Home & Garden

Replace old light fixtures using high wattage metal halide bulbs

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 17th, 2019 9:13 am
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Mar 17, 2006
6798 posts
5688 upvotes
North York

Replace old light fixtures using high wattage metal halide bulbs

Hi,

Just realized that I couldn't just replace a 175W Metal Halide bulb with a 25W LED bulb, I actually would need to buy an "adapter" of sort to bypass "something" in the current light (talked to a person at home depot), or replace the whole light fixture.
Seems to me that's it a good opportunity to just replace the light fixture all together.

I am no expert in this, but I have changed some light fixtures around the house, but never came across this high wattage Metal Halide bult before. Just wondering if anyone got experience and what I should do for this? Is just just a simple take out the current fixture and replace with a new one? Or there are more steps involved?

Thanks
4 replies
Deal Expert
User avatar
Jun 12, 2007
15426 posts
4597 upvotes
London
konsensei wrote: Hi,

Just realized that I couldn't just replace a 175W Metal Halide bulb with a 25W LED bulb, I actually would need to buy an "adapter" of sort to bypass "something" in the current light (talked to a person at home depot), or replace the whole light fixture.
Seems to me that's it a good opportunity to just replace the light fixture all together.

I am no expert in this, but I have changed some light fixtures around the house, but never came across this high wattage Metal Halide bult before. Just wondering if anyone got experience and what I should do for this? Is just just a simple take out the current fixture and replace with a new one? Or there are more steps involved?

Thanks

It similar to a fluorescent tube fixture. An initial high voltage pulse causes an arc between 2 contacts inside. After the arc ignites, the voltage drops back to normal

Replace the entire fixture
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Mar 17, 2006
6798 posts
5688 upvotes
North York
l69norm wrote: It similar to a fluorescent tube fixture. An initial high voltage pulse causes an arc between 2 contacts inside. After the arc ignites, the voltage drops back to normal

Replace the entire fixture
Thanks,
is it just a simple "take it off, and put up a new one", or there are more complicated steps before I do that?
Deal Expert
User avatar
Jun 12, 2007
15426 posts
4597 upvotes
London
konsensei wrote: Thanks,
is it just a simple "take it off, and put up a new one", or there are more complicated steps before I do that?


Technically, there’s 3 options
1) rewire the existing fixture to bypass the internal ballast - then swap out the metal halide bulbs with led replacements (bypass ballast type) - cons = lamps are no longer csa acceptable, may require an ESA electrical inspection

2) use metal halide ballast compatible led bulbs - direct fit, no rewiring required cons= ballast is still inline, using energy and still subject to failure, bulbs more expensive

3) replace old fixture with new led fixture, design and size optimized for led use, vs corn cob led swap out bulbs

Yes, replacing a fixture is exactly the same as a regular fixture however - is this a commercial/ industrial setting? Some commercial lighting is higher voltage like 347 vac (ie 600 vac 3phase). These should be left to an electrical contractor who has the right equipment and training to work with higher voltages
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Mar 17, 2006
6798 posts
5688 upvotes
North York
l69norm wrote: Technically, there’s 3 options
1) rewire the existing fixture to bypass the internal ballast - then swap out the metal halide bulbs with led replacements (bypass ballast type) - cons = lamps are no longer csa acceptable, may require an ESA electrical inspection

2) use metal halide ballast compatible led bulbs - direct fit, no rewiring required cons= ballast is still inline, using energy and still subject to failure, bulbs more expensive

3) replace old fixture with new led fixture, design and size optimized for led use, vs corn cob led swap out bulbs

Yes, replacing a fixture is exactly the same as a regular fixture however - is this a commercial/ industrial setting? Some commercial lighting is higher voltage like 347 vac (ie 600 vac 3phase). These should be left to an electrical contractor who has the right equipment and training to work with higher voltages
Thanks for the detailed answers.
I will contact some electrician for this work.

Top