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Which router bit to make groove in hardwood ?

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  • Jul 2nd, 2021 9:02 pm
[OP]
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Dec 6, 2008
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Acton, Ontario

Which router bit to make groove in hardwood ?

Will be doing 3/4'' hardwood flooring at home soon, and I know I will run into two spots where I will have to cut new groove in hardwood to make it fit.
But I'm a bit confused which bit will be right for the job.
Last edited by toyopl on Jun 28th, 2021 5:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.
11 replies
Sr. Member
Sep 5, 2011
997 posts
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Toronto
If you have a router table and want to cut a grove flat on the table. Use this slot cutter. They have different cutter thickness & bearing sizes to choose from.

https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop/to ... ith-shafts

If you want to cut it on its edge riding against the fence, then use a simple straight cutter bit.

https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop/to ... em=86J0204
Deal Guru
Jan 25, 2007
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Paris
Are you cutting a dado slot in the board? If so, you will want to make a few passes vs all in one go. I learned that the very very hard way about 22 years ago when making oak picture frames and almost cost me a finger.
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Jun 26, 2019
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+1 for what @PCShutters said. You could also use a table saw if you don't have a router table or jig.
toyopl wrote: Will be doing 3/4'' hardwood at home soon, and I know I will run into two spots where I will have to cut new groove in hardwood to make it fit.
But I'm a bit confused which bit will be right for the job.
I'd be interested to know what your two spots are, then we could probably better help advise. Are they boards on an angle? Are you going to have to cut a T&G?
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Nov 12, 2006
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London
toyopl wrote: Will be doing 3/4'' hardwood at home soon, and I know I will run into two spots where I will have to cut new groove in hardwood to make it fit.
But I'm a bit confused which bit will be right for the job.
I'm making an assumption here that you meant to say "Will be doing 3/4'' hardwood flooring at home soon", and not just building some random item out of hardwood.
I think most tried to read your mind, however complete answers require complete questions.
[OP]
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Dec 6, 2008
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arisk wrote: I'm making an assumption here that you meant to say "Will be doing 3/4'' hardwood flooring at home soon", and not just building some random item out of hardwood.
I think most tried to read your mind, however complete answers require complete questions.
You got it, I guess I wrote it too quick, and missed that 1 Important word :)
[OP]
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Dec 6, 2008
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SubjectivelyObjective wrote: +1 for what @PCShutters said. You could also use a table saw if you don't have a router table or jig.



I'd be interested to know what your two spots are, then we could probably better help advise. Are they boards on an angle? Are you going to have to cut a T&G?
Will be installing new stair nosing, which has grove already cut in it, then will insert spline into it so I can join it with 3/4' hardwood and keep going.
Layout to walls, won't allow me to start with full board against stair nosing,boards are 7.5'' wide, will have to rip board, which will end up missing factory groove.
Want to use router to put new groove in ripped board.

I'm a DIY, but this make the most sense in my mind :)

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Jr. Member
May 12, 2021
135 posts
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You’re looking to change the direction of the tongue and groove on hardwood flooring which is very common to do. The technique of cutting the tongue off the board and milling a groove is ok to do with the router. Get a cheapie set on Amazon.

How will you cut the tongue off? Table saw is the easiest way, you can use the table saw to cut the groove too as other members commented.

HOHXEN 2pcs/ Set Tongue Groove Router Bit Set 1/4" Teeth Width 1/2" Shank 3 Teeth T-Shape Wood Milling Cutter Flooring Wood Working Tools https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B079P6V8Y2/ref ... UTF8&psc=1
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Jun 26, 2019
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Jon Lai wrote: Not a flooring expert, but why is this required? Why not just flip the board around and use the groove side to insert into the nosing's groove?
Just based on doorways and stairs you usually can't lay the floor in such a way that everything works out nicely.

Routing a new t or g will work. This said, I will usually just use a domino or biscuit and that's really all you need at these locations because you just want to stop them from pulling apart and you usually don't nail thresholds or nosing where it's seen.
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Jun 26, 2009
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Usually from nosing you start with full width board, narrower boards at the wall/ under baseboard. Narrow board right at the nosing in high traffic area can cause squeaks later, you want to be as sound as possible. What you have now ( thin strip, uneven with nosing) looks bad, definitely diy job. It's actually a trip hazard, as nosing sticks out higher than floor, it should be level.
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Jan 2, 2012
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Way too complicated. You are installing flooring, not building a china cabinet.
It's wonderful that you want to try this out, but not necessary.
Use a forstner bit fashion a hole for a screw, and fasten the stair bullnose to the subfloor. Use plugs to finish it. Cut off the tongue from either the bullnose or flooring, and use Silkaflex on the board to adhere it to the subfloor.

Don't use PL Premium of any of the rigid when set polyurethanes.

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