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Should I take the jump?

  • Last Updated:
  • Aug 15th, 2017 11:01 am
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[OP]
Newbie
May 18, 2015
34 posts
12 upvotes

Should I take the jump?

I need some advice. I'm not looking for a straight answer of yes or no, because at the end of the day, it's only me who can make the decision but I am just looking for different perspective.
I currently for work the federal government. I graduated from social work just over 2 years ago and worked as an Employment Counsellor for a good year and a half. I jumped ship to take an entry level position in the public service biecause it was a bit more money, and the working conditions at my previous jobs just went down hill. My current position is great. I get all these opportunities to grow and learn new things and take on new challenges. The only aspect I don't truly enjoy is being stuck on the phones (it's the call centre for EI) so I take every opportunity that's thrown at me, so coaching peers, to training, and I am trying to obtain a Team Leader position (although it's hard because it's really about who you know). But anyways, to get to the point: I spoke with an old professor of mine and they are looking to hire a part time prof to teach a course. I am going to submit my name for a change at the job and see where it goes. If it's a night class, great cause I can keep my FT job and teach on the side.

She also sent me a posting for a position at the college, as an Establishment worker. Which means working with immigrants moving to the city and help them adjust and provide the necessary help and services. This position pays more than my current one. Right now I sit at 51K, and in a couple months I get a raise. The new position is 30$/hr. But it's also only a contract from August 2017, to March 2018. With a possibility of extension. I'm always looking for new challenges and looking to open new doors. Do you think I should take the jump and go for it and risk not having a job in pass March 31st 2018 to gain experience? Or would you suggest sticking with the government and work my way up within the department, and eventually move into a different one? I've always been afraid of taking risks, and this would mean getting way out of my comfort zone. I just want different perspectives.

Thanks!
28 replies
Sr. Member
Jun 1, 2008
721 posts
245 upvotes
Richmond Hill
I'd teach on the side and keep the job.
Deal Addict
Oct 16, 2013
2408 posts
764 upvotes
New Brunswick
You can teach on the side .Which school is it?
[OP]
Newbie
May 18, 2015
34 posts
12 upvotes
That is true. The pension is a good aspect to have and think of because lots of jobs now don't even offer pension plans. The teaching gig is with College Boreal. I could always apply and see, and if it works out with my schedule, then I could give it a shot. I am just afraid of applying for the second job because it's a contract; and that doesn't include benefits.
Deal Addict
Apr 18, 2017
1051 posts
919 upvotes
Toronto
Back in the end of 2015, I left a full time permanent job and took on a 6 month contract with another company which I felt the experience was much better in terms of where I wanted to go. I left 4 months into my contract because I didn't really like my manager there and I got offered another 6 month contract with another company, same position. After 5 months into my new contract, I was made permanent and it was more relevant with what I wanted to do, 18k more money than what I was making at my last permanent job, better benefits and much better career opportunities.

So it did work out for me and I was in a similar situation as you were deciding whether I should leave a permanent position for a contract. And I am sure glad I did.
Deal Addict
Sep 22, 2013
2339 posts
1475 upvotes
Still with the Feds. You can move up to other roles after you put some time in or move to other levels of the Government that pay a lot better (such as the Province).

I was working were you were 4 years ago and I'm essentially at double the pay in a completely different role so it is possible to move on within a short period of time.
Newbie
User avatar
Aug 6, 2017
22 posts
5 upvotes
Toronto, Canada
One question to consider: which option would you regret if you didn't take?

If you stay, you'd probably be left wondering. There will eventually be another opportunity. Perhaps better, perhaps worse than this one. If it's worse, you might say "doh, should have done the previous one". If it's better, then you might say "doh, should have made the decision to move earlier". OR you could commit to making the best of your current opportunities and get to where you want to be in your current organization.
If you go, it might go well post Mar 2018, or it might not. if it goes poorly, perhaps you can go back to your old job and cross back over bridges that you hopefully didn't burn. you'll lose a little in the pension calculations. If it goes well, then you might still be wondering what could have been had you stayed. OR you could commit to making the best of the new situation and do what it takes to make yourself happy with your new opportunities.

