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Resume Wizards: I could use some help.

  • Last Updated:
  • Feb 3rd, 2018 5:41 pm
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[OP]
Newbie
Nov 19, 2017
18 posts

Resume Wizards: I could use some help.

Hello all,

I'm planning on starting my resume from scratch and I am looking for some recommended resources in doing so. After speaking with a friend who recently completed her MBA, she was explaining that her school's career services was excellent in helping her revise her resume. Unfortunately, I do not have such resources aside from whatever info I find online.

About me:
-Political science grad, 2016 (regret 1.)
-2 years Financial services
-Ideally aiming for Business Analyst work

Unfortunately my current education has drastically limited me to my current role within a larger bank. I am trying to highlight my credentials, but I feel I am often overlooked due to my education (hence the resume re-flash).

Any advice will be appreciated; I'm currently scanning through 'the vault' to help as there are consulting/analysis pieces I have seen thus far.

Cheers,
-Will
5 replies
Sr. Member
Aug 2, 2012
668 posts
245 upvotes
Are you working under 20 hours a week? If so, there are agencies funded to help with this sort of thing, free to you. If you're in Ontario, I can provide a resource to help you find a service near you. Outside Ontario, I could probably find something.

If you're not eligible for these services, then resources online are your best bet. There is some good advice out there; Monster.ca's career advice section is generally good, and here's an article that could help: https://www.monster.ca/career-advice/ar ... kes-canada

Regarding your education, are you putting it at the end of your resume? That helps to de-emphasise it, and it's where it should be anyway. But don't be embarrassed about it - own it. You have a bachelor's degree. You studied in a field that teaches you critical and analytical skills, logic and reasoning. You most likely have strong reading and interpreting skills. You're able to research, find data, evaluate it and use it in support of a specific strategic direction. You can understand different viewpoints, which should give you the ability to negotiate. You will also be used to deadlines and teamworking. Take a look here: https://navigator.wlu.ca/career/student ... cience.htm

The bottom line on your resume, though, is that you won't know how to rewrite it unless you know what sort of work you're looking for. There's no such thing, in an employer's eyes, as a generic resume. Find your career goal - better still, find a job posting you feel you're qualified for - and then work on targeting your resume to that goal. Search for resources on resume targeting, and go from there.
Zois90 wrote: Hello all,

I'm planning on starting my resume from scratch and I am looking for some recommended resources in doing so. After speaking with a friend who recently completed her MBA, she was explaining that her school's career services was excellent in helping her revise her resume. Unfortunately, I do not have such resources aside from whatever info I find online.

About me:
-Political science grad, 2016 (regret 1.)
-2 years Financial services
-Ideally aiming for Business Analyst work

Unfortunately my current education has drastically limited me to my current role within a larger bank. I am trying to highlight my credentials, but I feel I am often overlooked due to my education (hence the resume re-flash).

Any advice will be appreciated; I'm currently scanning through 'the vault' to help as there are consulting/analysis pieces I have seen thus far.

Cheers,
-Will
[OP]
Newbie
Nov 19, 2017
18 posts
EmpCouns wrote: Are you working under 20 hours a week? If so, there are agencies funded to help with this sort of thing, free to you. If you're in Ontario, I can provide a resource to help you find a service near you. Outside Ontario, I could probably find something.

If you're not eligible for these services, then resources online are your best bet. There is some good advice out there; Monster.ca's career advice section is generally good, and here's an article that could help: https://www.monster.ca/career-advice/ar ... kes-canada

Regarding your education, are you putting it at the end of your resume? That helps to de-emphasise it, and it's where it should be anyway. But don't be embarrassed about it - own it. You have a bachelor's degree. You studied in a field that teaches you critical and analytical skills, logic and reasoning. You most likely have strong reading and interpreting skills. You're able to research, find data, evaluate it and use it in support of a specific strategic direction. You can understand different viewpoints, which should give you the ability to negotiate. You will also be used to deadlines and teamworking. Take a look here: https://navigator.wlu.ca/career/student ... cience.htm

The bottom line on your resume, though, is that you won't know how to rewrite it unless you know what sort of work you're looking for. There's no such thing, in an employer's eyes, as a generic resume. Find your career goal - better still, find a job posting you feel you're qualified for - and then work on targeting your resume to that goal. Search for resources on resume targeting, and go from there.

I appreciate the well detailed message. I am currently employed full-time earning about $47k, but I'm not in my ideal environment. It's not too much the income that's bothering me, as I have only been out of school for less than two years, but just the type of work. I'm a Financial service rep, and I'm having difficulty getting feedback on my resume.

I have started implementing the "STAR" methodology (http://www.caseinterview.com/star-method) for my bullet points, but my resume seems to be lacking that 'wow' factor.

In addition to my lack of format (struggling to find something I like), I having difficulty showcasing relevant skills. In hindsight, I would have taken a Business Technology Management degree, which would have paved the way quite nicely. At this point it could very well be a lack of attained skillset for me making this career change, so I'm now trying to self-teach familiar systems that potential employers would use.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 17, 2008
1180 posts
113 upvotes
Well, simple answer would be to draw as little attention to your education as possible then.
Sr. Member
Aug 2, 2012
668 posts
245 upvotes
I rarely recommend paid resume services, because I work at an agency that provides this help for free, and I have seen individuals who paid a LOT of money and got something I really did not think much of. But you could see whether you could find a resume or job-search consultant who could give you a couple of sessions. It's not just about writing a resume for you (though there are fee-for-service consultants who will promise you the earth in terms of finding you a job and they rewrite your resume as the first step). Look for someone who focuses on resume and job-search coaching, so that you can learn the techniques and apply them yourself in the future. The problem with paying someone to write the 'perfect resume' is that it's not perfect for every job, and you need to know the skills of tailoring each time.

You're at the other end of the country from me, or I could recommend someone I know who does a good job. But practices and expectations do vary around the country, and so you're better off looking for someone local to you.

(And I re-emphasise that the best way to deal with your education is to own and be proud of the transferable skills you gained from it. But if lack of a different sort of education is holding you back, why not start taking some courses part-time? You're looking for business analyst work. So why not take courses in Lean Six Sigma? Project management might help also, but Lean/Six Sigma certifications are VERY highly rated)

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