Automotive

Replacement battery cost of Highlander Hybrid

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  • Dec 25th, 2020 9:43 am
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Newbie
Sep 18, 2019
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Replacement battery cost of Highlander Hybrid

What is the Replacement battery cost of Highlander Hybrid in Ontario including everything?
24 replies
Deal Expert
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Jul 30, 2007
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Toronto
toyota said their battery should be good for 8 yrs / 160,000km (prior to MY2020).
Deal Addict
Jan 8, 2009
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Ontario
Usually someone asking this question does not have to replace a battery but is worried about battery life prior to a used vehicle purchase.
Sr. Member
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Jul 26, 2008
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Montreal
GuddaKaka wrote: What is the Replacement battery cost of Highlander Hybrid in Ontario including everything?
When I was shopping for a Hybrid Highlander 2016 in Montreal, the local dealer quoted me $6500 for the battery pack. Not sure how much many hours of labor is required.

Call a local Toyota dealer with a highlander VIN and they can give you an exact quote.
Sr. Member
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Jul 26, 2008
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Montreal
Positive thinking anything is possible. But I doubt it very much unless you go for an after market or reconditioned battery pack.

Look at the cost of previous generations : https://www.greencarreports.com/news/10 ... cost-guide
The previous gens used a Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) pack

The new lithium ion battery found on the latest gen ( 2020-2021 ) might be more expensive : $10 000 USD list price
https://www.toyotapartsdeal.com/oem/toy ... 48090.html
Deal Fanatic
Aug 29, 2011
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Mississauga
One would think so if it follows the general pattern that technology costs go down as the technology matures.
Deal Fanatic
May 4, 2014
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Toronto, ON
No worries, it'll be stolen before the battery dies.
Deal Fanatic
Sep 1, 2004
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GuddaKaka wrote: And price of battery may go down too with the passage of time?
In term of inflation and what you get, sure. In term of price tag, no. I think it was like $5-$6K to replace them in 90s Prius in the 2000s as well.

Don't worry about it. You don't have to factor that cost in any more. All new cars are disposable and not meant to be kept for more than 10 years.
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Sep 9, 2012
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GuddaKaka wrote: And price of battery may go down too with the passage of time?
Well, yes and no. Cost for a brand new battery for an older vehicle likely won’t go down much. However, as recyclers start to get into the game in volume you will probably be able to get a fully reconditioned battery pack for a lot less than new in the future.

Same idea holds for the gas engine. A brand new engine won’t go down really, but you can pick up. Reconditioned one for a lot less than new. We’re just in early days yet for full scale support for reconditioned battery packs for EV/Hybrid vehicles.
Deal Addict
Jan 12, 2017
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While computers have gone down, cell phones, graphics cards, cell phone plans and many others certainly continue to set record prices each gen.

For tech like this, I would modify that to after it secures market dominance and reaches steady state. Battery tech is far from mature. If anything, it'll cost more to replace new because after 10 years, parts for your vehicle are unlikely be readily available.
mrweather wrote: One would think so if it follows the general pattern that technology costs go down as the technology matures.
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Dec 28, 2007
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naimc wrote: When I was shopping for a Hybrid Highlander 2016 in Montreal, the local dealer quoted me $6500 for the battery pack. Not sure how much many hours of labor is required.

Call a local Toyota dealer with a highlander VIN and they can give you an exact quote.
Good reason not to buy a hybrid.
Deal Fanatic
Dec 20, 2018
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jackrabbit000 wrote: Good reason not to buy a hybrid.
Why? That's pretty cheap for dealer job after 240,000km warranty on battery

People buy VW and etc and those have way higher ongoing maintenance costs yet people still buy them
Deal Addict
Jan 8, 2009
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Ontario
naimc wrote: When I was shopping for a Hybrid Highlander 2016 in Montreal, the local dealer quoted me $6500 for the battery pack. Not sure how much many hours of labor is required.

Call a local Toyota dealer with a highlander VIN and they can give you an exact quote.
Were you specifically shopping for a deal on one with a faulty traction battery? If so I am very surprised you were able to find one. My Toyota hybrid battery is fine after 15.5 years and 285k km.
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Jul 26, 2008
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Montreal
Martin (deal addict) wrote: Were you specifically shopping for a deal on one with a faulty traction battery? If so I am very surprised you were able to find one. My Toyota hybrid battery is fine after 15.5 years and 285k km.
No, we were looking at the 2014-2017 Range, We has signed contract for a 2016 hybrid with 158k km s. This issue was not the battery pack, it actual passed the DR Prius battery test, the issues were with the back idrive it had been services and the entire car had a strange vibration that not could explain. the Ford dealership that was selling it told it is was an exchange, a client traded it in for gas highlander they had as the person wanted to a higher tow capacity.
In the end we purchase a 2019 LE gas model with 44K for 33K.

