Personal Finance

Simple Tax - Didn’t submit my Child Care Expenses

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  • May 1st, 2021 6:12 pm
[OP]
Deal Addict
Nov 25, 2007
3488 posts
951 upvotes
Toronto

Simple Tax - Didn’t submit my Child Care Expenses

Hey all, just wondering...

I submitted Child Care Dependents and the expenses in my Simple Tax. I looked back at my document just now and it never filed a T778 form and never entered the expenses in the 21400 line.

Has anyone else experienced this? I am thinking it’s a bug...
4 replies
Deal Addict
User avatar
Sep 29, 2003
4855 posts
425 upvotes
GTA
mine showed up.. did u do joint?
[OP]
Deal Addict
Nov 25, 2007
3488 posts
951 upvotes
Toronto
I did not make a joint. Both of our taxes are separate.

I am entering it in “My Dependents”, and underneath that, “Child Expenses”. I am only adding the Name, and expense. Net 0 calculation, and in the PDF, there’s nothing with child care.

It’s strange, I think my profile is bugged.

Edit: Figured it out! SimpleTax thought my wife’s income was higher than mine (despite not providing any information), so I had to file my income with hers. Now it’s good.
Deal Fanatic
Oct 26, 2008
6447 posts
2114 upvotes
BC
This gets a bit confusing ......

Married or common-law couples in Canada HAVE to file their returns separately. CRA does not offer joint filing like some other countries do (e.g. U.S.)

However, tax filing software such as Simple Tax provides 'coupling' of returns for optimization prior to actually invoking Netfile separate for the returns.

The Vancouver team that developed Simple Tax almost certainly did everything correctly, but some of the changes to accommodate WealthSimple might have introduced complexity when identifying individuals.

In a somewhat related example, I have a joint bank savings account with my daughter. When declaring the proportion of interest received by each of us, CRA can handle the declaration in a straightforward manner.
WealthSimple Tax OTOH seems to erroneously try to interrelate or 'couple' the returns for this. I gave up trying to get past it and had to declare all the interest on my own return.
It wasn't a large amount, so no big deal.
I could be wrong, but it does seem that WealthSimple's understandable preoccupation with encouraging Simple Tax users to start using other WealthSimple products is a factor in how they frame tax customers in 'accounts' and 'profiles'.
Deal Fanatic
Jan 19, 2017
5642 posts
3154 upvotes
macnut wrote: This gets a bit confusing ......

Married or common-law couples in Canada HAVE to file their returns separately. CRA does not offer joint filing like some other countries do (e.g. U.S.)

However, tax filing software such as Simple Tax provides 'coupling' of returns for optimization prior to actually invoking Netfile separate for the returns.

The Vancouver team that developed Simple Tax almost certainly did everything correctly, but some of the changes to accommodate WealthSimple might have introduced complexity when identifying individuals.

In a somewhat related example, I have a joint bank savings account with my daughter. When declaring the proportion of interest received by each of us, CRA can handle the declaration in a straightforward manner.
WealthSimple Tax OTOH seems to erroneously try to interrelate or 'couple' the returns for this. I gave up trying to get past it and had to declare all the interest on my own return.
It wasn't a large amount, so no big deal.
I could be wrong, but it does seem that WealthSimple's understandable preoccupation with encouraging Simple Tax users to start using other WealthSimple products is a factor in how they frame tax customers in 'accounts' and 'profiles'.
It is a confusion when people talking about joint tax filing. You are correct that each person files tax separately , even for a married couple. Studiotax uses the term linked returns for a married couple. This way it still files each return separately , but the software determines who should get deductions and/or credits which are income based for a couple. Also a linked return file would automatically determine which person can claim the other spouse if the other spouse has low income, etc.

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