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Roxul safe n sound worthwhile?

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[OP]
Deal Addict
Nov 2, 2011
2851 posts
1436 upvotes

Roxul safe n sound worthwhile?

Finishing my basement. Debating on putting sound proofing insulation in the ceiling or not. Debating if I would ever rent out the basement or not. If not, seems like it’s not worth it to do soundproofing insulation.

Wondering if anyone has installed this and if it’s worthwhile for noise reduction? I assume nothing will be 100%. Wouldn’t be cheap for my entire ceiling.
20 replies
Deal Addict
Mar 22, 2017
2234 posts
2765 upvotes
West GTA
Yes, do it now or you never will in my opinion. It also lets you use the downstairs as a media room more easily. It won't block noise that comes from the vents or travels through connected hard surfaces (like floor -> joists -> drywall). Vents are tricky as they usually require baffles in the ducts, typically forget it. For drywall, can install two thin layers with flexible channels between them and stuck with green glue (a glue that stays soft and decouples vibrations).

Last thing you want is a basement that you can hear everything in and vice versa.

That being said, it isn't my money and it's easy to note that it's a nice to have. It isn't a must have. I'd do it personally.
Deal Addict
Jul 22, 2009
1783 posts
1310 upvotes
Brampton
I did this but wouldn't do it again in my books was not worth it.
Deal Addict
Nov 24, 2015
1391 posts
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Durham Region
I did furnace room walls and I feel like it made a difference. Ceiling would be a bit harder and expensive and sound would still travel through vents.

Drywall itself is a decent sound insulator, maybe do a thicker layer
Sr. Member
Aug 31, 2012
665 posts
237 upvotes
Toronto
Yes. I used it and it made a difference. Can’t hear a thing down there.
Deal Addict
Dec 24, 2007
1973 posts
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Toronto
We did all of our basement ceiling, furnance walls, washroom laundry walls and washroom walls.

It definitely helps with the noise coming from upstairs and the basement rooms that are in use.

Cheers!
Thread started in 2016 - 1927 fully gutted and renovated 2 storey detached home in the big T.O. - small projects still in progress.

RFD priceless!
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jun 12, 2008
3206 posts
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Ancaster
Contractors will tell you that Safe N Sound is not a "sound proofing" material but more of a sound muffling material.

That green Sonopan board that you see at Home Depot is much more effective but pricier.
https://sonopan.com/

And as someone else mentioned most of the sound you hear is travelling through your ductwork.
Sr. Member
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Nov 23, 2011
716 posts
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West GTA
When I did our ensuite reno, I used safe n sound on the wall that is shared with my son's bedroom. Made a very noticeable difference and I'm glad I did it.
Deal Guru
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Mar 13, 2004
12782 posts
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Ontario
Sound proofing insulation will help block out the "highs" so people talking, vocals for music etc. It wont block the bass from music or a movie but it may help a little. Yes I would for sure install the insulation because it will help quiet things down. For best results you would want to add the sound proof insulation and also add sound proof drywall but it does get expensive.
Deal Expert
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Oct 23, 2008
15513 posts
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GTA, ON
sickcars wrote: Sound proofing insulation will help block out the "highs" so people talking, vocals for music etc. It wont block the bass from music or a movie but it may help a little. Yes I would for sure install the insulation because it will help quiet things down. For best results you would want to add the sound proof insulation and also add sound proof drywall but it does get expensive.
So best practice would be to just use it around specific rooms (i.e. media room and bedroom)? That would keep costs down.
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Deal Addict
Dec 25, 2007
1282 posts
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GTA
I used it in my computer room and there's not a lot of noise that travels outside of it but I don't know how it would compare with insulating the room with regular insulation.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Mar 13, 2004
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Ontario
True, if you a homeowner is on a tight budget then that would help, however noise can travel through another room and up so you need to be careful about that too.
chimaican wrote: So best practice would be to just use it around specific rooms (i.e. media room and bedroom)? That would keep costs down.
Member
Aug 22, 2012
299 posts
214 upvotes
Mark Town
With rampant inflation you'd better to do it now. Five years ago it was selling for $40/bag now it is over $80. It is always worth it as the price will only go up.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Nov 2, 2011
2851 posts
1436 upvotes
Thanks for the replies.

