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  • Jul 29th, 2020 9:33 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Feb 9, 2020
8 posts
1 upvote

resolved

resolved
Last edited by toronto87 on Jul 31st, 2020 4:49 pm, edited 3 times in total.
3 replies
Deal Addict
Jun 26, 2019
1960 posts
1695 upvotes
GTA
Sounds like you may have a case, have you thought about doing a "reno" vs a full knockdown? I know a number of homes in Toronto have gone this route to keep their house right on a property line. This said, more often than not, especially in Toronto, setups like these can result in drainage issues.

This is something you would just discuss with your Architect and let them handle it.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Mar 31, 2008
12757 posts
2845 upvotes
Toronto
I went to a contentious hearing for a property in my area (it was a mega showdown). But all other properties were just passed basically. But they do look at what is the alternative.

The only one that didn't was a guy wanted variance for a side walk up basement entrance right up to the property line instead of backyard to keep the backyard for him and family without intrusion. Since that was the conventional option first, the committee declined the side and said backyard entrance should be done. Even though he was without opposition from his neighbour. Actually neighbour gave a note saying he was fine with it.

I can't recall if drainage issues was one of the reasons, but it does seem side variance is a bit stricter. Height is easy to pass.
Deal Addict
Jun 26, 2019
1960 posts
1695 upvotes
GTA
toronto87 wrote: architect said if i keep it down to 1 or 2 variances, i have a decent shot...
Your architect should have a good idea of what has a high likelihood of success and what doesn't. AC placement has become another big spot where the city or your neighbours can really stop you from moving forward.

This said, sometimes it just luck of the draw.
at1212b wrote: I can't recall if drainage issues was one of the reasons, but it does seem side variance is a bit stricter. Height is easy to pass.
Drainage is always a huge concern, even more so in Toronto because in most areas its bad to begin with. Generally speaking you have to prove that your development will not adversely impact neighbouring lots. As houses generally get bigger when you build new ones, the main way to do this is to entirely self contain your drainage. Therefore, these lots with minimal side lot areas or zero lot setbacks require some additional planning if you're going to get them approved.

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