Computers & Electronics

Shaw Internet can't handle livestreaming?

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Dec 11, 2009
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Shaw Internet can't handle livestreaming?

I've just started livestreaming and two times already my Shaw internet has dropped for 30 mins to 1 hour. The modem also gets unusually hot. It's the Hitron CGNM-2250. My internet plan is Internet 300.

What would be my best option? Shaw support recommended an upgrade to the Bluecurve modem at "up to 10 Gbps downstream and up to 1 Gbps upstream".

Or should I buy my own router and go into bridged mode? Or any other suggestions?

Thanks!
“There are two sorts of people. The players and the pieces.” ~ Petyr Baelish
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If you mean that you are uploading the stream, then you have to keep in mind that your upload rate is much lower than your download rate with cable internet. With Internet 300 you actually get "up to 20 mbps" upload, usually a bit less. It's unlikely though that a video stream upload would come anywhere close to 20 mbps. Even a high-res upload stream is probably only a few mbps. But you should check what your upload rate is.

The capacity of the modem should not be an issue, and the suggestion from Shaw support that changing to their new modem would help is just silly. The modems always get hot in use,

Most likely the issue is that Shaw and other cable internet providers really don't like continuous heavy upload, because their upload capacity on a node is really very limited and they don't want individual users hogging it. They don't like to talk about it, but they do implement automatic throttling in any situation where they feel a resource is being over-used. If that's the case, Shaw customer service are unlikely to tell you so. The only solutions would be to buy a more expensive plan to scale up your allowed upload capacity, or to dump Shaw and go with Telus fibre with symmetrical upload speed.
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Scote64 wrote: Most likely the issue is that Shaw and other cable internet providers really don't like continuous heavy upload, because their upload capacity on a node is really very limited and they don't want individual users hogging it. They don't like to talk about it, but they do implement automatic throttling in any situation where they feel a resource is being over-used. If that's the case, Shaw customer service are unlikely to tell you so. The only solutions would be to buy a more expensive plan to scale up your allowed upload capacity, or to dump Shaw and go with Telus fibre with symmetrical upload speed.
Thanks for the reply. Does my internet cutting out for 30 mins - 1 hour sound like throttling? When I think of throttling I think of very limited speed.

I should mention my stream set-up is a two person stream with two separate computers using NDI over ethernet, which uses a lot of the network.

Also something else I should mention is that when my internet cut out I unplugged the router, and then when I plugged it back in, before the internet had a chance to connect, I instantly saw the NDI feed of my other computer before the feed cut out a few seconds later as the internet was still not working.

I'm not sure if that affects your answer.
“There are two sorts of people. The players and the pieces.” ~ Petyr Baelish
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LionheartMG wrote: Also something else I should mention is that when my internet cut out I unplugged the router, and then when I plugged it back in, before the internet had a chance to connect, I instantly saw the NDI feed of my other computer before the feed cut out a few seconds later as the internet was still not working.
That certainly sounds like more of a local problem. Maybe you need to disconnect from the internet and get the feed working reliably over the LAN from one computer to the other.

When you say the internet cut out for 30 minutes, are you sure it was the internet that was out, not just just your video feed?
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Scote64 wrote: That certainly sounds like more of a local problem. Maybe you need to disconnect from the internet and get the feed working reliably over the LAN from one computer to the other.

When you say the internet cut out for 30 minutes, are you sure it was the internet that was out, not just just your video feed?
It was 100% the internet, the feed works perfectly until the internet cuts out. Then even my phone doesn't have internet. My friend nearby has Shaw and their internet wasn't down. That's why I'm leaning toward thinking it's the router. When I google "router overheat" I get a lot of hits.
“There are two sorts of people. The players and the pieces.” ~ Petyr Baelish
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Maybe? I think my modem is a Hitron and I've never heard of it overheating. I do have it in bridge mode (this disables router function so it acts as a modem only).

If it overheated you'd think it'd turn itself off or something.

