Computers & Electronics

Is this resistor blown?

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  • Jul 22nd, 2020 9:40 am
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[OP]
Deal Addict
Sep 6, 2017
4490 posts
2973 upvotes

Is this resistor blown?

I am trying to figure out why this module failed. Visually looking I see the third from the left resistor looks darken. Is it s tell tale sign its blown?
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5 replies
Deal Guru
Feb 9, 2006
12918 posts
7676 upvotes
Brampton
Could be. But only way to be 100% sure is to measure the circuit.
Deal Addict
Dec 9, 2003
4991 posts
830 upvotes
Calgary
You cant "measure the circuit" You have to cut the lead on one side of the suspect resistor ( I assume you meant 3rd from the right R8) and measure the resistance with a meter, and replace if necessary. If the resistor is good, just solder the lead together again. Resistor #2 (R37) from the right also looks a little suspect.

Read up on how to read resistor values BBROYGBVGW
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[OP]
Deal Addict
Sep 6, 2017
4490 posts
2973 upvotes
Cough wrote: You cant "measure the circuit" You have to cut the lead on one side of the suspect resistor ( I assume you meant 3rd from the right R8) and measure the resistance with a meter, and replace if necessary. If the resistor is good, just solder the lead together again. Resistor #2 (R37) from the right also looks a little suspect.

Read up on how to read resistor values BBROYGBVGW
Yes you are correct R8 is the one that has burnt marks.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 1, 2006
9075 posts
3080 upvotes
Toronto
IME, it's rare for a resistor to fail on it's own. More likely that some other component failed leading to the resistor being overloaded and subsequently failing. But, it all depends on the circuit and the application. Only you know that.
Deal Fanatic
Jan 21, 2018
7562 posts
8138 upvotes
Vancouver
Jimbobs wrote: IME, it's rare for a resistor to fail on it's own. More likely that some other component failed leading to the resistor being overloaded and subsequently failing. But, it all depends on the circuit and the application. Only you know that.
This.

Resistors are there to limit current to other components that can't handle it. If the resistor got enough current to blow it, the other components are toast.

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