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[The Source/Staples] Kobo Clara HD 119$

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  • May 11th, 2019 8:29 am
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bunmin wrote:
Apr 24th, 2019 8:51 am
$110 with email sign-up
Says "We’re sorry, the promo code [xxxxxx] you’ve entered can’t be applied."

Never mind it worked when I checkout as guest but not when I was logged in for some reason.
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TheWalrus wrote:
Apr 24th, 2019 10:46 am
It doesn't compare on my opinion. I had a kobo mini years ago and it was very buggy so I sold it for a kindle. Now I have the kobo Clara and it has improved a lot.

The kindle has an atrocious text layout engine. It's rivers galore, justified text has no meaning on the kindle. On the other hand, the kobo lays the text out perfectly, renders more subtleties in text formatting, and lets you sideload your own fonts. Another big plus for me is that you can use the kobo without registering an account and everything works (dictionaries, etc) whereas on the kindle it won't let you use the translation or Wikipedia if you're not registered. The kobo is also much more comfortable to hold in hand because its corners are more rounded, the power button is a lot smoother to press and doesn't stick out as much. And of course the yellow light for reading at night versus the blue light on my kindle pw.

If that matters to you, the Clara uses an sd card internally for storage. If you open it and can use the dd command on Linux (or can follow a tutorial), you can expand the memory from 8GB to up to 128GB. Of course it's not officially supported, you have to be ready to tinker to open the kobo and prepare the replacement card.

Very happy overall, and I don't miss the kindle.
This is a great write-up, especially about the text formatting. That's something that matters to me and I never thought to look that up. Thank-you.
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TheWalrus wrote:
Apr 25th, 2019 8:42 am
It doesn't send by email. I found that the Calibre conversion is much higher quality than the one Amazon does when sending ebooks by email though. And if you have Calibre open to remove the DRM, you might as well use Calibre to transfer the ebook IMO; it takes an extra 10 seconds. The Kobo does receive your Pocket articles wirelessly though if that's something you use.
Okay, thanks for the information.

Now that I think about it, once I get an ePub into Calibre I then convert it to Amazon's .mobi format and use Amazon's "Send to Kindle" app which gets it on there. I can't say I have noticed any big formatting changes, but I haven't read an ePub side-by-side with the same book on Kindle.

Regarding just using a cable to sync books: yes, that isn't a big deal to do, it just doesn't seem like a very 2019 solution. Cables aren't as convenient as wireless, and I need to find the right cable. Perhaps this is something they should look at incorporating. They probably have most of the requisite "back-end" infrastructure already for delivering books bought on the Kobo store.
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Doesn't in display back-light on the new e-readers defeats the purpose of being easy on eyes? its like LCD back-light. My almost 8 years old Sony PRS-T1 and sony case with built-in external light still goes strong and is very easy on eyes. Its a shame Sony is out of the game and no one makes decent e-readers anymore.
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TheWalrus wrote:
Apr 24th, 2019 10:46 am
It doesn't compare on my opinion. I had a kobo mini years ago and it was very buggy so I sold it for a kindle. Now I have the kobo Clara and it has improved a lot.

The kindle has an atrocious text layout engine. It's rivers galore, justified text has no meaning on the kindle. On the other hand, the kobo lays the text out perfectly, renders more subtleties in text formatting, and lets you sideload your own fonts. Another big plus for me is that you can use the kobo without registering an account and everything works (dictionaries, etc) whereas on the kindle it won't let you use the translation or Wikipedia if you're not registered. The kobo is also much more comfortable to hold in hand because its corners are more rounded, the power button is a lot smoother to press and doesn't stick out as much. And of course the yellow light for reading at night versus the blue light on my kindle pw.

If that matters to you, the Clara uses an sd card internally for storage. If you open it and can use the dd command on Linux (or can follow a tutorial), you can expand the memory from 8GB to up to 128GB. Of course it's not officially supported, you have to be ready to tinker to open the kobo and prepare the replacement card.

