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Soffits - Remove old wood soffits before replacing with Alumnium? Or go ontop of wood?

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[OP]
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Soffits - Remove old wood soffits before replacing with Alumnium? Or go ontop of wood?

Hey guys, replacing old wooden soffits with aluminum ones - is it normal to just go over the old soffits? Currently there is some sections the wood is rotting, so clearly those sections will be removed - but the installer said to leave the good sections. I would rather remove all the old soffits, but is it necessary if the wood is in decent shape?

TIA
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There's no point to covering the wood with aluminum, unless you just want it look better and don't care about function. It won't help with ventilation and will only encourage more rotting.
Wood should be removed and replaced with perforated aluminum.
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Nov 21, 2013
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engineered wrote: There's no point to covering the wood with aluminum, unless you just want it look better and don't care about function. It won't help with ventilation and will only encourage more rotting.
Wood should be removed and replaced with perforated aluminum.
This. The point of having perforated aluminium soffit - beside low maintenance - is having proper ventilation in the attic, saving roof shingle to wear, preventing condensation in the attic, leading to mold - rot.

If OP removes the wooden soffit and install perforated aluminium soffit, he should take inot consideration that this will change the CFM in the attic, anf should have it looked by a professionnal. Too much ventilation is not better than not enough. Too much ventilation can ''suck'' air from the inside, which you do not want. It can suck humidity from the outside as well....
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We have wood under our current aluminum soffit and when it comes time to be replaced which will be in the next couple years I will make sure the wood is removed.
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DoorCrasher wrote: This. The point of having perforated aluminium soffit - beside low maintenance - is having proper ventilation in the attic, saving roof shingle to wear, preventing condensation in the attic, leading to mold - rot.

If OP removes the wooden soffit and install perforated aluminium soffit, he should take inot consideration that this will change the CFM in the attic, anf should have it looked by a professionnal. Too much ventilation is not better than not enough. Too much ventilation can ''suck'' air from the inside, which you do not want. It can suck humidity from the outside as well....
My understanding is that you can't have too much soffit intake, and that the amount of exhaust vents at the top will determine overall ventilation CFM.
Also, good attic air sealing will prevent any "suck" from inside.
Of course, having more than you need could be a waste of money, but perforated aluminum soffit is probably nearly the same price as solid.

I still have wooden soffits and not enough vents IMO. No attic moisture issues, but it gets too hot up there. Even R60 insulation isn't enough to keep it out.
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.
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Nov 21, 2013
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engineered wrote: My understanding is that you can't have too much soffit intake, and that the amount of exhaust vents at the top will determine overall ventilation CFM.
Also, good attic air sealing will prevent any "suck" from inside.
Of course, having more than you need could be a waste of money, but perforated aluminum soffit is probably nearly the same price as solid.

I still have wooden soffits and not enough vents IMO. No attic moisture issues, but it gets too hot up there. Even R60 insulation isn't enough to keep it out.
old houses (like mine) are poorly sealed an insulated. I don't know what R value I have in the attic. There is no vapor barrier, just the old pink fiberglass sheets with kraft paper sticked to it as a vapor barrier. It have been topped with blowed cellulose by the previous owner. Where the walls meet the ceiling, it is not sealed. Electrical boxes for ceiling fixtures and recessed pots are not sealed, I think. But I got my house tested with the negative pressure test and results showed that I am above the averages for the houses built at the same era...
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DoorCrasher wrote: old houses (like mine) are poorly sealed an insulated. I don't know what R value I have in the attic. There is no vapor barrier, just the old pink fiberglass sheets with kraft paper sticked to it as a vapor barrier. It have been topped with blowed cellulose by the previous owner. Where the walls meet the ceiling, it is not sealed. Electrical boxes for ceiling fixtures and recessed pots are not sealed, I think. But I got my house tested with the negative pressure test and results showed that I am above the averages for the houses built at the same era...
Yea, that's worse than mine. Mine is a 1979 house, but it's since been air sealed with a vapour barrier, then insulated over that to R12.
I air sealed the fixtures and topped up the insulation to R60, which helped a ton in the summer sun. Also had them add baffled to all of the rafters, for when I eventually add more than the measly 8 small vents I have in my wood soffits.
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[OP]
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Thanks for the feedback guys. Yah my roof insulation guy said to remove the wood first - but the soffit guy made it seem like going over the wood is pretty common. But I agree that leaving it might just cause more issues down the road. I did get him to quote the removal of the wood as well and that added an extra $1200 to the quote.