I would call Shaw and see if they can troubleshoot... maybe it is a defective modem. I was thinking Wi-Fi interference, but that doesn't make internet vanish for 30 minutes, it usually causes it to slow down. Have you tried an ethernet cable to a device to see if you can rule out that its wifi issues?
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zod wrote: I would call Shaw and see if they can troubleshoot...
That's not likely to be helpful. Like most ISPs, Shaw are terrible at diagnostics. Most of their support staff have little training, no logical diagnostic thinking ability, and not enough time to do proper diagnostic tests. At best they will suggest a couple of check-list items - Are you sure it's plugged in? Can you visit the Shaw test site? - that sort of level. They will not help you diagnose upload video feeds. At best they will suggest replacing the modem, which will waste a lot of time if it's not the modem. Not to say that it might not be a defective modem, but it would be best to run some more thorough diagnostic tests before going there.

For the OP: you need to break the problem down a bit to be sure you are diagnosing it correctly.
- Is there any problem if you are not running your live feeds? Test long enough to be sure.
- Does the modem get "hot" to your touch in normal operation without the live feeds?
- Start up one live feed (not both) and run for a while. Any problem? Can you see that live feed on the LAN from your phone or another computer? Is there any issue if you watch it for a while? Does the modem heat up? (I have to wonder why your live feed is generating any traffic at all unless someone is watching it or recording it. It won't be sending data anywhere unless it's connected to a viewer.)
- If no problem with one feed, add the 2nd one and see it the problem happens. If so, does the modem feel hotter? If one feed alone causes a problem, then forget the 2nd one for the purposes of testing and continue testing with one feed to simplify things.
- Can you reduce the video bandwidth of the feed to test with a lower data rate? If so, see if that makes a difference. You could also try turning the feed off and on at an interval less than the time the problem occurs to create a lower average data rate, but reduced bandwidth would be better.
- Monitor your internet connection while doing live streaming, possibly by connecting to a web site that streams to you - audio would be fine as a monitor, like an internet radio station or music service. If the download stream stops, immediately test your LAN connection first to see if the router has stopped working locally (ping another IP address on the network for example), and if the LAN is ok then check your internet connection to see if only the WAN/internet side is down. Run an internet speed test for example - try both something like fast.com and Shaw's own speed test site - if Shaw has shut you down at their end, they might possibly still allow you to hit their speed test server.
- If your internet does appear to be out in both directions, then check the status lights on the front of your modem (take a photo). Those status lights tell you whether your modem is operating, whether it is seeing carrier signal on the cable, whether it has a data connection allocated on the local Shaw node, whether it is actively communicating up or down with the node, and whether the LAN ports are active. You can look them up in the Hitron modem guide online. If the lights don't look right, then you will have something clear to report to Shaw.

If you do those diagnostics, then you will be able to say with some certainty that either it is a fault in the modem, or it's something else you need to diagnose, like a local software problem. If it is a fault in the modem, then you can tell Shaw that you want it replaced ASAP and give them clear evidence that it's faulty. They will still likely want you to waste some time on their superficial checklist, but at least you'll know that you're doing the right thing without waiting another few weeks to figure out that the modem wasn't the problem.
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Scote64 wrote: That's not likely to be helpful. Like most ISPs, Shaw are terrible at diagnostics. Most of their support staff have little training, no logical diagnostic thinking ability, and not enough time to do proper diagnostic tests. At best they will suggest a couple of check-list items - Are you sure it's plugged in? Can you visit the Shaw test site? - that sort of level. They will not help you diagnose upload video feeds. At best they will suggest replacing the modem, which will waste a lot of time if it's not the modem. Not to say that it might not be a defective modem, but it would be best to run some more thorough diagnostic tests before going there.
That part I realized. Tech support is super annoying, but eventually they'd blame the modem and send a new one because that's there only goto if they can't solve the issue :)

It would be helpful if the OP provided more details. Wi-Fi vs. Wired, is the modem actually running hot, has he tried running speedtests after the video craps out, what happens if he resets the modem/router by unplugging/plugging it back in etc....

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