Very happy overall, and I don't miss the kindle.
Amazon fixed a lot of the typesetting issues in about 2015:
Fast Company Article

I do find that the formatting of ebooks I get can be highly variable, even on purchased books. A lot of this is publishers not caring or just doing a poor job at converting from the print manuscripts to ebooks. I mostly read "classics" so mainly public domain books. If you too like reading old but free books, I recommend this website for nicely formatted ebooks that are light-years better than a typical Project Gutenberg book. But of course, thank you to Project Gutenberg for tirelessly transcribing the books from old scans.

Standard Ebooks: Standard Ebooks.
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imonkey wrote:
Apr 25th, 2019 9:16 am
Regarding just using a cable to sync books: yes, that isn't a big deal to do, it just doesn't seem like a very 2019 solution. Cables aren't as convenient as wireless, and I need to find the right cable. Perhaps this is something they should look at incorporating. They probably have most of the requisite "back-end" infrastructure already for delivering books bought on the Kobo store.
Whatever works for you. I guess I got older, but to me newer isn't always better :) I find the cable method more consistent and reliable and I don't have to keep the wifi on. I actually had my Kindle forget about any wifi network at all because I didn't like it calling home and transmitting my reading history etc back to Amazon. I just keep a USB cable plugged into my monitor and/or the docking station so there is always a mini USB available for whatever I need. I also don't depend on a feature that can be switched off any time by a third party I have no control over, and it's nobody's business what I send to my e-reader (idk if Amazon runs any kind of analytics on send by email documents, but Amazon loves metrics so you never know)

I also found that transferring to the Kobo with the cable is quicker because the ebook doesn't need to be converted into Amazon's format first so it's just a copy rather than convert + copy.

Anyway, if you prefer wireless email then the Kobo doesn't do it.
Last edited by TheWalrus on Apr 25th, 2019 9:35 am, edited 1 time in total.
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canadatoronto wrote:
Apr 25th, 2019 9:21 am
Doesn't in display back-light on the new e-readers defeats the purpose of being easy on eyes? its like LCD back-light. My almost 8 years old Sony PRS-T1 and sony case with built-in external light still goes strong and is very easy on eyes. Its a shame Sony is out of the game and no one makes decent e-readers anymore.
They're not backlit. They are front-lit, meaning the ereader has LEDs that shine light onto the screen from the side. It really is much easier on the eyes than back-lighting and is much more akin to reading an actual book with a light on to see the pages.
Last edited by imonkey on Apr 25th, 2019 9:38 am, edited 1 time in total.
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imonkey wrote:
Apr 25th, 2019 9:29 am
Amazon fixed a lot of the typesetting issues in about 2015:
Fast Company Article

I do find that the formatting of ebooks I get can be highly variable, even on purchased books. A lot of this is publishers not caring or just doing a poor job at converting from the print manuscripts to ebooks. I mostly read "classics" so mainly public domain books. If you too like reading old but free books, I recommend this website for nicely formatted ebooks that are light-years better than a typical Project Gutenberg book. But of course, thank you to Project Gutenberg for tirelessly transcribing the books from old scans.

Standard Ebooks: Standard Ebooks.
Look at my side by side comparison of exactly the same file between Kindle and Kobo. Clearly, Amazon still has a lot of work to do if they care about decent typesetting. I found the typesetting to be consistently bad on the Kindle whether it's Project Gutenberg books, purchased Amazon books, or libgen.io books. If you don't pay attention to these things you probably won't notice, but once you know what rivers, widows, orphans, and justification are you can't unsee it and the Kindle does a very very poor job at this.
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TheWalrus wrote:
Apr 25th, 2019 9:30 am
I actually had my Kindle forget about any wifi network at all because I didn't like it calling home and transmitting my reading history etc back to Amazon. I just keep a USB cable plugged into my monitor and/or the docking station so there is always a mini USB available for whatever I need.
I totally agree with being careful with what information is being shared with Amazon. I hope all they do is track the book title and sync my progress. I should look further into this. Often I read some of the book on Kindle and some on the Kindle App on iPhone or iPad, and having my position remembered is super nice.
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canadatoronto wrote:
Apr 25th, 2019 9:21 am
Doesn't in display back-light on the new e-readers defeats the purpose of being easy on eyes? its like LCD back-light. My almost 8 years old Sony PRS-T1 and sony case with built-in external light still goes strong and is very easy on eyes. Its a shame Sony is out of the game and no one makes decent e-readers anymore.
It's not like an LCD backlight, it's actually a front light on top of the reflective eInk display by means of edge lighting a fibre-optic layer over the reflective screen. The newer version on the Kobo e-readers allows the colour temp to be adjusted to suit you.