I'm getting all the eaves, downspouts, fascia replaced as well.
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MikeTO2 wrote: Thanks for the feedback guys. Yah my roof insulation guy said to remove the wood first - but the soffit guy made it seem like going over the wood is pretty common. But I agree that leaving it might just cause more issues down the road. I did get him to quote the removal of the wood as well and that added an extra $1200 to the quote.

I'm getting all the eaves, downspouts, fascia replaced as well.
What size of house and what was your quote? We have a 50 x 25 bungalow and we quoted soffit, fascia, eavestrough, small bit of siding on either side of the house at the roof line and leaf guard. We were quoted 7000 about 3 years ago but never had it done.
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thebluegoat wrote: What size of house and what was your quote? We have a 50 x 25 bungalow and we quoted soffit, fascia, eavestrough, small bit of siding on either side of the house at the roof line and leaf guard. We were quoted 7000 about 3 years ago but never had it done.
It's a 2 story on 55 lot and quoted 8600 incl leafguards + 1200 for the wood removal + hst. No siding work.
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MikeTO2 wrote: It's a 2 story on 55 lot and quoted 8600 incl leafguards + 1200 for the wood removal + hst. No siding work.
Thanks for the information. I guess our quote wasn’t as outrageous as I thought.
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Just got another quote and they also said this about removing the wood soffits -
"We do not remove the existing wood soffit (it’s overkill), but cutting 4” holes at the eaves to improve attic ventilation."
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It’s overkill because they don’t want to do it.
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Just received quote #3 and you guessed it - removing the wooden soffit first is overkill. Seems to be an industry standard to just leave the soffit and go overtop with Aluminum.
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MikeTO2 wrote: Just received quote #3 and you guessed it - removing the wooden soffit first is overkill. Seems to be an industry standard to just leave the soffit and go overtop with Aluminum.
When it comes down to us doing it maybe I’ll just rip the wood off myself the day before they come.
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thebluegoat wrote: When it comes down to us doing it maybe I’ll just rip the wood off myself the day before they come.
Yah I was actually thinking about this as well. I wonder how hard it will actually be and what kind of tools I'll need. To the Google !
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Rather than start a new thread figured I’d piggy back on existing thread given its the same topic.

We’re getting new aluminum soffits, fascia and eaves.

Few questions:

1. Does it matter if they cover existing wood fascia with the double profile that’s currently there? (See pics). Is it purely aesthetic or is there more to it? Alternative is just covering with a flat piece of aluminum rather than having it bent for double profile.

2. As is common - the company we’re going with is reluctant to remove the existing wood soffits entirely. Given what I’ve read and elsewhere I am pushing them to just remove them all rather than cut more venting holes. What would be a reasonable upcharge for them to remove them entirely? It wasn’t included on their original quote and I’m happy to pay more to get them out but don’t want to get hosed. There would be some more finicky work around the windows that butt up against the bottom of the soffits at the top (on both the front and rear of the house) - see pic.

Thanks for the help!
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I think the reason they don't want to remove the wood is because it makes it easier for them to attach the aluminum.

I might be okay with making holes of they were big enough. Did they say how they would do it? You'd still have worries about rot though.
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engineered wrote: I think the reasons they don't want to remove the wood is because it makes it easier for them to attach the aluminum.

I might be okay with making holes of they were big enough. Did they say how they would do it? You'd still have worries about rot though.
Yeah, easier fastening of the aluminum was one of the reason they gave for not really wanting to remove the entire wood soffits.

Option B was for them to just cut a big strip out of the middle of the wood soffit. May be the best of both worlds as it still gives them something to fasten the aluminum soffit to but gives way more air flow. But in this scenario there would be some wood left up there to potentially rot....which if it’s a small amount then it shouldn’t really matter, should it? It’s not going to cause problems if it’s covered.
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mikek33 wrote: Yeah, easier fastening of the aluminum was one of the reason they gave for not really wanting to remove the entire wood soffits.

Option B was for them to just cut a big strip out of the middle of the wood soffit. May be the best of both worlds as it still gives them something to fasten the aluminum soffit to but gives way more air flow. But in this scenario there would be some wood left up there to potentially rot....which if it’s a small amount then it shouldn’t really matter, should it? It’s not going to cause problems if it’s covered.
If the aluminum is fully ventilated, then it should allow the wood to dry, not that it really should be getting too wet anyways.
A big hole saw may be the best way to do it, but that would be a lot of work and probably wear through a few of them doing it. Other option would be a large spade drill bit and to go nuts with lots of little holes, or to cut out big holes with a sawsall, but that would be tough on a ladder. Maybe a jigsaw would be better.

Any option would be better than what you have, which is what I have too.
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.

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