I'd suggest, whatever you decide, do it wholeheartedly. Some people spend time worrying about "making the right decision", versus "making the decision right"... not my quote, but can't recall who I heard it from so if you have a proper attribution, let me know.
Deal Addict
Jul 21, 2005
2038 posts
1091 upvotes
Alberta
Gee wrote: Federal government has a pension. You want to give that up?
Probably won't be around when you are ready to collect.....go bankrupt.

I was in a similar position as the OP, with a government pension, and I gave it all up.

For one, pension isn't all it's cracked up to be. For example, when I first started working at the government, our pension deductions were at 10%, every paycheque, by the time I quit 7 years later (across multiple gov agencies), I was paying 18%....every single year they kept increasing the % of contribution, because too many old people were retiring and the funds were running dry, so they sucked it all out of us. When I quit it was at 18%, that was 3 years ago, don't really know what it's at now. For me, after you work for 2 full years, you get your and government contribution when you quit, so it was a nice big cheque to transfer into a LIRA, and manage it as you please, vs mismanagement at the government level.

Regarding the job...I had a solid, pretty much guaranteed job with the government, and I quit to take a chance at something more exciting. My job was steady, but I became bored in a smaller agency. An option came up for a 6 month contract elsewhere, where I had a friend working, who was also a contractor there at first, but got converted to full time. I took a chance, and after 6 month contract, they extended me for another year...and 8 month into the next year offered me full time. I have been full time there for 2 years now, and loving it, love going to work, love working there in a much more interesting environment and with great people. So OP, sometimes you got to get out of your comfort zone and take a chance, might be the best decision you will ever make, you just never know. After 2 other office jobs up to this point in my life. I finally found a place where I think I will be a lifer (i'm 33 by the way). Also, not having to pay 18% every paycheque, and the raise I got, I am bringing 2K more per month after taxes, which I can do what I want with, instead of going into some pension I may never see to support the lifestyle of the old employees.
Newbie
Jul 12, 2017
12 posts
1 upvote
Do not quit. Take both the things side by side.
Deal Addict
Jun 27, 2005
1069 posts
147 upvotes
Toronto, ON
For me the answer is more in the actual job itself - I keep tabs on my career goals based on 'what' I want to do - now and in the future. If the contract job is more in-line with what you want to do and with a company you want to work for, I'd take it - at that salary range, it isn't a huge enough difference (another poster mentioned it's pretty much the same taking into consideration benefits, which I agree) to matter.

If not, keep your current job and keep looking internally or otherwise.
[OP]
Newbie
May 18, 2015
34 posts
12 upvotes
Thanks for the input guys, I just need a lot of soul searching and exploration to do. I am not sure what I want to do. I am the type of person who is willing to try anything. What happens with this government job is that Its really about sitting down at a desk and taking calls all day. Its close to impossible to become a manager because there is only 2 of them, and the competition is high. I took this job for the money, but deep down I don't think this will be forever. Its pretty soul sucking. Its not a job I wake up in the morning and am excited to go to.
Last edited by JesseS887 on Aug 8th, 2017 3:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Jr. Member
Nov 3, 2011
159 posts
28 upvotes
Toronto
Academia jobs are precarious (just search "Canadian academic jobs precarious" or something like that).
Full-time post-secondary teaching jobs are hard to come by these days.
Do not give up the stability of the government job.
Do both if you can (one for fulfilment and one for the stability), but I wouldn't give up the government job.
I am currently in academia as a part-time instructor--and have been part-time for over 10 years.
Deal Addict
Nov 8, 2005
3202 posts
2692 upvotes
The person who said the pension isn't all it's cracked up to be is out to lunch. Doesn't matter if you're being deducted 18% for your pension, you're still coming out way on top in the end.