I always hated external lights on e-readers because there's unavoidable screen glare at certain angles. Built-in lighting is way better. I'd never buy an e-reader without built-in lighting now.

Sony made a decent e-reader in terms of functionality - for example they were the only ones to support reflow of pdf docs to fit the screen. But they used the same eInk screens as everyone else, and I've never been a fan of Sony's reliability.
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TheWalrus wrote:
Apr 25th, 2019 9:34 am
Look at my side by side comparison of exactly the same file between Kindle and Kobo. Clearly, Amazon still has a lot of work to do if they care about decent typesetting. I found the typesetting to be consistently bad on the Kindle whether it's Project Gutenberg books, purchased Amazon books, or libgen.io books. If you don't pay attention to these things you probably won't notice, but once you know what rivers, widows, orphans, and justification are you can't unsee it and the Kindle does a very very poor job at this.
"Where ignorance is bliss, 'tis folly to be wise"? I will take your word for it, but I have never really noticed it to be too bad on books where the publisher actually tried to do a good layout. But then again I don't know what rivers, widows, or orphans are! I would probably be horrified if I did and knew what I was missing out on!
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imonkey wrote:
Apr 25th, 2019 3:02 am
I have only owned Kindles, but would be open to switching over. Can you add books to the device by email (or somehow wirelessly) like the Kindle does? I use that all the time. [...]
If you have Calibre on a computer, you could activate a feature of Calibre called the "Calibre Content Server", which "casts" the books from your Calibre library as a web page, which then can be read (over Wi-Fi) on the Kobo device.
You will need to have your computer running (only at the initial selection stage) and you will need to know the IP address of your running computer.
Then, on your Kobo e-reader (connected to the same Wi-Fi network as your running computer) just point the Kobo browser to the IP address of the computer running the Content Server and you will be able to browse your book collection.
For example, if the computer running the Calibre Content Server has IP address 63.45.128.8, you would point the Kobo browser to:
http://63.45.128.8:8080
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canadatoronto wrote:
Apr 25th, 2019 9:21 am
Doesn't in display back-light on the new e-readers defeats the purpose of being easy on eyes? its like LCD back-light. My almost 8 years old Sony PRS-T1 and sony case with built-in external light still goes strong and is very easy on eyes. Its a shame Sony is out of the game and no one makes decent e-readers anymore.
My understanding (EDIT: as others have confirmed) is that the light on ebook readers comes from the side of the display rather than from the back. So the light illuminates the text rather than points into the eyes. I read from a Kobo every night and even when my eyes are sore, it doesn't aggravate the soreness and, in my opinion, eases the soreness.
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rui wrote:
Apr 24th, 2019 9:10 am
How does it compare with kindle paperwhite 2018?
Planning use for comics.
I have the Kindle Paperwhite 3 (2015) and tried a couple of manga volumes. I personally found it far too slow page flipping and especially slow if you ever need to pinch-to-zoom/page scroll (because it's shrunk down to a 6" screen and sometimes the text/bubbles are really small). It's great for regular ebooks, better than my gen.1 Kobo Aura (2013). If you plan on reading lots of comics/manga then I'd suggest getting a regular Android or Apple tablet instead. I bought the Fire HD 10 on sale last year specifically for reading comics & general surfing.
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AvroeArrow wrote:
Apr 25th, 2019 4:10 pm
I have the Kindle Paperwhite 3 (2015) and tried a couple of manga volumes. I personally found it far too slow page flipping and especially slow if you ever need to pinch-to-zoom/page scroll (because it's shrunk down to a 6" screen and sometimes the text/bubbles are really small). It's great for regular ebooks, better than my gen.1 Kobo Aura (2013). If you plan on reading lots of comics/manga then I'd suggest getting a regular Android or Apple tablet instead. I bought the Fire HD 10 on sale last year specifically for reading comics & general surfing.
I do have Fire HD 10 which I bought recently, can you please let me know which app are you using? Thanks in advance.
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