Computers & Electronics

Running Ethernet Throughout Home

  • Last Updated:
  • Jun 2nd, 2020 3:19 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Apr 26, 2020
6 posts

Running Ethernet Throughout Home

I was wondering how much it would roughly cost me to run ethernet to an upstairs bedroom of a 2 story + finished basement 2700 sq ft house. The home is 8 years old, if that matters. I have a coaxial connection on both floors as well. Also, is this a task I could take on myself or no.
31 replies
Deal Fanatic
Aug 29, 2011
6093 posts
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Mississauga
Finished basement makes it harder but not impossible. As far as DIY it'll depend on how handy you are. I ran my own ethernet (Cat6 and keystone jacks) before finishing the basement.
Member
Aug 18, 2019
264 posts
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Or use any kind of WiFi extender with Ethernet port option. Or powerline adapter.
~ 👍teslanaire2bitcoinaireButStillCheapLurking@RFDForDeals✌️~
Deal Addict
Aug 4, 2006
3081 posts
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Toronto
Bell will give you G.Hn Coax adapters for free if you ask. Run at full gigabit for me
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Dec 24, 2006
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Barrie
I know people aren't giving you costing estimates which is what you are asking. I would guess it would cost about $1200 - $1400 to have a professional company do it.

However, you can do this yourself. Buy a box of Cat 6e shielded cable for about $200 (https://www.infinitecables.com/bulk-cab ... ulk-cable/) and then run those through your cold air returns in the house and up to the attic. Your cold airs upstairs should be near the ceiling so you take the cover off and then take sting with 8 or so large washers tied on the end and you drop it down to the ground. You just keep jiggling and shaking until you use up about 16' - 20' of the string when taught. You will know you are at the bottom then. You then go to the basement and listen for the noise when someone upstairs pulls and drops the washers on the air duct. Then you know where they are in the basement. You then go to your unfished furnished area and use a fish tool to snake into the cold air ducks and grab the string. bring it back into your unfinished area and then cut a hole in the duct and you can pull the string out. Now you have a path from the basement to the wall of the upper floor. Now you go in to attack and cut a large hole in the stud header where the cold air return is and you now have access from the basement to attic. Now attach the cat 6e and another string to the washers and start pulling up. Once you get to the cold air vent you can manually feed it through the joist header hole and into the attic. Voila, you now have it in the attic and can pull it to the room you want and then cut a hole in that rooms stud header and feed the cable down. Cut a hole in the drywall where you want it to come out and fish it through. Now you use that second string to pull the first string (one with the washers) back down to the basement and you simply repeat this for all the rooms you want to pull the cable too. Once done you add aluminum tape to the hole you make in the ductwork to come it completely and then you use silicone caulking in the stud header to seal the holes and seal the vapor barrier back down. Use boxless keystone covers and use a crimper to put the ends on the cables.

It would cost you about $300 for materials and then just your labour.
Deal Addict
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Nov 25, 2009
2592 posts
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Winnipeg
Ethernet over powerline but what's wrong with the wifi?
[OP]
Newbie
Apr 26, 2020
6 posts
RunnerForDeals wrote: I know people aren't giving you costing estimates which is what you are asking. I would guess it would cost about $1200 - $1400 to have a professional company do it.

However, you can do this yourself. Buy a box of Cat 6e shielded cable for about $200 (https://www.infinitecables.com/bulk-cab ... ulk-cable/) and then run those through your cold air returns in the house and up to the attic. Your cold airs upstairs should be near the ceiling so you take the cover off and then take sting with 8 or so large washers tied on the end and you drop it down to the ground. You just keep jiggling and shaking until you use up about 16' - 20' of the string when taught. You will know you are at the bottom then. You then go to the basement and listen for the noise when someone upstairs pulls and drops the washers on the air duct. Then you know where they are in the basement. You then go to your unfished furnished area and use a fish tool to snake into the cold air ducks and grab the string. bring it back into your unfinished area and then cut a hole in the duct and you can pull the string out. Now you have a path from the basement to the wall of the upper floor. Now you go in to attack and cut a large hole in the stud header where the cold air return is and you now have access from the basement to attic. Now attach the cat 6e and another string to the washers and start pulling up. Once you get to the cold air vent you can manually feed it through the joist header hole and into the attic. Voila, you now have it in the attic and can pull it to the room you want and then cut a hole in that rooms stud header and feed the cable down. Cut a hole in the drywall where you want it to come out and fish it through. Now you use that second string to pull the first string (one with the washers) back down to the basement and you simply repeat this for all the rooms you want to pull the cable too. Once done you add aluminum tape to the hole you make in the ductwork to come it completely and then you use silicone caulking in the stud header to seal the holes and seal the vapor barrier back down. Use boxless keystone covers and use a crimper to put the ends on the cables.

It would cost you about $300 for materials and then just your labour.
thank you for your reply! I will think on it.
[OP]
Newbie
Apr 26, 2020
6 posts
FrostyWinnipeg wrote: Ethernet over powerline but what's wrong with the wifi?
Certain rooms have weird deadspots I'm not sure why so I was planning on hooking up an AP upstairs to solve the issues.
Deal Guru
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Mar 23, 2008
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Edmonton
jamalar wrote: thank you for your reply! I will think on it.
If you do run it through your cold air ducting, use cable rated for that.

C
Deal Fanatic
Aug 29, 2011
6093 posts
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Mississauga
FrostyWinnipeg wrote: Ethernet over powerline but what's wrong with the wifi?
Ethernet will always be more stable/reliable, faster and more secure.