Unless you truly despise going to work and can't see any silver lining in your current job, I'd only leave your job for another public service job. The benefits, pension, and job security are worth a tonne. Don't let anyone tell you that these things are not valuable, because they are the key to stability for your entire life.
Deal Addict
May 28, 2005
2418 posts
364 upvotes
I worked in the EI Call Centre and absolutely hated it. If you can stick it out and wait for internal openings then do it. But in my experience, whenever any opened up internally the entire office applied. I was on the Job Mastery team, coaching training as well. But being on the phones 90% of the time for a year got to me. I couldn't imagine doing it for another 2-3 years before moving on. Honestly if you're young or early in your career I would make the jump. You can always get back into Service Canada...they hire all the time.
...
[OP]
Newbie
May 18, 2015
34 posts
12 upvotes
Wilmega wrote: I worked in the EI Call Centre and absolutely hated it. If you can stick it out and wait for internal openings then do it. But in my experience, whenever any opened up internally the entire office applied. I was on the Job Mastery team, coaching training as well. But being on the phones 90% of the time for a year got to me. I couldn't imagine doing it for another 2-3 years before moving on. Honestly if you're young or early in your career I would make the jump. You can always get back into Service Canada...they hire all the time.
Thanks for your input! It is getting to me. I am trying to stick it out until I can find something else.I sit by the window and stare out all day long. It is such a tedious job. Very mundane. I feel like it's the type of job people take just to sit and collect a pension. Some people have been here for 20 years, and I have no idea how they managed it.

I was thinking of even jumping ship and getting into banking. Yes it would be a drastic pay cut for a bit, but short term gain for long term gain. I just can't do this for much longer.
Last edited by JesseS887 on Aug 9th, 2017 1:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Deal Addict
May 28, 2005
2418 posts
364 upvotes
The other thing about EI that really bothered me, all the errors and misinformation that was created by our own staff. I hated having to deal with upset clients because another CSO misinformed them. I had to train two CSO's who were coming back from Maternity leave. One of them was awesome but the other just had a horrible attitude and didn't care about servicing the clients. The salary is good early on but I would of capped out on the payscale at around $54k (back in 2010)
...
Deal Addict
Jul 21, 2005
2038 posts
1091 upvotes
Alberta
tim-x wrote: The person who said the pension isn't all it's cracked up to be is out to lunch. Doesn't matter if you're being deducted 18% for your pension, you're still coming out way on top in the end.

Unless you truly despise going to work and can't see any silver lining in your current job, I'd only leave your job for another public service job. The benefits, pension, and job security are worth a tonne. Don't let anyone tell you that these things are not valuable, because they are the key to stability for your entire life.
I said it, and I stand by my word. You sound like a perfect government employee, and that's one thing I hated working at the government for, noone gave a crap about anything, they were all there to ride it out for the pension. They have no motivation to do any better because they know they are secure, they are just counting down the days until they retire with their pension. Not gonna lie, once I lose all ambition in life and ready to retire, i will most likely be looking for a government job, it's perfect for that purpose. If you are smart with your money, you won't need a pension from the government when the time comes, you will be much better off, especially given the fact that you get all that extra money NOW to invest as you please.
[OP]
Newbie
May 18, 2015
34 posts
12 upvotes
Wilmega wrote: The other thing about EI that really bothered me, all the errors and misinformation that was created by our own staff. I hated having to deal with upset clients because another CSO misinformed them. I had to train two CSO's who were coming back from Maternity leave. One of them was awesome but the other just had a horrible attitude and didn't care about servicing the clients. The salary is good early on but I would of capped out on the payscale at around $54k (back in 2010)
oh I know. It's like that every day. You cap out pretty quick. They just signed the new collective agreement and we cap out at just below 59K I think. But the duties itself is just mundane and soul numbing. i really appreciate your input!
Deal Guru
User avatar
Jul 12, 2003
12353 posts
4864 upvotes
Toronto
Wilmega wrote: I worked in the EI Call Centre and absolutely hated it. If you can stick it out and wait for internal openings then do it. But in my experience, whenever any opened up internally the entire office applied. I was on the Job Mastery team, coaching training as well. But being on the phones 90% of the time for a year got to me. I couldn't imagine doing it for another 2-3 years before moving on. Honestly if you're young or early in your career I would make the jump. You can always get back into Service Canada...they hire all the time.
LOL, so true. I worked in a call center for a big 5 bank and it was the same.
Everyone hates to be on the phone, break, lunch are logged. Calls get pulls for review....then coaching.
Most agents hate their job and apply internally once there is an opening elsewhere in a different dept.

True about OP's statement. Is not about what you know but who you know in order to get promotion to an higher level.
Retired Forum Moderator February 2009 - June 2015

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