Shopping Discussion

Retail sales rebound in Canada, recouping all of pandemic losses

  • Last Updated:
  • Jul 22nd, 2020 11:17 am
[OP]
Deal Addict
May 2, 2013
1959 posts
3969 upvotes
Bloor-Yonge

Retail sales rebound in Canada, recouping all of pandemic losses

25 replies
Deal Addict
Oct 24, 2011
1344 posts
1192 upvotes
SURREY
So the thousands of dollars people got for sitting at home were wisely spent I see. And of course this will continue even after the government stops paying people. /sarcasm

It’s going to get ugly in the next six months.
If it’s not at least 50% off is it really a deal?
Deal Guru
Dec 5, 2006
13074 posts
8319 upvotes
Markham
DjRags604 wrote: So the thousands of dollars people got for sitting at home were wisely spent I see. And of course this will continue even after the government stops paying people. /sarcasm

It’s going to get ugly in the next six months.
Depends on how wisely we continue to spend lol

But if no case surge as USA, it probably will continue to perform below pre pandemic, but not necessarily be ugly

But certainly some jobs are gone forever

The challenge for employment is people do spend, but increasingly spend online, so same sales amount with significant less employees
Deal Addict
Oct 24, 2011
1344 posts
1192 upvotes
SURREY
smartie wrote: Depends on how wisely we continue to spend lol

But if no case surge as USA, it probably will continue to perform below pre pandemic, but not necessarily be ugly

But certainly some jobs are gone forever

The challenge for employment is people do spend, but increasingly spend online, so same sales amount with significant less employees
The problem is how closely our economy is tied to America. We build cars for them, we send them fuel, we send them meat. If their economy crashes, ours won’t be that far behind. Canada made it through the 08 crash relatively unscathed but that was largely due to it not being co-morbid with a disease and a leader with a stronger sense of economics. I consider myself a fairly optimistic person, to the point of naivety sometimes, but this one has me more than a little worried.
If it’s not at least 50% off is it really a deal?
Deal Guru
Jul 19, 2012
14724 posts
4852 upvotes
Montreal
That's only because stores are using the "Pandemic Excuse" not to take opened returns, even those that are defective.

Shoot, if I had a business that expressly forbid any and all returns, I'd be rolling in money, as China produces ultra-cheap crap with absolutely zero quality control, but the trade-off is that you need to take returns on the broken, defective and DOA items that are naturally produced by this type of deeply-flawed system.

No returns = a license to print money.
My last and final digital game I purchased at PSN from those Sony Devils was on November 22, 2020 - Ban that Sorny!
Sr. Member
User avatar
Sep 16, 2015
632 posts
1288 upvotes
Calgary, AB
JackWhyte wrote: China produces ultra-cheap crap with absolutely zero quality control, but the trade-off is that you need to take returns on the broken, defective and DOA items that are naturally produced by this type of deeply-flawed system.
I'm going to call you out on this. Just because *some* companies do this does not mean it's standard practice. Our company makes consumer electronics. Final assembly is in Canada, but our circuit boards are fabbed and assembled in China. We have quality control at every step of the process - flying probe rigs to verify the unpopulated boards, microscopic and xray inspection, factory firmware test procedures and so on. Our internal DOA board rate is well under 1%.

Chinese factories are incredibly good at what they do. Like anything else, things go wrong if you severely cut corners. However, we actually save money by implementing rigorous QAQC procedures throughout the supply chain. If the factory knows the board is bad, they don't populate it. If a board fails test after assembly, they either repair or recycle it instead of shipping it to us.
Deal Guru
Dec 5, 2006
13074 posts
8319 upvotes
Markham
jaybeeg wrote: I'm going to call you out on this. Just because *some* companies do this does not mean it's standard practice. Our company makes consumer electronics. Final assembly is in Canada, but our circuit boards are fabbed and assembled in China. We have quality control at every step of the process - flying probe rigs to verify the unpopulated boards, microscopic and xray inspection, factory firmware test procedures and so on. Our internal DOA board rate is well under 1%.

