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Rental property tenant complaining bath tub leaking water.

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  • Aug 20th, 2021 8:22 am
[OP]
Deal Addict
Sep 6, 2017
4485 posts
2968 upvotes

Rental property tenant complaining bath tub leaking water.

Went yesterday to see what the fuss is all about. It is an much older building with the cast iron bathtub. Removed the access panel and took some pictures which looks like the gasket or sealed are compromised. Also rust forming that should be removed and cleaned up.

Looks fairly easy DIY or should call in the plumber.
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13 replies
Deal Expert
User avatar
Jul 5, 2004
26705 posts
5825 upvotes
Only you know your skills. If it's easy for you, then fix it yourself.

If you're not sure, then I think you owe it to your tenant to call in a plumber. It's unfair to them for you to be in and out of their home numerous times because you're trying to figure it out.
Member
User avatar
Apr 14, 2009
417 posts
462 upvotes
Vaughan
cristianosham wrote: Went yesterday to see what the fuss is all about.
Water is leaking, if you were the renter, you would be complaining as well. You sound like a horrible landlord.
Sr. Member
May 29, 2012
602 posts
244 upvotes
Southern Ontario
Ya he went to see what the problem was and is now asking how to correct it.
Is that horrible?
A horrible landlord would not pick up the phone or go see what the problem is and just do nothing about it.

I dont know what is with all the landlord bashing goin on in RFD, there are good a bad people in every profession.

The guy is simply asking whether to try and fix himself or call a pro.

Now to OP's question. You could do it yourself if you feel up to it, probably cant make it any worse if you try first versus calling a plumber.
I've tried to fix a similar leak in my own home with a newish tub but was unsuccessful and had to call a pro.
He told me I needed to open up the drain in the tub, it screws together with the tub floor in between and scape/wire brush off all the old seal and any other rust. Then use a product called plumbers putty to remake the seal and then put it all back together.
It comes down to is it worth the effort, for me I want to try first, maybe learn something, it didnt work out this time but I learned from a pro afterwards and like it said you cant make it any worse really so only thing you lose is your time and some patience.
Sr. Member
Sep 15, 2017
796 posts
905 upvotes
Shaner wrote: Only you know your skills. If it's easy for you, then fix it yourself.

If you're not sure, then I think you owe it to your tenant to call in a plumber. It's unfair to them for you to be in and out of their home numerous times because you're trying to figure it out.
This x100. Call a plumber as you don't seem to have the skills or confidence.
Deal Fanatic
May 4, 2014
5162 posts
6950 upvotes
Toronto, ON
coffeeguy wrote: Water is leaking, if you were the renter, you would be complaining as well. You sound like a horrible landlord.
Renter did OP a favor here...

Depending on where it leaked, renter could have said nothing until there was significant damage - ceiling collapsed, rotting wood, mold...
Deal Fanatic
May 4, 2014
5162 posts
6950 upvotes
Toronto, ON
tony311 wrote: Ya he went to see what the problem was and is now asking how to correct it.
Is that horrible?
A horrible landlord would not pick up the phone or go see what the problem is and just do nothing about it.

I dont know what is with all the landlord bashing goin on in RFD, there are good a bad people in every profession.

The guy is simply asking whether to try and fix himself or call a pro.

Now to OP's question. You could do it yourself if you feel up to it, probably cant make it any worse if you try first versus calling a plumber.
I've tried to fix a similar leak in my own home with a newish tub but was unsuccessful and had to call a pro.
He told me I needed to open up the drain in the tub, it screws together with the tub floor in between and scape/wire brush off all the old seal and any other rust. Then use a product called plumbers putty to remake the seal and then put it all back together.
It comes down to is it worth the effort, for me I want to try first, maybe learn something, it didnt work out this time but I learned from a pro afterwards and like it said you cant make it any worse really so only thing you lose is your time and some patience.
I think it's from OP's starting post about "tenant complaining" and "what the fuss is about".

Again, I think tenant did OP a favor to let him know before it caused significant more costly damage.

And opening up the drain isn't hard, but more often than not, these things are seized or just rusted that the moment you touch it, the metals just disintegrates and you have a bigger problem. So if OP has to ask if he can do it, it's better he just call a plumber.
Member
Nov 30, 2016
314 posts
395 upvotes
Ontario
I think the problem here is how OP started the post: "Tenant complaining"

A leaking bathtub (no fault of the tenant, just age of the facility as you stated) is a legitimate issue, whether you interpret it to be a complaint or not, you should get this rectified ASAP.

I would call in a plumber and get it done properly. Whichever way you decide, good luck with the repairs.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Mar 23, 2008
13006 posts
9961 upvotes
Edmonton
cristianosham wrote: Went yesterday to see what the fuss is all about. It is an much older building with the cast iron bathtub. Removed the access panel and took some pictures which looks like the gasket or sealed are compromised. Also rust forming that should be removed and cleaned up.

Looks fairly easy DIY or should call in the plumber.
If it was my home, I’d repair it myself because I can monitor it and make sure everything is ok.

If it was my rental property, I’d hire a professional to fix it, so I could have more assurance it was done right. It’s also tax deductible, reducing the actual cost. I also wouldn’t want to depend on a tenant to monitor things, and potentially risking mold and rot issues that could be happening in enclosed areas.

C
Deal Fanatic
Jul 7, 2017
8353 posts
4064 upvotes
SW corner of the cou…
Just be aware the tub drainage (I believe it's enamel-coated stamped steel, not cast iron) surrounds may have rusted away so much it'll just break if you try to replace it. Happened to me a few years ago but it was with a sink that was much easier to replace.
I smile when I see container ships sailing past my house laden with stuff made in China
Sr. Member
Oct 22, 2016
893 posts
802 upvotes
Comox Valley
Call a plumber, I think you will thank yourself for doing that. Further in on your photo, is a block of wood that had previous water stains. Maybe see what that was about, at same time.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Dec 4, 2009
7370 posts
3083 upvotes
Your own home - do what you want.
Rental - call a plumber.
"I'm a bit upset. I've been grab by the back without any alert and lubrification"
Lucky
Deal Addict
May 23, 2006
1522 posts
552 upvotes
Vancouver
Same here. My home - i can do it with multiple round of trial and errors and see what works.

Rental property. Best to get it done quick for everyone's sake.
CNeufeld wrote: If it was my home, I’d repair it myself because I can monitor it and make sure everything is ok.

If it was my rental property, I’d hire a professional to fix it, so I could have more assurance it was done right. It’s also tax deductible, reducing the actual cost. I also wouldn’t want to depend on a tenant to monitor things, and potentially risking mold and rot issues that could be happening in enclosed areas.

C
Deal Addict
Nov 2, 2005
4834 posts
2088 upvotes
WFH
That tub is going to fail around the drain. Get the whole thing replaced before it becomes a much bigger problem.

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