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Replaced chimney flue / mortar just before heavy rain. Is it going to be ok?

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  • Sep 9th, 2021 10:29 am
[OP]
Member
Mar 14, 2018
486 posts
495 upvotes

Replaced chimney flue / mortar just before heavy rain. Is it going to be ok?

I just had a masonry contractor replace my chimney flue this morning, which involved replacing the old mortar as well. My understanding is that it's actually ideal for the mortar to be moist for it to cure, but given the heavy rain right now... should I be worried?
14 replies
Newbie
Jan 2, 2014
29 posts
11 upvotes
Toronto
no as long as they used proper cement it should be fine in this weather
Deal Addict
Oct 12, 2006
1956 posts
397 upvotes
Alberta
Just had mine done too (although it's not raining).
Are you getting a new liner too?
Deal Addict
Sep 22, 2009
2847 posts
1505 upvotes
Markham
clutch31 wrote: I just had a masonry contractor replace my chimney flue this morning, which involved replacing the old mortar as well. My understanding is that it's actually ideal for the mortar to be moist for it to cure, but given the heavy rain right now... should I be worried?
No one will able to tell you. We don't know the workmanship, what was used, how it was done.
Instead of asking people on the internet, climb on the roof and inspect yourself. Or ask the contractor to come back to check because you are concern they didn't do the job at the right time.
[OP]
Member
Mar 14, 2018
486 posts
495 upvotes
BDSL wrote: No one will able to tell you. We don't know the workmanship, what was used, how it was done.
Instead of asking people on the internet, climb on the roof and inspect yourself. Or ask the contractor to come back to check because you are concern they didn't do the job at the right time.
Thanks for the pro tip! Stop wasting your time here on useless posts lol.
[OP]
Member
Mar 14, 2018
486 posts
495 upvotes
Chingyul wrote: Just had mine done too (although it's not raining).
Are you getting a new liner too?
No, we don't use the fireplace. The repair was done mainly for safety reasons and possible water leak...
Deal Addict
Nov 9, 2008
1745 posts
781 upvotes
Toronto
If it was finished yesterday, then yes that could be off concern.

We had some brickwork done a few weeks ago during the intense heat, and I misted the mortar every couple of hours during the day, for a few days, help it cure.

While it's true that keeping fresh mortar damp will help strengthen the cure, too much water will weaken the mortar and too much force (think Jet setting on your hose, or very heavy driving rain) could wash the mortar out of the joints.

I'd agree with BDL - best to inspect or ask the company/stonemason to come inspect based on the storm and take some pictures to show you.
Deal Addict
Sep 22, 2009
2847 posts
1505 upvotes
Markham
jacquesstrap wrote: I'd agree with BDL - best to inspect or ask the company/stonemason to come inspect based on the storm and take some pictures to show you.
Thank you. Seems like people are coming to internet for answers and we will mysteriously have answers without knowing all the details.
[OP]
Member
Mar 14, 2018
486 posts
495 upvotes
BDSL wrote: Thank you. Seems like people are coming to internet for answers and we will mysteriously have answers without knowing all the details.
Then don't answer.
[OP]
Member
Mar 14, 2018
486 posts
495 upvotes
jacquesstrap wrote: If it was finished yesterday, then yes that could be off concern.

We had some brickwork done a few weeks ago during the intense heat, and I misted the mortar every couple of hours during the day, for a few days, help it cure.

While it's true that keeping fresh mortar damp will help strengthen the cure, too much water will weaken the mortar and too much force (think Jet setting on your hose, or very heavy driving rain) could wash the mortar out of the joints.

I'd agree with BDL - best to inspect or ask the company/stonemason to come inspect based on the storm and take some pictures to show you.
Thanks for the information. Unfortunately, I don't have a ladder to go up to the roof. Wasn't sure if it's worth bothering contacting the company.
Deal Addict
Sep 22, 2009
2847 posts
1505 upvotes
Markham
clutch31 wrote: Thanks for the information. Unfortunately, I don't have a ladder to go up to the roof. Wasn't sure if it's worth bothering contacting the company.
So, if you can't go up yourself and you are not going to bother contacting the company, how will we going to know?
I am trying to help you. I already told you in post #4 what to do. And jacquesstrap also confirmed what to do.
[OP]
Member
Mar 14, 2018
486 posts
495 upvotes
BDSL wrote: So, if you can't go up yourself and you are not going to bother contacting the company, how will we going to know?
I am trying to help you. I already told you in post #4 what to do. And jacquesstrap also confirmed what to do.
I don't want to argue with you anymore but... people ask general questions on Internet such as how long does it take mortar to set... or how long do new seeds take to sprout.. how much mileage before winter tires wear out, etc. They want to learn general knowledge quickly if they are not familiar with it or don't have access to professionals right away. Then other people see it and might find it valuable.

Again, if you think that's a useless thing to do on Internet, don't participate... Instead of spending the majority of your time arguing with people on this forum because they don't fit your bill... It's pretty sad.
Deal Addict
Sep 22, 2009
2847 posts
1505 upvotes
Markham
21' multi-task ladder on sale at Canadian Tire starting today. I don't know how high your roof is. Good luck.
[OP]
Member
Mar 14, 2018
486 posts
495 upvotes
BDSL wrote: 21' multi-task ladder on sale at Canadian Tire starting today. I don't know how high your roof is. Good luck.
Thanks
Deal Addict
Dec 25, 2007
1196 posts
637 upvotes
GTA
Some moisture is fine, too much isn't good. How much moisture did the mortar receive?

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