Art and Photography

Scanner for photographs

  • Last Updated:
  • Jul 18th, 2020 12:43 pm
[OP]
Member
Jan 4, 2014
443 posts
567 upvotes
Paris

Scanner for photographs

I have lots of photos (pre digital camera) and they are treasured memories. I typically scan the ones I need using my printer/scanner. Unfortunately, that's time consuming and the results are not that good. Seeking a recommendation for a good/semi-reasonable priced scanner for photos.
https://www.staples.ca/products/321476- ... ur-scanner prices differs within $30-$40 but OOS most places.
Ideas? Recommendation?
Thx
11 replies
Deal Addict
Dec 17, 2001
2493 posts
383 upvotes
Ajax
Have you tried Google photoscan?
Deal Fanatic
Jul 13, 2009
5070 posts
3251 upvotes
IslandTourGuide wrote: I have lots of photos (pre digital camera) and they are treasured memories. I typically scan the ones I need using my printer/scanner. Unfortunately, that's time consuming and the results are not that good. Seeking a recommendation for a good/semi-reasonable priced scanner for photos.
https://www.staples.ca/products/321476- ... ur-scanner prices differs within $30-$40 but OOS most places.
Ideas? Recommendation?
Thx
That's a good scanner, I have the older version v550 but really scanner tech hasn't changed in the last....10 years. Time consuming is correct but quality will be great on this.

The one annoying but important thing with scanners is keeping the glass perfectly clean, but scanners can automatically clean up images pretty well as it scans.
Deal Fanatic
Feb 16, 2006
5042 posts
2032 upvotes
Vancouver
I have the V600. I also have an Epson XP-820 multi function printer, fax, scanner. I used the V600 for a slide collection 4 or 5 years ago. Bought the XP820 for home office use a year later when the previous printer died. Have not touched the V600 since. I see no difference for most day to day scanning that I do.

Frankly, the biggest difference is in the software used to scan the image and clean up imperfections such as dust blobs during the scan process. I felt that I never mastered the software that came with the Epson V600. I would tweak it to remove certain imperfections only to find that the tweak caused another flaw in the scanned image. I spent hours just trying to get the software done right so that it would be a one pass scan of the slides.

I gave up and ended up running with a three step process. Clean the slides very carefully with a special electrostatic brush using an eye loupe, scan with settings I had found to not exacerbate issues, then post process the primary scans with other photo editing software.

PS... looks like the equivalent to the old XP-820 is the newer XP-7100 or Xp-8600. Multi ink cartridges - makes a nice print when the print head is not clogged or flooded. :rolleyes: I only use it for rough proofs before I send out images for printing elsewhere.

.
Member
Apr 9, 2012
472 posts
393 upvotes
IslandTourGuide wrote: I have lots of photos (pre digital camera) and they are treasured memories. I typically scan the ones I need using my printer/scanner. Unfortunately, that's time consuming and the results are not that good. Seeking a recommendation for a good/semi-reasonable priced scanner for photos.
https://www.staples.ca/products/321476- ... ur-scanner prices differs within $30-$40 but OOS most places.
Ideas? Recommendation?
Thx
Your information is too vague. What "photos" are you trying to scan? Positive Slides, Colour Negatives, Black & White Negatives, What size Film(s)? Prints? What size Prints? All of these?

What do you hope to do with the SCANS? Do you want a digital exact copy of the original in terms of size and resolution? Or will you use them on the web or a smartphone for viewing?

What type of file format do you want to use? Jpeg, TIFF, PDF?

What software are you using or going to use AFTER the scan? Do you plan to do any post scanning image editing or do you want the scan to be the FINAL version?

You would do well to search YouTube, the DPR Website AND THE INTERNET!!!! There is SO MUCH INFO out there already at your fingertips. Amazon also has several good books on the subject.

A flatbed scanner is just one possible tool but not always the best or worst. It "depends" if it will do the job is more dependant on the user than the equipment. You don't even need a dedicated "photo" flatbed scanner, but it depends on several factors of what you want your scan to be and to be used for and what you will do with the digital file. The best flatbed scanner is rarely needed, as most people will never make use of or even understand it's capabilities or even learn to use it or the software. Most people won't even read the manual, then they will get frustrated and quit. They often blame the scanner or it's software. They won't even look for YouTube or Mfg tutorials. Are you like that? You don't say, but you sound impatient based on the very little that you have told us.

The Epson V600 is more than good enough for scanning "prints". I use an inexpensive Canon Lide, under $100 and it's built in software to make excellent high resolution scans of photographic PRINTS up to the size limit of the scanner. I use a digital camera to make "scans" or images of larger prints and or artwork. I use a dedicated film scanner to scan film, or I use a digital camera for film that is larger than what my film scanner can handle. AND, I also use Photoshop or Affinity Photo after the scan. to fine to every scan. Time consuming, yes, but that is the nature of the process. You can buy a car already built but is a compromise or you can custom build a car to your needs. Custom is time consuming. No way around that for quality work.

Epson makes a high speed bulk print scanner but for prints under I believe, 5"x7", it's about $500-700, you can find it on the B&H website or maybe Amazon. It has rave reviews for what it does or is, but as mentioned has print size limitations. For film, dedicated film scanners or using a digital camera are usually better than flatbed scanners with film adapters. Do a web search for more info. It's a HUGE topic.

Also do a web search for VueScan software, as it's batch scanning can somewhat speed up print scanning, but it's not as easy as that. The scanner software may also allow for batch scanning prints, but you will need to read the manual and do some tests to learn how to best use it.