Nothing wrong with wifi you just need to be aware of its limitations.
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Sep 3, 2005
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In my house the installed telephone jacks are rj45. We never did get a phone service but I used one for LAN
Deal Expert
Mar 23, 2009
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Toronto
Unless you have a specific need for it, I wouldn't spend $1500 to install Ethernet everywhere. Also note that the cost of drywall repairs and painting would be on top of that, so it might end up being over $2000. As mentioned though, you could run it yourself. Although some spots can be a pain and awkward, conceptually it's actually very simple, and it doesn't require any permits.

For a lot of the rooms you could just use WiFi. I know you said you currently have dead spots, but you can use either Ethernet or Coax to act as a backbone for a couple of WiFi access points to cover the entire house. IOW, it doesn't necessarily have to be Ethernet. MoCA adapters for coax would work too. Also, check your phone lines to see if they are Ethernet or not.

Also, don't underestimate the ability of high end WiFi routers to cover the dead spots. In most 2700 square foot homes, two WiFi access points would be able to cover the entire home albeit maybe with slower speeds at some of furthest reaches of the house depending upon the layout. With three WiFi access points you could get very fast speeds everywhere in the home. I've also seen upgrades from single crappy routers to single good routers in homes that size solve the problems. Maybe the coverage isn't good to every spot in the house, but it's good enough with a single high end WiFi router to cover the needed spots in the house with good reliability and decent speeds. What router are you using now?
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Mar 26, 2011
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For the experts in here, what's the best place to buy bulk cat6 or cat6a either local pickup in GTA or delivered to GTA?
Deal Expert
Mar 23, 2009
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mobifree wrote: For the experts in here, what's the best place to buy bulk cat6 or cat6a either local pickup in GTA or delivered to GTA?
I’m no expert but... The electrical supply stores and some of the computer stores like Canada Computers carry it. Big box hardware stores also carry it.

However, if you want the top tier brands like Belden, or if you want special cable like outdoor cable, you’ll either have to find a supply store that carries it in stock or else special order.
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Mar 26, 2011
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Any particular stores you recommend for price?
I know PrimeCables, Inifitny Cables have it
I've been to Rona and HomeDepot -- they also carry it, but seems rather expensive.
Looking for something cheaper locally if possible, otherwise I"d have to order it online.
Deal Expert
Mar 23, 2009
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Toronto
mobifree wrote: Any particular stores you recommend for price?
I know PrimeCables, Inifitny Cables have it
I've been to Rona and HomeDepot -- they also carry it, but seems rather expensive.
Looking for something cheaper locally if possible, otherwise I"d have to order it online.
Just do a price comparison yourself. However, make sure you compare apples to apples, because cheap no-name cable just doesn't compare to good name brands like Belden. Higher risk of defects in cheap no-name cable, and yes, this can be important even for small DIY projects. For example, I got some uber cheap Chinese-made no-name cable and I found that every so often my installed lines just refused to work, even after re-terminating them with a new jack. This was never a problem with the Belden cable I bought, but the Belden cost literally three to four times as much. What's even worse if finding out that the cable is problematic long after the install is completed (and the drywall is up).

Put it this way: According to a couple of people I communicated with who do installs at major data centres, they always buy one of the top tier brands, because the failure rate of cheaper brands is high enough to be a significant factor. Not worth the hassle, esp. considering the high cost of labour for installers. We as DIYers probably do not need to be as strict, but it's something to consider.

BTW, I always try to install twice as many lines as I think I need.
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Aug 2, 2004
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EugW wrote: Put it this way: According to a couple of people I communicated with who do installs at major data centres, they always buy one of the top tier brands, because the failure rate of cheaper brands is high enough to be a significant factor. Not worth the hassle, esp. considering the high cost of labour for installers. We as DIYers probably do not need to be as strict, but it's something to consider.

BTW, I always try to install twice as many lines as I think I need.
I don’t cheap out on cables. When ever I wire a house, I always use high quality cable. Belden or Panduit and it usually costs 3 to 4 times as much as the cheap stiff from China.

Everyone is quoting 2000$ for the installation, I spent more than that just on my cables.

Installers are correct, the last thing you need is one bad cable behind a wall and you can’t easily replace it.

I also tend to drop more than I need. Again, it is better to have more than less, it is harder to add lines later on. In my house, each room has a minimum of 2 drops per wall and some rooms have 6 or 8 connections. I have two 48 port switches and 75% of it is occupied.

The average user doesn’t have to go crazy but this is one instance where you want to do it once and forget about it. Because the second time around will cost you more
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Mar 26, 2011
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Gee wrote: I don’t cheap out on cables. When ever I wire a house, I always use high quality cable. Belden or Panduit and it usually costs 3 to 4 times as much as the cheap stiff from China.

Everyone is quoting 2000$ for the installation, I spent more than that just on my cables.

Installers are correct, the last thing you need is one bad cable behind a wall and you can’t easily replace it.

I also tend to drop more than I need. Again, it is better to have more than less, it is harder to add lines later on. In my house, each room has a minimum of 2 drops per wall and some rooms have 6 or 8 connections. I have two 48 port switches and 75% of it is occupied.

The average user doesn’t have to go crazy but this is one instance where you want to do it once and forget about it. Because the second time around will cost you more
There's no way my wife lets me spend $2000 on the entire thing, let alone on cable.

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