Chinese factories are incredibly good at what they do. Like anything else, things go wrong if you severely cut corners. However, we actually save money by implementing rigorous QAQC procedures throughout the supply chain. If the factory knows the board is bad, they don't populate it. If a board fails test after assembly, they either repair or recycle it instead of shipping it to us.
China as a manufacturing powerhouse, they manufacture all levels of products from lowest quality (or zero quality) stuff to high end things. That's why we have dollarama , Walmart and Apple.

But on the other hand, China cannot forced Canada to buy from them, we as consumers decide. If we continue to buy "low quality " stuff, then don't blame China. If we all buy high quality stuff, then pay the price

Pick up side
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 11, 2003
3750 posts
1063 upvotes
GTA North
100 % of zero is easy. Businesses 200 - 300% just to recoup the losses they had the last few months.
.
Heatware 3-0
.
.
Homer Simpson - Marge, don't discourage the boy! Weaseling out of things is what separates us from animals - except for the weasel.
Deal Fanatic
Jan 19, 2017
7453 posts
4347 upvotes
Recouping all losses. It is hard to believe. There are still millions on CERB.
Deal Guru
Jul 19, 2012
14724 posts
4852 upvotes
Montreal
jaybeeg wrote: I'm going to call you out on this. Just because *some* companies do this does not mean it's standard practice.
Yes it is, and as I stated (and you obviously missed) I was referring to China-produced products, not Canadian-produced-using-some-China-parts products. If we took away all the retail items that contained even a small part or chemical produced in China, there would be little on the store shelves.

To be extra clear for all reading levels, I am talking about FINAL PRODUCTS produced in China, shipped for retail from China, and then after inspection and transportation, unpacked and placed on Canadian retail shelves, Clear?

I know for a fact that the majority of these have little to no true quality control, as that's not what China is good at and it wastes time that could be used to create and ship more goods to the West. They produce the goods, consumers here test the goods, and we return the defective and DOA. That's how it works in 2020 and this method creates the highest profit and produces the goods the fastest.

But the pandemic broke this chain, and without the ability to return China-crap, you're just rolling the dice and crossing your fingers that you don't get a dud.
My last and final digital game I purchased at PSN from those Sony Devils was on November 22, 2020 - Ban that Sorny!
Deal Expert
User avatar
Dec 19, 2001
31347 posts
2017 upvotes
Fernando Poo
No surprises here. That the central banks flooded the markets with free cash would push this along, though it was unnecessary and will bit us all in the ass in the end.
Welcome to the Minitrue FDs, Ficdep
Deal Guru
Dec 5, 2006
13074 posts
8319 upvotes
Markham
ml88888888 wrote: Recouping all losses. It is hard to believe. There are still millions on CERB.
Now you know where we spend cerb lol
Deal Guru
Dec 5, 2006
13074 posts
8319 upvotes
Markham
JackWhyte wrote: Yes it is, and as I stated (and you obviously missed) I was referring to China-produced products, not Canadian-produced-using-some-China-parts products. If we took away all the retail items that contained even a small part or chemical produced in China, there would be little on the store shelves.

To be extra clear for all reading levels, I am talking about FINAL PRODUCTS produced in China, shipped for retail from China, and then after inspection and transportation, unpacked and placed on Canadian retail shelves, Clear?

I know for a fact that the majority of these have little to no true quality control, as that's not what China is good at and it wastes time that could be used to create and ship more goods to the West. They produce the goods, consumers here test the goods, and we return the defective and DOA. That's how it works in 2020 and this method creates the highest profit and produces the goods the fastest.

But the pandemic broke this chain, and without the ability to return China-crap, you're just rolling the dice and crossing your fingers that you don't get a dud.
Or you mainly buy from dollarama and Walmart? So you have high chance to get low quality stuff?

Let's say if Walmart or dollarama know those low priced stuff are low quality and they don't care, as consumer, why not call out Walmart? They are responsible for the stuff in their shelf, no?
Deal Guru
Nov 15, 2008
12217 posts
7298 upvotes
I don't know how they come to say that? The only sales that are up a bit vs 2019 are food, wine, weed and Walmart, vs. e.g., entire fashion industry was down 70% vs 2019. We did worse than the US. https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/daily-q ... 2a-eng.htm

Root Stats Can data article is referencing: https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/daily-q ... 1&indgeo=0
Retail sales were up 18.7% in May to $41.8 billion. Motor vehicle and parts dealers led the growth, followed by an increase in sales in almost all other subsectors. Although sales increased in May, retail sales remain 20.0% below February levels.

