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Satya Organic Eczema Relief

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Sep 22, 2012
3175 posts
2353 upvotes
Richmond Hill
@jellytime Have you tried tarcolimus (Protopic)?

Reminds me of Buckley's. It's awful, but it works.
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Feb 19, 2014
2215 posts
1129 upvotes
Toronto
JimboD wrote:
Jun 19th, 2019 1:28 am
I check in with a naturopath who I find very helpful and extremely knowledgeable who is helping me deal with my 'psoriasis' which I don't really think I have. This naturopath has me taking 4000IU's of vitamin D (which he is a believer in that 1000IU is not enough - which is usually the recommendation), fish oil and using Lanolin oil on dry areas. I've mixed the lanolin oil with vitamin D oil, it's been quite helpful.
Is your psoriasis dry, red, with cracks and bleeding? My hands are the worst and tops and bottoms of the wrist. I haven't tried lanolin oil, but i'll give it a try. Thanks for the suggestion.
rugerty100 wrote:
Jun 19th, 2019 1:32 am
@jellytime Have you tried tarcolimus (Protopic)?

Reminds me of Buckley's. It's awful, but it works.
I currently use it on my neck as i'm not supposed to use steroids there. Protopic doesn't seem to do anything for my hands, elbows, or my knees, maybe the eczema there is too severe. i'm not sure. It seems to help to a degree on my neck.
The regular steroids help for a short while, but if I use them for a prolonged period, I find it actually makes my eczema worse, so I generally don't use it longer than two weeks at a time
Sr. Member
Mar 30, 2006
805 posts
11 upvotes
Burnaby
I'd just like to share my eczema situation, hopefully it can help some of you manage your eczema:

I've had severe eczema mostly on my hands for most of my life, causing my hands to dry up and crack into painful fissues pretty much 24/7. I've repeatedly bought this up with multiple GPs, and they would always prescribe low strength topical steroids and dismiss it as uncurable. I've also tried naturopaths and TCM with no results. I eventually got a referral to a dermatologist several years ago, and he put me on the strongest topical steroid available (Clobetasol twice a day in large globs) with a moderate improvement. I was also prescribed Protopic, though it had no effect on me. My derma then suggested UV light therapy, in which I went to the derma's office thrice a week to get a UV light treatment on my hands. It was noted to have decent effect on most patients, though it had no effect on me. Next up, I was prescribed a drug called Toctino, $800CAD a month for 6 months. Supposedly good effectiveness rate for about 50% of people, but also no effect on me. It wasn't until I was prescribed methotrexate (immunosuppressant) that there was significant improvement. For the first time in decades, my eczema was somewhat controllable, though the meds wasn't a good long term solution.

My derma eventually referred me to get an allergy patch test. Recently available in Vancouver from a generous donation to St Paul's Hospital. This allergy test provided me with the most effective information for managing my eczema. I was tested with a couple hundred allergens, and was found to be severely allergic to Nickel (I was told 15% of the population had this sensitivity), chemical fragrances, thimerasol (vaccine preservative), propolis, and Palladium (wedding rings). It turns out that our environment and everyday products are laced with these materials, contributing to my constant eczema. For those interested, this allergy test is called the ACDS CAMP. After systematically eliminating/reducing said allergens, I've been able to get by with only a weak steroid cream.

For my allergies, I've found these items contributed to my ezcema:

Nickel: Coins, door knobs, cabinet knobs, electronics, faucets, cheap cutlery, stationary, belt buckles, PC mouse scroll wheels, keys, control knobs/gear shift in car, tools, AC plug prongs, usb cables, buttons on jeans, cheap jewelry, watches, batteries, dumbbell handles, etc. Can be detected using a nickel test fluid.
Mercury Thimerasol: Flu vaccine. London drugs offers a thimerasol-free version for $20
Palladium: Catalytic converters, electronics, wedding rings
Fragrance: This was my big one. Pretty much every consumer product from soaps, body washes, laundry detergent, moisturizers, toothpaste, shampoo, sunscreen has some sort of chemical fragrance, usually labelled as 'Parfum' or something similar on ingredients. Even ones that don't have 'parfum' could have a chemical fragrance disguised as another ingredient. Even though I was using hypoallergenic moisturizer, turns out I was allergic to it after I was tested with it on the patch test. I was told hypoallergenic is a marketing term and doesn't mean much. Much of the 'sensitive skin' and 'hypoallergenic' products from major brands were blacklisted by my derma.

