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  • May 8th, 2018 9:28 pm
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[OP]
Member
Oct 10, 2005
329 posts
19 upvotes

Speed Rating

I need to replace 2003 Honda Accord EX-L all season tires and have contacted several tire stores for quote.

Now many independent tire stores tells me that I don't need to worry about the speed or the load rating when purchasing the tire.

However, according to accord manual, the car needs 91V and Costco/Dealer says I should only stick to 91V or higher for the tires.

I understand that some might argue that "H" tires are cheaper and since the car will never go beyond the max. speed rating stated in H tires, it's perfectly okay to use it but some online sites are stating that it's important to stick to speed rating.

I am planning to buy a replacement car in few years so I don't need the best tires but I still want safe tires.

So what did you guys do with your tires?
10 replies
Member
Nov 26, 2014
232 posts
236 upvotes
Toronto, ON
jasira wrote: I need to replace 2003 Honda Accord EX-L all season tires and have contacted several tire stores for quote.

Now many independent tire stores tells me that I don't need to worry about the speed or the load rating when purchasing the tire.

However, according to accord manual, the car needs 91V and Costco/Dealer says I should only stick to 91V or higher for the tires.

I understand that some might argue that "H" tires are cheaper and since the car will never go beyond the max. speed rating stated in H tires, it's perfectly okay to use it but some online sites are stating that it's important to stick to speed rating.

I am planning to buy a replacement car in few years so I don't need the best tires but I still want safe tires.

So what did you guys do with your tires?
V rated = Top Speed 240kph
H rated = Top Speed 210kph

That's the difference. To me personally on an Accord H rated is fine. Unless you plan on going any quicker than 210
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Apr 25, 2013
7398 posts
1325 upvotes
S and T rating is the standard speed rating and all you need for your car.
H and V rating is for higher speeds and will use a softer compound and wear faster and will have a less mileage warranty and cost about $15-$20 more compared to a S and T rating.
I think today it is best to buy tires online from Canadian based online vendors like Quattro Tires, Tire & Co. etc... you save a significant amount on each tire and are sure to have the sizes you require.
Most tire manufacturers have a $40-$100 rebate from mid March to the end of May, so buy before May 31st to qualify.
Deal Addict
Mar 30, 2010
2847 posts
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GTA
EdT586 wrote: S and T rating is the standard speed rating and all you need for your car.
H and V rating is for higher speeds and will use a softer compound and wear faster and will have a less mileage warranty and cost about $15-$20 more compared to a S and T rating.
I think today it is best to buy tires online from Canadian based online vendors like Quattro Tires, Tire & Co. etc... you save a significant amount on each tire and are sure to have the sizes you require.
Most tire manufacturers have a $40-$100 rebate from mid March to the end of May, so buy before May 31st to qualify.
The bigger difference would be the sidewall stiffness and construction to handle the higher speeds.
The suspension is also tuned around the speed rating, so a lower rating might produce a slightly softer ride.
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Apr 25, 2013
7398 posts
1325 upvotes
Viperoni wrote: The bigger difference would be the sidewall stiffness and construction to handle the higher speeds.
The suspension is also tuned around the speed rating, so a lower rating might produce a slightly softer ride.
Yup, "H" and "V" rated tires are categorized as "Grand Touring" aka GT and "S" and "T" rated tires are categorized as "Standard Touring".
"H" and "V" rated tires have stiffer sidewalls as their sizes are usually with lower profile tires and a softer compound for higher speeds which leads to faster tread wear and and more harsh ride compared to "S" and "T" rated tires.
Its now becoming a trend that car manufacturers are slapping on "H" rated OEM tires for the simple reason of passing tests with government agencies\ and the consumer will replace it with another "H rated tries when the time comes.
https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/new ... /index.htm
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Oct 13, 2008
4075 posts
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Oshawa
jasira wrote: I need to replace 2003 Honda Accord EX-L all season tires and have contacted several tire stores for quote.

Now many independent tire stores tells me that I don't need to worry about the speed or the load rating when purchasing the tire.

However, according to accord manual, the car needs 91V and Costco/Dealer says I should only stick to 91V or higher for the tires.

I understand that some might argue that "H" tires are cheaper and since the car will never go beyond the max. speed rating stated in H tires, it's perfectly okay to use it but some online sites are stating that it's important to stick to speed rating.

I am planning to buy a replacement car in few years so I don't need the best tires but I still want safe tires.

So what did you guys do with your tires?
It doesn't matter if you are planning to sell the car. You can't get TOP speed anyway.

Look at Sailun, Pace, Kapsen.

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[OP]
Member
Oct 10, 2005
329 posts
19 upvotes
what do you guys think about this video?

Or this? Section from uk site. Will this apply to Canada as well?
How Do I Stand When It Comes To My Insurance?
This is a bit of a moot point, but it’s generally thought that, if you fit tyres with a speed rating lower than your car’s top speed, it could be give your insurer a reason not to pay out in the event of a claim.

This forum thread on the Honest John website explores the issue in more detail - if you’re in any doubt about the speed rating you need on your car, you can also use a tyre finding service, linked to the DVLA database. You’ll find one on some tyre retailers’ websites. These pinpoint the make, model and engine size of every registered vehicle. You can then use this to discover the right speed rating you will need for any replacement tyres.

From an insurer’s point of view, they argue that fitting tyres with a higher speed rating than a car’s top speed helps ensure that those tyres can deal with higher acceleration loads and the stresses of higher speed cornering, even if the maximum speed isn’t exceeded.
Member
Sep 7, 2007
263 posts
115 upvotes
Woodstock
Don't worry about the speed rating unless you're actually going to drive that fast. However, higher speed rating tires have other desirable qualities, like grip and handling, and they also cost more. But if you're not an aggressive driver don't worry about that either.
Member
Feb 4, 2017
259 posts
174 upvotes
Toronto
If in an accident, insurance adjustment can be a dick and deny due to wrong tires on the car. (not OEM spec)
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Jun 12, 2007
15671 posts
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London
jasira wrote: what do you guys think about this video?

Or this? Section from uk site. Will this apply to Canada as well?
Insurance will pay out unless the accident was somehow related to the tire ratings.

Cars are usually speed limited by the engine computer based on the stock tires the car came with (i.e. the car has enough power to go faster, but the engine computer is programmed by the factory to limit the speed)

The difficulty is when you are sued by someone else and they list every possible defect they can find wrong, even if it's totally unrelated.

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