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Running catv cable under the subfloor

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Running catv cable under the subfloor

I'm planning to run my CATV cable (that's connect to my modem) under the subfloor since I'm currently doing a renovation.
This is the cable that's being used at home installed by Rogers technician (18AWG cable RG6Black Question Mark Ornament):

Can I use the same CATV cable? Any idea which better quality cable to use?
TIA!

catv.jpg
imgur
Last edited by tokiwadai on Feb 7th, 2021 11:45 am, edited 3 times in total.
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It's the same. Buy on Amazon.

At the same time, it's does not hurt to run a CAT7 cable as well.

Since your are doing it ... Do it once and be done with it.
16'x11' Living Room 11' Cathedral Ceiling. Hisense 65Q8G. Denon AVR-S740H 7.2 setup. Jamo Classic 10 280W Towers - FR+FL; Polk S35 - Center; Klipsch R51M - RR+RL; Klipsch R14M - Dolby FHR+FHL; Polk HTS10 Subwoofer x2. Unlocked Android Boxes from Taiwan x2
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jdmfishingonly wrote: It's the same. Buy on Amazon.

At the same time, it's does not hurt to run a CAT7 cable as well.

Since your are doing it ... Do it once and be done with it.
Thanks for the suggestions.
Any recommendations on which quality/ type coaxial cable to use?
I read it from here. RG6 is good enough?
Wondering which type the Rogers technician is using? I just saw CATC 18AWG is written on it.

Good idea for the running the CAT7 cable as well.
Sorry for my ignorance, basically I need to run this CAT7 cable from my router (as the source) to all other points of ethernet connection?
I have 4 (Gigabit) port at the back of my modem. That means I need to run 4 ethernet cable from my modem to 4 points of ethernet connection in the house?
Or I can use one port from the modem plus an ethernet switch to branch to multiple points?

I saw this at amazon.
It seems I will need this on the wall nearby my Router (Not modem, sorry typo) and run the ethernet cable to other 4 different connection points.

Everything is wireless nowadays, wondering if cable connection is still in need, for stable connection I supposed?
Last edited by tokiwadai on Feb 7th, 2021 3:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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tokiwadai wrote: Thanks for the suggestions.
Any recommendations on which quality/ type coaxial cable to use?
I read it from here. RG6 is good enough?
Wondering which type the Rogers technician is using? I just saw CATC 18AWG is written on it.

Good idea for the running the CAT7 cable as well.
Sorry for my ignorance, basically I need to run this CAT7 cable from my router (as the source) to all other points of ethernet connection?
I have 4 (Gigabit) port at the back of my modem. That means I need to run 4 ethernet cable from my modem to 4 points of ethernet connection in the house?
Or I can use one port from the modem plus an ethernet switch to branch to multiple points?

I saw this at amazon.
It seems I will need this on the wall nearby my modem and run the ethernet cable to other 4 different connection points.

Everything is wireless nowadays, wondering if cable connection is still in need, for stable connection I supposed?

There are other grades of coax cable but RG6 is the all-purpose one that you see in most homes. It's a good idea to run RG6 cable when you're about to close up a floor, ceiling or wall.

I have CAT6 because I ran cables 11 years ago. If I was doing it today, I would probably go with CAT7 but I doubt I would notice any performance difference for years to come.

My set-up is as follows: modem to router (through wall outlets similar to the one you linked) and also to a 16 port gigabit switch. Those ports are connected (also through wall outlets) to dedicated wall outlets where there's TV, stereo, and computer workstations. I have six port gigabit switches at the TV outlets because I don't want to have to unplug cables everytime I want to go from one device to another. The modem to router allows people to connect their portable devices to the internet but they do not get to connect to the home network (which also has a dedicated network attached server with 8 TBs of storage for back-ups and media files).
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tokiwadai wrote: Thanks for the suggestions.
Any recommendations on which quality/ type coaxial cable to use?
I read it from here. RG6 is good enough?
Wondering which type the Rogers technician is using? I just saw CATC 18AWG is written on it.

Good idea for the running the CAT7 cable as well.
Sorry for my ignorance, basically I need to run this CAT7 cable from my router (as the source) to all other points of ethernet connection?
I have 4 (Gigabit) port at the back of my modem. That means I need to run 4 ethernet cable from my modem to 4 points of ethernet connection in the house?
Or I can use one port from the modem plus an ethernet switch to branch to multiple points?