Don't make us guess at what you are talking about. More info is better than less when you ask someone to troubleshoot your problem or question.
[OP]
Member
Jan 4, 2014
443 posts
567 upvotes
Paris
Mtnviewer wrote: Your information is too vague. What "photos" are you trying to scan? Positive Slides, Colour Negatives, Black & White Negatives, What size Film(s)? Prints? What size Prints? All of these?

What do you hope to do with the SCANS? Do you want a digital exact copy of the original in terms of size and resolution? Or will you use them on the web or a smartphone for viewing?

What type of file format do you want to use? Jpeg, TIFF, PDF?

What software are you using or going to use AFTER the scan? Do you plan to do any post scanning image editing or do you want the scan to be the FINAL version?

You would do well to search YouTube, the DPR Website AND THE INTERNET!!!! There is SO MUCH INFO out there already at your fingertips. Amazon also has several good books on the subject.

A flatbed scanner is just one possible tool but not always the best or worst. It "depends" if it will do the job is more dependant on the user than the equipment. You don't even need a dedicated "photo" flatbed scanner, but it depends on several factors of what you want your scan to be and to be used for and what you will do with the digital file. The best flatbed scanner is rarely needed, as most people will never make use of or even understand it's capabilities or even learn to use it or the software. Most people won't even read the manual, then they will get frustrated and quit. They often blame the scanner or it's software. They won't even look for YouTube or Mfg tutorials. Are you like that? You don't say, but you sound impatient based on the very little that you have told us.

The Epson V600 is more than good enough for scanning "prints". I use an inexpensive Canon Lide, under $100 and it's built in software to make excellent high resolution scans of photographic PRINTS up to the size limit of the scanner. I use a digital camera to make "scans" or images of larger prints and or artwork. I use a dedicated film scanner to scan film, or I use a digital camera for film that is larger than what my film scanner can handle. AND, I also use Photoshop or Affinity Photo after the scan. to fine to every scan. Time consuming, yes, but that is the nature of the process. You can buy a car already built but is a compromise or you can custom build a car to your needs. Custom is time consuming. No way around that for quality work.

Epson makes a high speed bulk print scanner but for prints under I believe, 5"x7", it's about $500-700, you can find it on the B&H website or maybe Amazon. It has rave reviews for what it does or is, but as mentioned has print size limitations. For film, dedicated film scanners or using a digital camera are usually better than flatbed scanners with film adapters. Do a web search for more info. It's a HUGE topic.

Also do a web search for VueScan software, as it's batch scanning can somewhat speed up print scanning, but it's not as easy as that. The scanner software may also allow for batch scanning prints, but you will need to read the manual and do some tests to learn how to best use it.

Don't make us guess at what you are talking about. More info is better than less when you ask someone to troubleshoot your problem or question.
Thanks for the lecture.
I asked for photos. Never did ask for negatives, slides...
It was a simple request. Scanning photos to save. Maybe, I should have indicated developed prints.
Deal Addict
Nov 24, 2004
4530 posts
1093 upvotes
Toronto
Pretty much all flatbed scanners will perform well for ordinary photographic prints, if set up correctly. The only benefit I could see is if the scanner in question has a dedicated print feeder, but that's really a specialized tool.

The real challenge is in the post-processing -- adjusting colour, contrast, cropping, etc. The whole process is very time consuming.

The Epson V600 scanner posted by the OP is a great device, especially for film scanning. But consider that you could instead pay Staples that equivalent amount of money and get them to scan ~2,000 photos for you: https://www.staplescopyandprint.ca/phot ... vices.aspx You just come back a few days later and pick up the USB stick with the files on it.

I did something similar (not with Staples, but with another company) last year and it was worth every penny. We had about 2,200 family photos, some from the very early 20th c., digitized. Made online galleries from the files and sent them to all the aunts, uncles, and cousins. It worked really well. I shudder to think about how long it would have taken to scan them all myself.
[OP]
Member
Jan 4, 2014
443 posts
567 upvotes
Paris
JHW wrote:
But consider that you could instead pay Staples that equivalent amount of money and get them to scan ~2,000 photos for you: https://www.staplescopyandprint.ca/phot ... vices.aspx You just come back a few days later and pick up the USB stick with the files on it.
@JHW. Thanks very much for your suggestion. I think that's the route I will take. Saves me time and they may do a much better job than I can.
Appreciated
Deal Addict
Nov 24, 2004
4530 posts
1093 upvotes
Toronto
IslandTourGuide wrote: @JHW. Thanks very much for your suggestion. I think that's the route I will take. Saves me time and they may do a much better job than I can.
Appreciated
I'm not saying that Staples itself is necessarily the best option (do your research) but IMHO scanning services are well worth the cost, unless one's time is absolutely worthless to them.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Sep 1, 2005
17959 posts
12637 upvotes
Markham
For large quantities, I find super high quality is not necessary. Truth of the matter is those photos will not be very highly treasured by the next generation and even less so by the generation after that. All you want to do is create a library that you can distribute to each person and it is there's to do what they want with it...they likely will never look at them. Take the best pics that you treasure and do higher level scans of those and only those (likely to be used for a photostory at funerals).

The future is ppl looking at photos on PC/TV screens and the pictures are not going to be blown up to poster size ever. In such a situation, speed and reasonable quality are the two biggest wants/needs.

I have a Fujitsu scanner auto feed straight line scanner that will auto adjust if not autofed in straight and it's phenomenally quick at scanning. Quality is reasonable as well IMO.
We're all bozos on the bus until we find a way to express ourselves...

Failure is always an option...just not the preferred one!
Deal Addict
Nov 24, 2004
4530 posts
1093 upvotes
Toronto
^ That scanner looks fantastic, but again, if you're going to pay that much (looks like it costs about $750) you have to consider whether it might be better to just use a service.

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