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Replacing grass with microclover tips?

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  • Aug 16th, 2021 7:55 am
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Feb 25, 2004
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Longueuil

Replacing grass with microclover tips?

My lawn was completely destroyed by white grubs. So my backyard lawn was full of weeds. A few months ago (probably end of May, beginning of June) I manually destroyed a large area with a garden hoe. I worked the soil as deep as 3 to 4 inches for the whole area. I waited 1 week to make sure all the weeds were dead (they were). Then the next week I seeded microclover seeds. I watered for the next few days when it was not raining.

I saw new stuff growing from seeds (no weeds coming back from roots, I think I did a great job of destroying them). Unfortunately, it seems to be around 65% crabgrass or quackgrass (not sure which one) and 35% microclover. I think it is crabgrass and from what I read, seeds can stay in the ground for years which might be the reason they grew since I was watering?

I am not sure what to do. Should I destroy everything again and seed in Fall? From what I read, I think crabgrass is annual and it will die at the end of Summer?

I also destroyed another part of the lawn about 3 weeks ago with the garden hoe (3-4 inches deep). I didn't seed or water it yet but today, it was full of crabgrass. I destroyed everything again but I am really not sure I can seed now, I think there are probably more crabgrass seeds in the soil.

The worst thing is after destroying all the weeds, there is now more crabgrass than before (the other weeds seem to be pretty much gone).

Any tips on how to grow microclover successfully? I know removing the crabgrass manually as it starts to grow it better but I cannot see the difference between microclover and crabgrass at the very beginning (and the backyard is too large to do this manually). I am trying to avoid chemicals (which would likely kill the microclover I guess).
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Feb 11, 2007
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JEDI Force wrote: My lawn was completely destroyed by white grubs. So my backyard lawn was full of weeds. A few months ago (probably end of May, beginning of June) I manually destroyed a large area with a garden hoe. I worked the soil as deep as 3 to 4 inches for the whole area. I waited 1 week to make sure all the weeds were dead (they were). Then the next week I seeded microclover seeds. I watered for the next few days when it was not raining.

I saw new stuff growing from seeds (no weeds coming back from roots, I think I did a great job of destroying them). Unfortunately, it seems to be around 65% crabgrass or quackgrass (not sure which one) and 35% microclover. I think it is crabgrass and from what I read, seeds can stay in the ground for years which might be the reason they grew since I was watering?

I am not sure what to do. Should I destroy everything again and seed in Fall? From what I read, I think crabgrass is annual and it will die at the end of Summer?

I also destroyed another part of the lawn about 3 weeks ago with the garden hoe (3-4 inches deep). I didn't seed or water it yet but today, it was full of crabgrass. I destroyed everything again but I am really not sure I can seed now, I think there are probably more crabgrass seeds in the soil.

The worst thing is after destroying all the weeds, there is now more crabgrass than before (the other weeds seem to be pretty much gone).

Any tips on how to grow microclover successfully? I know removing the crabgrass manually as it starts to grow it better but I cannot see the difference between microclover and crabgrass at the very beginning (and the backyard is too large to do this manually). I am trying to avoid chemicals (which would likely kill the microclover I guess).
Problem is you weren't actually killing everything in the ground. Not sure how to do that without chemicals.
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Mar 22, 2017
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Yep, you have a couple of issues.

First, your pseudo-tilling brought some weed seeds up. The best way to address weed seeds it to spray, till, water, spray again and then seed.

Second, you didn't kill stuff in the ground - you left viable rhizomes and roots, and quackgrass is a specialist in sprouting quickly from disturbed rhizomes. Quackgrass is particularly bad since when the rhizomes are split up it's harder to kill. It's probably the worst weed - there are also no selective solutions for northern lawns.

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