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Seal the gap between drywall and concrete in the garage

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[OP]
Jr. Member
Sep 10, 2006
149 posts
44 upvotes
Toronto

Seal the gap between drywall and concrete in the garage

Hi Guys,

I am working on a project to finish my garage.
The current status is a level 2 finish by the builder and I would like to apply additional coats + paint.
Running into a problem and hope someone can shed some light -
The drywall goes off from the concrete block about 1/2'' (pictures attached). Originally, the builder just covered it with some drywall tapes. It already started to fell off due to all the moisture absorbed by the concrete.
So I peeled off the tapes and started to think of the best way to make it sealed and air-tight.

What are the options?
I am thinking about either backer-rod + dynaflex 230, or spray with thegreatstuff and trim the edge?
Could there be any other options?

Thanks a lot for your advice!
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13 replies
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 8, 2009
1429 posts
447 upvotes
Brampton
What are you planning to do to the concrete portion. I am in the same boat and was thinking of parging it to make it smooth and then paint it using concrete paint. What are your ideas?
[OP]
Jr. Member
Sep 10, 2006
149 posts
44 upvotes
Toronto
dealerguy wrote: What are you planning to do to the concrete portion. I am in the same boat and was thinking of parging it to make it smooth and then paint it using concrete paint. What are your ideas?
same here. probably grind it and apply epoxy together with the concrete floor
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 24, 2006
2802 posts
1548 upvotes
Barrie
Per code it needs to be airtight. My builder used silicon to seal up mine
[OP]
Jr. Member
Sep 10, 2006
149 posts
44 upvotes
Toronto
RunnerForDeals wrote: Per code it needs to be airtight. My builder used silicon to seal up mine
Thanks! I dont think the drywall tape used by my cheap builder is very airtight.
I will consider using silicone but the gap is just a bit too wide
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Oct 12, 2007
6022 posts
3578 upvotes
Ottawa
I would consider a strip of wood kind of like an upside-down moulding and as a transition from the non-flush drywall to the concrete - it would protect the bottom of the drywall from damage. That would be on top of a silicon seal. If the strip is backed by a good PL, it wouldn't require too many tapcon screws to hold it firmly in place.

Also, I personally would paint the concrete before I would parge - parging can look awful within a few years and it's very difficult to patch. I had been thinking of using cementboard sheets (and then painted) to cover mine which have spalled slightly over the years but I can live with the concrete foundation - after all, it's a garage.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 24, 2006
2802 posts
1548 upvotes
Barrie
No.6 wrote: Thanks! I dont think the drywall tape used by my cheap builder is very airtight.
I will consider using silicone but the gap is just a bit too wide
There is no gap that is "too big". You just need to follow the right steps. Take a look at this page for inspiration. https://www.familyhandyman.com/project/ ... te-cracks/

As long as you have the foam backing rod you will be just fine. https://www.homedepot.ca/product/m-d-bu ... 1001516864
Deal Expert
User avatar
Feb 11, 2007
17352 posts
19404 upvotes
Oakville
No.6 wrote: Hi Guys,

I am working on a project to finish my garage.
The current status is a level 2 finish by the builder and I would like to apply additional coats + paint.
Running into a problem and hope someone can shed some light -
The drywall goes off from the concrete block about 1/2'' (pictures attached). Originally, the builder just covered it with some drywall tapes. It already started to fell off due to all the moisture absorbed by the concrete.
So I peeled off the tapes and started to think of the best way to make it sealed and air-tight.

What are the options?
I am thinking about either backer-rod + dynaflex 230, or spray with thegreatstuff and trim the edge?
Could there be any other options?

Thanks a lot for your advice!
Both of your ideas are good, so go with one of them.
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.

Selling 18x8 Winter Wheels/Tires 225/60R-18 for Audi Q5, A5, Mercedes, PM for info, lots of tread.
https://www.kijiji.ca/v-view-details.ht ... 1589757439
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jun 12, 2008
3005 posts
669 upvotes
Ancaster
Great question OP....I have this exact issue and looking to resolve it as well.

CaptSmethwick had a good idea with a transition piece of trim. He mentioned wood but if you could also use the PVC vinyl trim (although pricier). As he also mentioned, I would stay away from parging as it doesn't last and becomes a new maintenance issue over time...I know firsthand as I'm dealing with this on my exterior foundation.

OP and others, whatever you decide to do could you post pics of your solutions.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Feb 11, 2007
17352 posts
19404 upvotes
Oakville
nielboy wrote: Great question OP....I have this exact issue and looking to resolve it as well.

CaptSmethwick had a good idea with a transition piece of trim. He mentioned wood but if you could also use the PVC vinyl trim (although pricier). As he also mentioned, I would stay away from parging as it doesn't last and becomes a new maintenance issue over time...I know firsthand as I'm dealing with this on my exterior foundation.

OP and others, whatever you decide to do could you post pics of your solutions.
Yea, wood is a bad idea as moisture could wick from the concrete to the drywall. However OP does it, it should be a waterproof product (foam, vinyl, etc).
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.

Selling 18x8 Winter Wheels/Tires 225/60R-18 for Audi Q5, A5, Mercedes, PM for info, lots of tread.
https://www.kijiji.ca/v-view-details.ht ... 1589757439
Deal Addict
Nov 21, 2007
2780 posts
772 upvotes
Scarborough
I would use the foam sealant for large gap only. Tape (2") the concrete just below the gap for easy cleanup after applying. Back rod would still be susceptible to rusting from the moisture leeching.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Oct 12, 2007
6022 posts
3578 upvotes
Ottawa
I agree non wood is better if OP considers the trim route.

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