Yeah I am on the fence because of the cost and not sure how well it’s really going to work. Also considered just doing it under my bedroom and just doing it for the furnace room etc.

I’ve already spent extra money getting spray foam insulation done in the basement on all the walls and the
joists.

I’m on the fence about ever renting it out so if I don’t go that route I can’t see it being worth the cost to me.
Deal Fanatic
Feb 4, 2015
8072 posts
4216 upvotes
Canada, Eh!!
Recall reading few years ago that it's just marketing ploy from Roxul.

That regular Roxul insulation is just as effective as Roxul safe n sound. Perhaps a small difference but really there is more variables to sound proofing then the insulation so really not going to get true sound proof unless spend $$ on the other variables.

Some reading:

https://soundproofcentral.com/soundproo ... cheap-diy/

https://www.soundproofingcompany.com/so ... ndproofing

https://www.familyhandyman.com/project/ ... dproofing/
2022: BOC raised 3 times and MCAP raised its prime next day.
2017 to 2018: BOC raised rates 5 times and MCAP raised its prime next day each time.
2020: BOC dropped rates 3 times and MCAP waited to drop its prime to include all 3 drops.
Deal Guru
Jan 25, 2007
11550 posts
6716 upvotes
Paris
nielboy wrote: Contractors will tell you that Safe N Sound is not a "sound proofing" material but more of a sound muffling material.
My buddy used to be in charge of the industrial rock wool sound proofing division. It’s 200% a sound proofing material. Issue is that its a part of a larger package.
Deal Addict
Mar 22, 2017
2234 posts
2765 upvotes
West GTA
georvu wrote: Recall reading few years ago that it's just marketing ploy from Roxul.

That regular Roxul insulation is just as effective as Roxul safe n sound. Perhaps a small difference but really there is more variables to sound proofing then the insulation so really not going to get true sound proof unless spend $$ on the other variables.

Some reading:

https://soundproofcentral.com/soundproo ... cheap-diy/

https://www.soundproofingcompany.com/so ... ndproofing

https://www.familyhandyman.com/project/ ... dproofing/
It's the same material and the Comfortbatts also work, but the Safe and Sound are slightly thinner to provide an air gap in the joist and they didn't get an official R-rating so they're only officially for interior wall use.

As for soundproofing, nothing is sound proofing, it's all sound reducing. It's part of the package. Get this stuff between the joists, resilient channel off the joists, add a layer of sound absorption board, look into mass loaded vinyl, drywall with green glue, baffles in ducts, special sound deadening door with gaskets, etc. It depends on how hardcore you want to be.
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Jun 12, 2008
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Ancaster
Jerico wrote: My buddy used to be in charge of the industrial rock wool sound proofing division. It’s 200% a sound proofing material. Issue is that its a part of a larger package.
Sorry I misspoke Jerico....I meant sound dampening material. I can't find anywhere on the Roxul website where they claim that their Safe N Sound is completely soundproof...maybe I missed it.

We're doing our basement right now and all of the contractors who gave us quotes said the same thing which you just referred to about how good Safe N Sound is; but with a big caveat.

That is in a perfect world the cavities between the joists or wall studs there would be nothing impeding the Safe N Sound batts....but that's never the way it is especially in the ceiling joists with wiring, ductwork etc. With all of the misc stuff that gets in the way in the ceiling joists especially the Safe N Sound effectiveness is drastically reduced.

The best way to combat the sound is with a tiered approach, as you also mentioned, but the costs go through the roof especially in the post pandemic time.

The priciest option we got was Safe N Sound, Resilient Channel, Sonopan on ceiling and 5/8" drywall on ceiling...we decided right away not to do this approach because of cost and and reduction in ceiling height as we are also putting in a subfloor.

Lastly even with the priciest tiered approach you really have a difficult mitigating the sound travel that the ductwork creates. The sound travels exceptionally well through the ductwork....akin to the styrofoam cup and string phone trick from days gone by.
Deal Fanatic
Jun 7, 2005
9540 posts
1026 upvotes
Like others have mentioned , the sound travels through the vents no matter how good the insulation is done elsewhere.
Member
Dec 3, 2008
480 posts
91 upvotes
Hamilton
rdx wrote: Like others have mentioned , the sound travels through the vents no matter how good the insulation is done elsewhere.
still better than nothing reduces alot of foot steps talking etc.
kevv

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