When I called the local toyota dealership they told me they never had to replace a fully battery pack on a highlander.

We really wanted to Hybrid but they all the dealers we asking about $ 10 000 more than what we were willing to spend.

When we replace out second smaller car we are looking at getting a 2017+ prius prime. Looking forward to trying out that car.

I did scan my fathers in law's Lexus Hybrid a 2010 ESh , Although there was error regarding the Battery on the car, The DR prius app reported a failed battery test :

Image

here was a screen of the battery voltage while going down a hill braking when the car should have been recharging the battery :
Image

I only started using this app recently and don't know how to full interpret the data , but I think its showing the battery voltage is two high. IE the battery management software is not charging the battery because the voltage between the different blocks is out of sync ? I have noticed that the DR Prius app is buggy on iOS. I think it's better on Android.

In the case of the fathers in law car, his battery back would probable benefit from battery conditioning, but which all the battery packs are discharged and recharged a few time the bring the voltage as close as possible. This can be done by Toyoto for quite a fee or with a 3rd party Prolong system. https://hybridautomotive.com/product/pr ... y-charger/

When the battery starts to deteriorate, gas usage will go up as the car uses less and less regen braking and that's what I am trying to assess when looking at use hybrid.

Update on the DR Prius app I got in touch with the developer with my questions regarding the data I got from the Lexus ES 250H and other questions I has about the app freezing and not completing the battery test on iOS.
I was told the following
- Battery temp as reported by the apps should be above 75F for the battery tests to work, under this temp batteries will not be able to accept the full charging and could explain my failed tests.
- The Android version of the app has more features ( And I think it's less buggy )
Last edited by naimc on Dec 20th, 2020 10:04 am, edited 1 time in total.
Newbie
Jun 27, 2020
91 posts
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Kingston
Interesting information. I was looking at buying a used highlander as well (or something similar in size) and was considering the hybrid 2010-2012 to be in my price range. Hybrid would be nice, but definitely not required as not driving that much at the moment. I had a few different Toyota vehicles, and never any complaint about any of them, so would consider the highlander prior other makes.

By buying used, you don't know the status of the battery, and seeing the replacement price for the battery that would get me to shy away and still with a full gas for now. I would go the hybrid route if I could go with a new one due to the new warranty on Toyota batteries.

Now.... hypothetically, if you get a let say 2010 hybrid buy it, get it safetied and everything and then realized the battery is not great or gets bad within the first year, will the vehicle still be driveable ? or check engine codes ? less efficient than the gas version but still work ?

There's no way I could justify spending 12 or 16k for a vehicle that *might* required a hybrid battery replacement eventually. I agree they are typically long lasting, but not knowing the battery history, and knowing my typical bad luck with stuff like that, I'd rather be safe !
Deal Addict
Mar 7, 2010
2618 posts
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Mississauga
I think problem of buying a used hybrid is that , you don't know of the previous owner or owners maintain the battery well.
I heard you have to clean the battery filters so the battery won't be running too hot

I think hybrid is tricky to buy it used
Deal Expert
Mar 23, 2004
30602 posts
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GuddaKaka wrote:
And price of battery may go down too with the passage of time?
mrweather wrote: One would think so if it follows the general pattern that technology costs go down as the technology matures.
The price of the cells will probably go down, sure, but will the price of the car part of the battery pack? That's another story. Price of OEM/geniune battery pack replacement may even go up in price. Toyblowta after all is, like all other car makers, in the business of selling cars. It's not beyond these guys to price stuff like this so high that you'd rather just buy a new vehicle. This can even be said for new engines--prices there can be crazy high which is why most people looking for an entire engine would just buy a used one/one from a wrecked car. With batteries that don't work too well 'cause once they are used, they lose their life.

There could be, however, aftermarket alternatives that would be cheaper and get lower with time. But aftermarket prices are often also somewhat dependent on what the OE part sells for. If the OE were selling for $5k, then they would have to price the aftermarket lower than that; however if the original part is $10k, selling aftermarket for $7k is still fair game.

So yes further economies of scale, the price of tech going down, etc. should cause the actual raw materials cost to be lower; what it ends up selling to the end consumer for, can be a different story.

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