I was also offered various other immuno-suppressants, and a recently available eczema drug called Dupixent (~$35000 a year...), but I declined since the above gave me enough relief, and the cost of course.

Hope this information can help others manage their eczema.
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Feb 19, 2014
2215 posts
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Toronto
@mjolnir117 in regards to the ACDS CAMP test, how exactly did they perform the test on you? Is this different that the test where they prick your skin with different allergens?

What do you use for soaps, laundry detergents, moisturizers, shampoo, and sunscreen then?

And thank you so much for your write up
Newbie
Dec 3, 2015
37 posts
15 upvotes
Markham
Been a pretty bad eczema sufferer myself. now i am 95% recovered naturally:

Same as most people here.. been there done that... creams... chinese doctors etc.. But the thing that helped for me was visits to the naturopathic doctor. at the worst points of my eczema it was patches on my body and mostly red patches on my face.

The thing that did it for me was elimination of dairy. First i did a sensitivity test recommended by the Naturopath doctor. (not allergy test). We found out the top foods i was sensitive to was Milk/ Dairy products. So she recommended me to stop dairy for a few months and see what it does. With food sensitivity is a bit different from allergies. When you are sensitive to the food it doesn't cause an immediate reaction it just weakens the body's immune system because it's sensitive to it.... Over time these things come out like in my case eczema.

So i stopped for a few months and got sooooooo much better. Can you imagine all the stress from all these years...
just melted away. The good news is... once your system is "cleansed" from these dairy/toxins the body builds back up to normal... and slowly you can introduce little amounts of dairy again. Like i can eat a bit of everything now no problems (just that i still try to eat the least just in case) And of cause supplements are important too... I take multivitamins and this and that to make sure my body gets a little bit more than the poor foods we eat.

So if you want to try something and save a trip to any doctors try take away Dairy for half a year.... I don't really have creams for eczema but those Zinc rash creams (cheap ones for baby rashes) are amazing to have and they last forever.

I hope it helps. I totally understand how each of you is going through... depression... etc... but do try... cause i would say its mostly food triggers.....
Sr. Member
Mar 30, 2006
805 posts
11 upvotes
Burnaby
jellytime wrote:
Jun 20th, 2019 2:48 am
@mjolnir117 in regards to the ACDS CAMP test, how exactly did they perform the test on you? Is this different that the test where they prick your skin with different allergens?

What do you use for soaps, laundry detergents, moisturizers, shampoo, and sunscreen then?

And thank you so much for your write up
No pricks. Just an allergen concentrate left on my skin for two days, personal products for a week. Attached photos.

I use nature clean and eco-max (proudly Canadian) fragrance free soap products and shampoo, eco-max fragrance-free hand soaps as body wash, 7th generation, kirkland free and clear laundry, Dermalibour moisturizer, Neutrogena Norwegian formula fragrance-free moisturizer, Shopper's drug mart 'Life' brand fragrance-free sunscreen. I find a lot of restaurant/commercial soaps fragrant as well so I carry around hand soap.

Recently experimenting with L-histamine supplements after reading article on nationaleczema. Noticed improvement, but still trying to determine if it's caused by supplements or something else.

Also found that for prescription drugs, some pharmacies (Costco) compound it with creams and ointments with fragrances. I found it best to have the derma prescribe creams in tubes made directly by manufacturer.
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