QC and cheap components that don't last as long.
I recommend sticking to name brands.
Already have several Bluetti and Jackery. Not that impressed with Bluetti as they dont last as long as their rated capacity. My Jackery 240 is a better performer than the Bluetti EB3A for example. I have been hearing about Bluetti's poor customer service for awhile now. No plans to buy any more Bluetti products. Jackery is stuck on lithium NMC instead LFP.

Ecoflow Delta 2 didnt quite meet my expectations. It seem to be a bit rushed product. Execution appears to be lacking. Lack of a UPS feature was a huge oversight. Overpriced by a couple hundred $ for the product. Not good value.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Feb 8, 2014
26984 posts
11429 upvotes
Socially Distanced
DavidY wrote: Already have several Bluetti and Jackery. Not that impressed with Bluetti as they dont last as long as their rated capacity. My Jackery 240 is a better performer than the Bluetti EB3A for example. I have been hearing about Bluetti's poor customer service for awhile now. No plans to buy any more Bluetti products. Jackery is stuck on lithium NMC instead LFP.

Ecoflow Delta 2 didnt quite meet my expectations. It seem to be a bit rushed product. Execution appears to be lacking. Lack of a UPS feature was a huge oversight. Overpriced by a couple hundred $ for the product. Not good value.
Unfortunately even if not perfect no name brands are not vindicated.
It does mean the entire industry has to up its game which is something i have talked about elsewhere.

That said bear in mind you don't get the faceplate watt-hours as inverters tend to be 80-90% efficient at best.
I have powerstations that run around 70% total efficiency.

UPS ability is an additional feature, not a requirement. One that i want but defending no name junk because the name brand doesn't have every feature out there is not a defence. Perfect being the enemy of good as it were.
I like the promise of LiFePO4 but i am not convinced of its longevity because they are mostly made by no name companies. I would like to see the legacy players making the cells.

And i have heard far too many reports of inverter failures, battery cells dying taking out the pack and poor QC that causes everything from electronics glitches to unreliable operation with the no name junk. If you are buying for emergency use then low quality is your enemy, not your friend.
In fact in Rand McNally they wear hats on their feet and hamburgers eat people

Top

Thread Information

There are currently 6 users viewing this thread. (5 members and 1 guest)

2wenty2wo, QuickFingers, alfalfa, DjRags604, HavokEX