I saw this at amazon.
It seems I will need this on the wall nearby my modem and run the ethernet cable to other 4 different connection points.

Everything is wireless nowadays, wondering if cable connection is still in need, for stable connection I supposed?
I don't use cable ... although it was already prewired in the house by the builder in 2006 ... with one COAX going to the living room, the master bedroom, and another bedroom.

CAT6 was pre-wired by the builder in 2006 to various rooms.

My modem is in the basement under the front foyer by the electrical panel. The modem has 4 Gigabit ports.

I ran three separate CAT7 cables in the basement through the joists to the back of the house (one went to the living room through the ceiling beside the fireplace ; two to separate areas in my "to be entertainment area/home office" in the basement)

My connections are:
Bell Home Hub 3000 Modem (4-Port): One CAT6A to 8-Port switch. One CAT7 to the living room. Two CAT6 to my current home office (one of the bedrooms).
D-Link 8-Port Switch: One CAT6A to the Rogers SHM Netgear Router in the mainfloor laundry room. Then plugged in the builder pre-wired CAT6 cables.

In the Living Room:
- CAT7 from the basement (self run) goes into the Asus 5-Port Gigabit Switch which feeds to my two unlocked Android Boxes (that is why I do not use cable TV) and to my Denon receiver.
- CAT6 prewired (that is already in wall) connects to the Huawei AX3 PRO Quad Core WiFi 6 router for wireless signal (to the back of the house)

In the bedroom (current home office):
- CAT6 prewired (that is already in wall) connects to my Desktop that I use for downloading
- A second in the same room CAT6 prewired (that is already in wall) connects to the Huawei AX3 PRO Quad Core WiFi 6 router for wireless signal (to the front of the house) and feeds a CAT7 to my work laptop

One bedroom (at the front of the house above the garage) only has a COAX but NO CAT cable outlet.
The master bedroom has a CAT6 prewired.
The master bathroom has a CAT6 prewired ... WTF?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?
The garage has a CAT6 prewired.

Since my friend would be moving in with us (they sold their place but the place they bought is closing 6 weeks later) ... I will be running another CAT7 from the dining room into the basement and to the D-Link 8-Port Gigabit Switch. She will be working from the living room.

Her husband will be working in the basement in the makeshift home office. The area already has a CAT7 connection which I will put in a D-Link 5-Port Gigabit Switch so that he can connect his work laptop and his personal laptop.
16'x11' Living Room 11' Cathedral Ceiling. Hisense 65Q8G. Denon AVR-S740H 7.2 setup. Jamo Classic 10 280W Towers - FR+FL; Polk S35 - Center; Klipsch R51M - RR+RL; Klipsch R14M - Dolby FHR+FHL; Polk HTS10 Subwoofer x2. Unlocked Android Boxes from Taiwan x2
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CaptSmethwick wrote: My set-up is as follows: modem to router (through wall outlets similar to the one you linked) and also to a 16 port gigabit switch.
Thanks for the tips.

Sorry, if I understand correctly you connection is like: CATV source --> Modem --> Router --> 16 port Gigabit switch ?
Or is it Modem --> 16 port Gigabit switch & Modem --> Router? In this case, your modem has multiple ethernet ports, one goes to the 16 port switch and the other one goes to the router.

I made a typo on my post, unfortunately my modem has only one ethernet port (Not 4) that will go to the router. My router is the one has 4 gigabit port.
CaptSmethwick wrote: Those ports are connected (also through wall outlets) to dedicated wall outlets where there's TV, stereo, and computer workstations. I have six port gigabit switches at the TV outlets because I don't want to have to unplug cables everytime I want to go from one device to another. The modem to router allows people to connect their portable devices to the internet but they do not get to connect to the home network (which also has a dedicated network attached server with 8 TBs of storage for back-ups and media files).
You have basically a 16 port gigabit switch that branch into 16 different points of connections around the house through the wall outlets?
Wow! Wondering how that wall plate with all 16 ports CAT6 looks like?
Wondering if you could share the picture if you don't mind?
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tokiwadai wrote: Thanks for the tips.

Sorry, if I understand correctly you connection is like: CATV source --> Modem --> Router --> 16 port Gigabit switch ?
Or is it Modem --> 16 port Gigabit switch & Modem --> Router? In this case, your modem has multiple ethernet ports, one goes to the 16 port switch and the other one goes to the router.

