Entrepreneurship & Small Business

Serving Papers on Condo resident

  • Last Updated:
  • Mar 22nd, 2018 1:58 pm
[OP]
Member
Jul 31, 2017
223 posts
176 upvotes
Toronto

Serving Papers on Condo resident

I have to serve small claims court papers on someone who lives in a Condo. They have a concierge service there, so can I get the concierge to sign for delivery and that will be acceptable to the court or do I have to actually mail/courier them instead. Strange as it may seem, i've never set foot in a condo before and have no idea how the front desk system works!

Thanks!
9 replies
Sr. Member
Sep 16, 2006
899 posts
178 upvotes
Pickering
How do you not know this? You have to serve the papers yourself, obviously. To the person. Not the concierge.
[OP]
Member
Jul 31, 2017
223 posts
176 upvotes
Toronto
Actually that isn't true..

Defence and Other Documents
8.01(14) The following documents may be served by mail, by courier, by fax, personally as provided in rule 8.02 or by an alternative to personal service as provided in rule 8.03, unless the court orders otherwise:

A defence.


However, thanks for your erroneous contribution
Newbie
Jan 6, 2018
31 posts
5 upvotes
Just go to the condo and see if the front desk accepts the documents. It's different for each condo. My current condo officially won't accept packages that is not from a courier like canada post, fedex, ups, etc. A random person can't just drop off a package.

That being said, I have received mail meant for someone else and dropped off those letters at the front desk.
Sr. Member
Sep 16, 2006
899 posts
178 upvotes
Pickering
BoatyMcBoatface wrote: Actually that isn't true..

Defence and Other Documents
8.01(14) The following documents may be served by mail, by courier, by fax, personally as provided in rule 8.02 or by an alternative to personal service as provided in rule 8.03, unless the court orders otherwise:

A defence.


However, thanks for your erroneous contribution
Maybe you could have just used google instead of starting this thread, then. ;)
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 15, 2015
1568 posts
195 upvotes
Markham, ON
Are you serving someone you know personally? If so, it might be good to serve in person just so that you know that person has been served?

If someone is making a claim against me, I want to know who and why.

If some paper just arrive with no explanation whatsoever and that person has never been sued before and in fact did not know something wrong happened. I would imagine It's terrifying.

I guess while you are making your claim, you can see if you actually have anything to claim. And if your point is valid.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Mar 23, 2008
11349 posts
7655 upvotes
Edmonton
Poppwl wrote: Are you serving someone you know personally? If so, it might be good to serve in person just so that you know that person has been served?

If someone is making a claim against me, I want to know who and why.

If some paper just arrive with no explanation whatsoever and that person has never been sued before and in fact did not know something wrong happened. I would imagine It's terrifying.

I guess while you are making your claim, you can see if you actually have anything to claim. And if your point is valid.
You typically don’t serve papers on someone you want to have beers with next Friday. You serve papers on someone you want to sue, and frankly, I’d prefer to have them pooping bricks.

Plus all the information they need is included in the paperwork.

C
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 15, 2015
1568 posts
195 upvotes
Markham, ON
CNeufeld wrote: You typically don’t serve papers on someone you want to have beers with next Friday. You serve papers on someone you want to sue, and frankly, I’d prefer to have them pooping bricks.

Plus all the information they need is included in the paperwork.

C
Yes, you don't serve paper on someone you want to have beer with on Friday because the two of you renegotiate every Friday so you don't have to end up in court and have to deal with cumbersome paper that makes no sense to you whatsoever (especially when you are drunk or tipsy)
Newbie
Mar 1, 2018
45 posts
11 upvotes
There are allowances for alternate service, i.e registered mail etc, check with your local small claims court
[OP]
Member
Jul 31, 2017
223 posts
176 upvotes
Toronto
Thanks, I ended up couriering the papers to his condo address and as the signature was not someone from his family, I am assuming the concierge signed for them. The court seemed to accept this as evidence of service so i'm good to go. It was actually a defence, I think the plaintiff serving may have stricter requirements.

Top