Expired Hot Deals

[Samsung] UV Sanitizer with Wireless Charging - $35 ($33.25 with Perkopolis discount)

  • Last Updated:
  • Feb 25th, 2021 11:45 am
[OP]
Jr. Member
Nov 12, 2017
130 posts
218 upvotes
Vancouver

[Samsung] UV Sanitizer with Wireless Charging - $35 ($33.25 with Perkopolis discount)

This was on sale for the same price late last year. $35 without discount and $33.25 with Perkopolis discount.
25 replies
Newbie
Mar 24, 2016
65 posts
224 upvotes
Thanks to the pandemic, these UV scanners have popped up everywhere. I personally think it's total cashgrab banking on rampant paranoia because there has not been a report that says these UV gadgets filter out Covid (if at all, some UN studies found them to ineffective with Covid). They do a good job at killing germs in general though. But then, we all did just fine without curing our phones with UV gadgets.

Just saying...
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User avatar
May 24, 2003
4169 posts
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Toronto
navapeers wrote: Thanks to the pandemic, these UV scanners have popped up everywhere. I personally think it's total cashgrab banking on rampant paranoia because there has not been a report that says these UV gadgets filter out Covid (if at all, some UN studies found them to ineffective with Covid). They do a good job at killing germs in general though. But then, we all did just fine without curing our phones with UV gadgets.

Just saying...
Currently what you’re saying *might* be true for consumer models that use LED UV-C, but UV-C HAS been proven to kill Covid in at least 1 companies study. Link below is to Cleanslate UV’s study. Their units don’t use LED’s and they are made for business so they are A LOT more expensive than this Samsung unit.

https://cleanslateuv.com/post/clean-sla ... e-devices/
Newbie
Jan 4, 2015
46 posts
50 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
Got this last sell, charging speed is slow and it only handshake with some of my adopter. Not sure how strong the UV light is but works fine as a wireless charger.
Jr. Member
Jul 2, 2010
115 posts
57 upvotes
Vancouver
well....
1, slow charging
2, $35 enough for 700 pieces of single alcohol wipes for 2 years.
Newbie
Mar 27, 2020
14 posts
18 upvotes
benjaminyaong wrote: well....
1, slow charging
2, $35 enough for 700 pieces of single alcohol wipes for 2 years.
As someone who works in a hospital and used to use alcohol pads on my phone, and ID card every day after work. Wiping down is a royal pain the the ass and gets old quick. We used to have a UV sanitizer in my department and I would just throw everything in there, which was so much more convenient. Unfortunately it only lasted 4 months before it broke, and hospital didn't want to pay to fix it.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Sep 25, 2005
9145 posts
7487 upvotes
Scarborough, ON
Got mine last year.
I don't use it for charging, but it's very convenient to throw my phones, keys, credit cards etc. in there once in a while.
Takes only 10 minutes to sanitize per run, and I definitely notice a big difference on my phone after cleaning.
Jr. Member
Jul 13, 2016
160 posts
273 upvotes
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/marketpl ... -1.5912052

If you're going to buy a germicidal UVC sanitizer, there are four important things to know:

UVC damages all tissue, but it damages eyes instantly. INSTANTLY. So do not bypass whatever interlock it has to keep the lights off while the lid is open. If you can see light, throw it in the garbage.

UVC only sterlizes, it does not clean. It will not sterilize anything under a any sort of dust, dirt, or other filth. Remember, viruses and bacteria are much smaller than dust. So items must be thoroughly cleaned BEFORE they can be sterilized.

UVC generating bulbs and LEDs wear over time. Probably faster than you expect. You must get UVC Dosimetering cards so you can test how long it actually takes to deliver the necessary sterlizing dose. "10 minutes" when you buy it might be 30 minutes ten weeks later, so you might be wasting your time. Most of these sterilizers produce a completely different dose on the top and bottom of the items inside - so you must use a Dosimetering card face down as well. Either run the unit until both sides show sterilized, or flip your item and run a second session.

Lastly, ozone can be created by the lamps and LEDs that generate germicidal UVC wavelengths. Ozone is bad for your lungs (really all tissue but mostly lungs) and degrades most flexible plastics like rubbers. So use this thing in a well ventilated area.

If you aren't going to do your own Dosimetering test, and you aren't concerned that this device is violating Health Canada regulations, then at least look at post #4 on this thread: samsung-uv-sanitizer-wireless-charging- ... 9-2424398/ which clearly shows 50 minutes per side is probably the bare minimum runtime out of the box.
Member
Sep 29, 2010
426 posts
540 upvotes
navapeers wrote: Thanks to the pandemic, these UV scanners have popped up everywhere. I personally think it's total cashgrab banking on rampant paranoia because there has not been a report that says these UV gadgets filter out Covid (if at all, some UN studies found them to ineffective with Covid). They do a good job at killing germs in general though. But then, we all did just fine without curing our phones with UV gadgets.

Just saying...
Yup.
soupmaster666 wrote: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/marketpl ... -1.5912052

If you're going to buy a germicidal UVC sanitizer, there are four important things to know:

UVC damages all tissue, but it damages eyes instantly. INSTANTLY. So do not bypass whatever interlock it has to keep the lights off while the lid is open. If you can see light, throw it in the garbage.