I made a typo on my post, unfortunately my modem has only one ethernet port (Not 4) that will go to the router. My router is the one has 4 gigabit port.



You have basically a 16 port gigabit switch that branch into 16 different points of connections around the house through the wall outlets?
Wow! Wondering how that wall plate with all 16 ports CAT6 looks like?
Wondering if you could share the picture if you don't mind?
My system has some parallel here because I have four ports in my modem so one port goes to a Netgear Nighthawk router and another port goes from the modem to the 16 port gigabit switch. That switch is pretty full and connects the NAS and all devices (laser printer, two PS3s, one PS4, one Nintendo Switch, three Bluray players, three tv's, etc. etc.)

Here's a picture of the "network closet" I set up when I installed this system 10 years ago:

Image
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tokiwadai wrote: You have basically a 16 port gigabit switch that branch into 16 different points of connections around the house through the wall outlets?
Wow! Wondering how that wall plate with all 16 ports CAT6 looks like?
Wondering if you could share the picture if you don't mind?
Its probably just the loose cables start near the wall where ever his network setup is. The cables are plugged into the switch, which is plugged into his router, which is plugged into his modem. I highly doubt he built a 16 port wall plate near his network setup which then need 16 separate little patch cables to be plugged into the switch. Either way works fine though.

EDIT: I had this thread loaded way earlier and didn't have the pic in the post above. Having both ends of the cabling terminated and put into a plate + ports is a cleaner look for sure.
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SizableSac wrote: Its probably just the loose cables start near the wall where ever his network setup is. The cables are plugged into the switch, which is plugged into his router, which is plugged into his modem. I highly doubt he built a 16 port wall plate near his network setup which then need 16 separate little patch cables to be plugged into the switch. Either way works fine though.

EDIT: I had this thread loaded way earlier and didn't have the pic in the post above. Having both ends of the cabling terminated and put into a plate + ports is a cleaner look for sure.
Yeah, while I did my own terminations for the long cable runs buried in the walls and ceilings, I bought patch cables (from Monoprice IIRC) in quantity and colour-coded based on purpose of the cable. I was a little OCD when I designed and installed this. It's not the prettiest set-up in the world but it's easy to troubleshoot connectivity issues (all ports throughout the house are numbered).
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Thanks guys for all the replies.
Can we use any types of CAT7 cable sold in Amazon?
Any specific spec for the one buried behind the wall or under the subfloor?

This is the list I got from searching amazon for CAT7 cable, amazon cat7
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tokiwadai wrote: Thanks guys for all the replies.
Can we use any types of CAT7 cable sold in Amazon?
Any specific spec for the one buried behind the wall or under the subfloor?

This is the list I got from searching amazon for CAT7 cable, amazon cat7
You can buy almost any CAT7 but stick with copper (I've seen all sorts out there - "solid copper" is what you want). Also, you have to use one that is rated for being inside walls, min CL2 IIRC. Don't scrimp - once the floor is closed up, this is your cable for an awfully long time.
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Run cat6 or Cat7.

My suggestion would be run plastic pvc like you use for drains and run the cable through there this way you can replace or run more cable in the future easily.
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Are there channels that the cable can run through under the subfloor? If not you'll have to make some channels I guess. You don't want your subfloor sitting on top of the cabling. It will not only damage the cable, it will make it hard to keep the subfloor flat.

Buy good quality cabling. Don’t waste your time with el cheapo no-name bargain basement cabling.

I would recommend name brand RG6 and name brand CAT6.

CAT7 is a dead standard. Furthermore, I’d recommend good quality name brand CAT6 over so-called higher rated cable that is cheap no-name brand. Also, anything above CAT6 is shielded, which is harder to deal with, and significantly more expensive (if you get good quality stuff that is).

BTW, when I renovated my basement, I installed RG6 everywhere. However, now it is almost completely useless. My Rogers "cable" TV is now all Ethernet based. Now that I've switched to Rogers Ignite IPTV, I can never switch back to legacy digital cable, since Rogers doesn't allow it unless you're an existing digital cable customer. The only use I have for it now is for the incoming cable line, to the modem. But that's in the basement in the wiring closet anyway. The Ethernet cabling I installed at the same is far more useful going forward.

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