In comparison, retail sales rose 19.7% in the United States in May.

Following COVID-19-related store closures in April, a number of provinces moved ahead with plans to re-open their respective economies, which impacted the retail sector in May.

Based on respondent feedback, approximately 23% of retailers were closed during May. The average length of shutdown was five business days. Despite these challenging times, many retailers reported their sales figures and Statistics Canada thanks them for their continued collaboration.

Sales were up in 10 out of 11 subsectors in May. Motor vehicle and parts dealers, general merchandise stores, as well as clothing and clothing accessories stores were the main contributors to the strength seen in May. Although most subsectors were up in May, it is important to note they have not rebounded to sales levels seen before COVID-19.

Retail sales in volume terms were up 17.8% in May, following a record decline of 24.1% in April.

Given the rapidly-evolving economic situation, Statistics Canada is providing an advance estimate of June sales. Early estimates suggest that retail sales increased by 24.5% in June. Owing to its preliminary nature, this figure should be expected to be revised.


E-commerce sales by Canadian retailers
On an unadjusted basis, retail e-commerce sales were $3.8 billion in May, accounting for 8.0% of total retail trade. On a year-over-year basis, retail e-commerce increased 112.7%, while total unadjusted retail sales fell 18.2%.

When adjusted for basic seasonal effects, retail e-commerce grew 0.7% in May.
Deal Guru
Jul 19, 2012
14724 posts
4852 upvotes
Montreal
smartie wrote: But on the other hand, China cannot forced Canada to buy from them, we as consumers decide. If we continue to buy "low quality " stuff, then don't blame China.
Why not, as China paid off the government to hide the origin of many Chinese-produced products, and instead replaced it with a "distributed by XYZ in Canada" notation, so it's virtually impossible to determine where all this junk is being produced. The hallowed "Made in Canada" food label only requires that 51% of food contents are from Canada, and there are companies out there weighing it to the gram to barely hit 51%, with the 49% being from China.

But what the hell, pandemics, disease, rampant overpopulation, climate change, resource scarcity, and continued economic imbalance between the rich & poor will make the next 10-15 years a real treat before everything totally melts down.
My last and final digital game I purchased at PSN from those Sony Devils was on November 22, 2020 - Ban that Sorny!
Deal Guru
Jul 19, 2012
14724 posts
4852 upvotes
Montreal
smartie wrote: Let's say if Walmart or dollarama know those low priced stuff are low quality and they don't care, as consumer, why not call out Walmart? They are responsible for the stuff in their shelf, no?
Apparently not, as Walmart will no longer accept any open returns, and Dollarama is a greasy 3rd-world bazaar hiding behind a "final sale" sign.
My last and final digital game I purchased at PSN from those Sony Devils was on November 22, 2020 - Ban that Sorny!
Deal Guru
Dec 5, 2006
13074 posts
8319 upvotes
Markham
JackWhyte wrote: Why not, as China paid off the government to hide the origin of many Chinese-produced products, and instead replaced it with a "distributed by XYZ in Canada" notation
Source?
Deal Guru
Dec 5, 2006
13074 posts
8319 upvotes
Markham
JackWhyte wrote: Apparently not, as Walmart will no longer accept any open returns, and Dollarama is a greasy 3rd-world bazaar hiding behind a "final sale" sign.
Then blame Walmart, call them out, go to protest
Sr. Member
User avatar
Sep 16, 2015
632 posts
1288 upvotes
Calgary, AB
JackWhyte wrote: Why not, as China paid off the government to hide the origin of many Chinese-produced products, and instead replaced it with a "distributed by XYZ in Canada" notation, so it's virtually impossible to determine where all this junk is being produced.
What's your source for the claim that China paid off the Canadian government for this labeling? I'm genuinely interested.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Nov 15, 2004
20482 posts
4243 upvotes
Toronto
I didn't lose my job and I don't know anyone on CERB, but I've stopped buying from Amazon whenever possible after Bezos went full evil during the pandemic, and I imagine a lot of other people did as well. Supporting local businesses and workers is especially important during times like this.

Top