UVC only sterlizes, it does not clean. It will not sterilize anything under a any sort of dust, dirt, or other filth. Remember, viruses and bacteria are much smaller than dust. So items must be thoroughly cleaned BEFORE they can be sterilized.

UVC generating bulbs and LEDs wear over time. Probably faster than you expect. You must get UVC Dosimetering cards so you can test how long it actually takes to deliver the necessary sterlizing dose. "10 minutes" when you buy it might be 30 minutes ten weeks later, so you might be wasting your time. Most of these sterilizers produce a completely different dose on the top and bottom of the items inside - so you must use a Dosimetering card face down as well. Either run the unit until both sides show sterilized, or flip your item and run a second session.

Lastly, ozone can be created by the lamps and LEDs that generate germicidal UVC wavelengths. Ozone is bad for your lungs (really all tissue but mostly lungs) and degrades most flexible plastics like rubbers. So use this thing in a well ventilated area.
Great post! Most people don't know this, and most won't care to though. As is often the case, security theatre is prioritized to actual security. Same goes for healthiness.
Sr. Member
Nov 23, 2004
783 posts
1389 upvotes
Ontario
DragonRider wrote: and I definitely notice a big difference on my phone after cleaning.
This statement piqued my interest a bit - can you further explain 'how' you notice a big difference after sanitizing?

My understanding is that UV doesn't physically remove dirt or grime or anything, so does killing off bacteria and germs actually cause a noticeable difference in how a phone feels? I must be missing something here?
Deal Guru
Jun 15, 2012
14196 posts
7952 upvotes
Southern Ontario
If you don't test it, you won't know if it's actually killing any germs. You're mainly buying a wireless charger and as someone said, it doesn't clean, just look at the crud when you wipe your phone off with a damp paper towel.

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Jun 13, 2010
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GTA
DragonRider wrote: Got mine last year.
I don't use it for charging, but it's very convenient to throw my phones, keys, credit cards etc. in there once in a while.
Takes only 10 minutes to sanitize per run, and I definitely notice a big difference on my phone after cleaning.
It's 10 minutes per side, so 20 minutes per item. UV light doesn't clean it sanitizes, if your phone was dirty beforehand it will be dirty after. People won't notice any difference because bacteria and viruses aren't visible to the naked eye.
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Jul 8, 2009
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DragonRider wrote: Got mine last year.
I don't use it for charging, but it's very convenient to throw my phones, keys, credit cards etc. in there once in a while.
Takes only 10 minutes to sanitize per run, and I definitely notice a big difference on my phone after cleaning.
Ahh how do you notice a difference? It dont remove dirt or grim.
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Jun 13, 2010
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Jeremy000000 wrote: As someone who works in a hospital and used to use alcohol pads on my phone, and ID card every day after work. Wiping down is a royal pain the the ass and gets old quick. We used to have a UV sanitizer in my department and I would just throw everything in there, which was so much more convenient. Unfortunately it only lasted 4 months before it broke, and hospital didn't want to pay to fix it.
You are actually suppose to clean (wipe down) your items before sanitizing because bacteria and viruses can be underneath the 'dirt' (they can be behind a spec of dust) and won't be killed because the UV light can't reach them. You may as well just use a disinfecting wipe since you should wipe you items down before using these devices anyway.
Deal Guru
Jun 15, 2012
14196 posts
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Southern Ontario
Jeremy000000 wrote: As someone who works in a hospital and used to use alcohol pads on my phone, and ID card every day after work. Wiping down is a royal pain the the ass and gets old quick. We used to have a UV sanitizer in my department and I would just throw everything in there, which was so much more convenient. Unfortunately it only lasted 4 months before it broke, and hospital didn't want to pay to fix it.
Alcohol is less effective against C-diff, I use a damp paper towel with a dab of soap over my phone. While on the topic, we use a Scrubex machine so my ICU greens never go home and I have dedicated shoes I leave at work. I bag my coat, clothes and home shoes in my locker, don't want bed bugs in my car. Despite steam cleaning, they've been found outside isolation rooms brought in by patients.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK144042/
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Jun 13, 2010
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You need to read closely and think about Samsung's claims. On Samsung's US website it says that two testing companies found that UVC light is 99% effective at killing bacteria. They didn't say that these companies tested their sanitizer and found it to be that effective or that they tested it at all. They even posted the reports but you can't read them because they are not in focus. https://www.samsung.com/us/mobile/mobil ... 0sanitizer The sanitizers that achieve the level of effectiveness that these testing companies are talking about cost hundreds to thousands of dollars and have a much stronger UVC output than these home devices.
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Dec 4, 2009
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mindabsence wrote: My understanding is that UV doesn't physically remove dirt or grime or anything, so does killing off bacteria and germs actually cause a noticeable difference in how a phone feels? I must be missing something here?
I don't think you're missing anything at all actually.
"I'm a bit upset. I've been grab by the back without any alert and lubrification"
Lucky
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Dec 14, 2008
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They should add ability to charge ther own smart watch.
Member
Apr 10, 2011
407 posts
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I got the UV Sanitizer with my S20FE.

In theory UV kills everything, but this is not a medical grade UV machine.

I use it every day as my son need to wear a mask at school. Using the UV help a lot with the smell.

Not as good as a full clean cycle in the washer, but it get the job done.

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