Art and Photography

Replace our sony rx100 II ?

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  • Dec 4th, 2020 2:20 pm
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Deal Addict
Jul 23, 2008
1147 posts
308 upvotes
Montréal

Replace our sony rx100 II ?

Hi !
when travelling we like to go the compact road. We are taking pictures (mainly for printing in a photobook) with my Samsung s10 and our compact rx100 m2. Can we find something better that got the same size than the Rx100?

Thanks !
20 replies
Sr. Member
Feb 4, 2015
540 posts
1735 upvotes
Calgary, AB
Qwesty905 wrote: fuji x100f
He said something the same size.. Fuji is way bigger.
https://camerasize.com/compare/#467,705

The only interchangeable that's about the same size is the GM5, but even with a pancake lens it's going to be much thicker.
https://camerasize.com/compare/#467,570

I think the the only options that are truly pocketable is a newer RX100 or the Canon G5X. Which model you pick will depend on your budget. I think for casual travel photos RX100 is good enough like 90%+ of the time, I normally take my M43 or my FF setup in addition to my RX100 Mk3 when traveling, and I must admit I mainly just use the RX100. M43 if I need reach, FF if I think I will need low light, RX100 for everything else. I also print a lot of pictures in photobooks.
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May 5, 2010
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I'm with Verdic on this one.

I have a Fuji X100T and it is quite bigger than a RX100 and isn't pocketable in most pants or small jackets because of the thickness (lens doesn't retract).

If you move to RX100 mk III to V, the aperture can be set at F2.8 through out the whole range, which is much better than the F4.9. That's like 1.5 stop so your picture can be 1.5 times cleaner in low light.
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Mar 6, 2003
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yeah, the RX100 still rules in the pocketable zoom category. If you want better quality, you have to move to m43 or other APSC mirrorless, or Ricoh GRIII if you don't mind losing zoom
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Sr. Member
Oct 14, 2014
751 posts
797 upvotes
Southern Ontario
I start by wondering how much you're benefiting by the RX100ii over the Samsung S10, and would a newer phone fill the gap? A new phone is in the price ballpark of a newer RX100 and is definitely pocketable.

FYI I've had a few dedicated cameras (most recently the Sony a6000) and >95% of the time it doesn't leave the house while my phone is of course always on me. I find the current generation of phones have become good enough to replace dedicated cameras for me.
Sr. Member
Apr 3, 2010
754 posts
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Toronto
I have to agree with everyone here - the RX100 still rules. My OG RX100 stopped working and I haven't found anything to replace it except a newer RX100.
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Jun 3, 2008
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It's either the RX100, G9 X Mark II (2017), G7 X Mark III (2019) or G5 X Mark II (2019), depending on what sizing and price point you want.

I picked up the G9 X Mark I on clearance back in 2017 and still use it, I find it hard to carry a camera that isn't pocketable so I agree on that part...

A big plus for physical cameras is that you can buy casings to take the camera scuba diving, whereas I haven't seen a convincing smartphone case yet built for scuba diving.
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Jun 15, 2012
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Phones have come a long way with computational blending of several shots to make an instant balanced exposure. It's tiresome to go through a few hundred vac pics on a computer to do same.



Member
Apr 7, 2008
369 posts
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Toronto
Does anyone have the Rx100 m5 and where is the best place to get it on sale during Black Friday?
Sr. Member
Sep 28, 2008
517 posts
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My 2 cents but I'd rather just have a better phone than carrying a 1" sensor camera around.
Member
Apr 16, 2020
321 posts
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Medellin wrote: My 2 cents but I'd rather just have a better phone than carrying a 1" sensor camera around.
The two are absolutely not comparable. The best tool is the one you have at hand, but they aren't equal.
Sr. Member
Sep 28, 2008
517 posts
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Kneader wrote: The two are absolutely not comparable. The best tool is the one you have at hand, but they aren't equal.
I never said they're equal.

Between size difference and image quality, I would skip a 1" sensor and go for a micro 4/3 camera if not APSC. Otherwise I wouldn't bother and just use my phone.
Sr. Member
Mar 8, 2004
654 posts
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Kanata
Medellin wrote: I never said they're equal.

Between size difference and image quality, I would skip a 1" sensor and go for a micro 4/3 camera if not APSC. Otherwise I wouldn't bother and just use my phone.
Which phone are you using? Do phones these days have capabilities such as auto exposure bracketing? Can you shoot in priority modes or full manual? Manual focus? Set ISO? The latest Rx100 also has a wider lens and much longer on the long end. Can any phone do this these days? I have never shopped for a phone with the camera in mind so curious as to what they are capable of these days and at what cost?
Member
Apr 7, 2008
369 posts
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Toronto
Medellin wrote: I never said they're equal.

Between size difference and image quality, I would skip a 1" sensor and go for a micro 4/3 camera if not APSC. Otherwise I wouldn't bother and just use my phone.
I'm thinking of skipping the 1" sensor so which micro 4/3 or APSC camera would you get?
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Jun 15, 2012
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gumby_ng wrote: Which phone are you using? Do phones these days have capabilities such as auto exposure bracketing? Can you shoot in priority modes or full manual? Manual focus? Set ISO? The latest Rx100 also has a wider lens and much longer on the long end. Can any phone do this these days? I have never shopped for a phone with the camera in mind so curious as to what they are capable of these days and at what cost?

There’s some manual controls and you can shoot in mobile RAW. Skip it, the real time saver is INSTANT natural looking focus stacking and computational dynamic range to match what our eyes see. And that SURPASSES a single RAW file from a larger sensor in a dedicated camera that you’re going to have to work on anyway. No cameras do that level of HDR processing a flagship phone does with its powerful advanced chip inside, in increasingly challenging lighting conditions.

Save time, enjoy life unless you like sitting in front of a computer editing. And that’s hoping your judgment keeps it natural looking. Of course if you’re shooting birds, anything long range, proper astro shots, with gel’d strobes etc, you’re going to need the right tools. But you can’t beat the convenience of every day shooting with a modern smartphone.
Sr. Member
Sep 28, 2008
517 posts
366 upvotes
gyro wrote: I'm thinking of skipping the 1" sensor so which micro 4/3 or APSC camera would you get?
if you want compact

panasonic gx85/gx9 or olympus pen or any of the smaller fujis

Here's a good review of the gx9 and fuji xt30

gumby_ng wrote: Which phone are you using? Do phones these days have capabilities such as auto exposure bracketing? Can you shoot in priority modes or full manual? Manual focus? Set ISO? The latest Rx100 also has a wider lens and much longer on the long end. Can any phone do this these days? I have never shopped for a phone with the camera in mind so curious as to what they are capable of these days and at what cost?


Here's a photographer's review of the iphone 12 pro

There are camera apps that give you more control over the phone camera. I'm just forgetting it atm.
Sr. Member
Mar 8, 2004
654 posts
437 upvotes
Kanata
AncasterRFD wrote:
There’s some manual controls and you can shoot in mobile RAW. Skip it, the real time saver is INSTANT natural looking focus stacking and computational dynamic range to match what our eyes see. And that SURPASSES a single RAW file from a larger sensor in a dedicated camera that you’re going to have to work on anyway. No cameras do that level of HDR processing a flagship phone does with its powerful advanced chip inside, in increasingly challenging lighting conditions.

Save time, enjoy life unless you like sitting in front of a computer editing. And that’s hoping your judgment keeps it natural looking. Of course if you’re shooting birds, anything long range, proper astro shots, with gel’d strobes etc, you’re going to need the right tools. But you can’t beat the convenience of every day shooting with a modern smartphone.
Sounds like it depends on what you want to get out of photography. Does one want to get to the end picture as quickly and conveniently as possible or does one enjoy the "journey" to get there?

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