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  • Jan 12th, 2017 8:23 pm
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[OP]
Jr. Member
Nov 12, 2012
105 posts
113 upvotes
BINBROOK

Splitting Cable/Modem

Hopefully somebody can answer this for me.

Currently I have a Rogers Rocket Modem located in my basement, signal isnt great and would like to move it to my main floor. My basement is finished and there are no cable outlets on my main floor (yes its true), so my options are limited to run cable from the basement. The cable to my tv box currently runs directly from the main hub in the basement. Can I put a splitter on this where it comes out of the floor on the main floor and connect my modem to this?
13 replies
Deal Expert
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Jun 9, 2003
24532 posts
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Markham, ON
sure...but if you get a chance, have a technician check the signal...too many splitters (even ones you can't see in your walls) will kill your internet
Deal Fanatic
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May 1, 2003
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you can buy a cheap signal booster to offset that though.
Penalty Box
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Apr 25, 2013
7398 posts
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bionicbadger wrote: you can buy a cheap signal booster to offset that though.
Those cheap amps with high noise levels will actually do more harm than good.

Cable companies use amps from Electroline which cost even more.
http://www.electroline.com/hp_dropamps.php

The cheapest drop amps the OP should get is a 2 or 3 way amp from Channel Master or PCT !
http://overtheair.saveandreplay.com/Dis ... n_Amps.asp
Deal Fanatic
Feb 4, 2015
5633 posts
2188 upvotes
Canada, Eh!!
Rogers installed powered splitter at our place.

Have them check noise on signals
July 13, 2017 to October 25, 2018: BOC raised rates 5 times and MCAP raised its prime rate next day each time.

2020: BOC dropped rates 3 times and MCAP waited and waited to drop its prime rate to include all 3 drops.
Deal Addict
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Oct 13, 2008
3528 posts
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Oshawa
Is your basement unfinished? If it is .. get yourself a gold connector splitter ... run coax to the room where you want to put the modem ... drill a hole from the spot you want to install the modem into the basement ... thread the coax up the hole and connect to your modem.

Done.
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Deal Fanatic
Sep 23, 2013
5047 posts
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NORTH YORK
hob2008 wrote: Hopefully somebody can answer this for me.

Currently I have a Rogers Rocket Modem located in my basement, signal isnt great and would like to move it to my main floor. My basement is finished and there are no cable outlets on my main floor (yes its true), so my options are limited to run cable from the basement. The cable to my tv box currently runs directly from the main hub in the basement. Can I put a splitter on this where it comes out of the floor on the main floor and connect my modem to this?
Can you check if you have a box like this (covered of course) outside your house.
Image

I am 90% sure that the box for your house is somewhere a couple feet above ground. It most likely branches off to reach the cable modem in your basement. It is worth your trouble in locating and attempting to relocate it so its entry point is your main floor not your main floor.
Daniel

Fido $0 3Gb LTE + overage plan until Feb 2019
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Sep 23, 2013
5047 posts
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NORTH YORK
Image

I am sure the OP can trace where the entry point of the cable ( through main floor wall) is.
Daniel

Fido $0 3Gb LTE + overage plan until Feb 2019
[OP]
Jr. Member
Nov 12, 2012
105 posts
113 upvotes
BINBROOK
danieltoronto wrote: Can you check if you have a box like this (covered of course) outside your house.
Image

I am 90% sure that the box for your house is somewhere a couple feet above ground. It most likely branches off to reach the cable modem in your basement. It is worth your trouble in locating and attempting to relocate it so its entry point is your main floor not your main floor.
Is this something I am allowed to do, or should a rogers technician do it.
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Sep 23, 2013
5047 posts
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NORTH YORK
hob2008 wrote: Is this something I am allowed to do, or should a rogers technician do it.
The point that I wanted to make is that the entry point of the cable goes into your house at the main floor level (not to the basement direct). You mentioned that you were planning to run cable to the main floor. Once you can pinpoint the cable in the main floor, relocating the modem will be straight forward.
If you are not comfortable relocating the modem, get Rogers to do that.
There is a lot of plus having the modem/wireless router/VOIP box on the main floor instead of the basement. Stronger Wifi and cordless phone signals can get to the basement and upper floor .
Daniel

Fido $0 3Gb LTE + overage plan until Feb 2019
[OP]
Jr. Member
Nov 12, 2012
105 posts
113 upvotes
BINBROOK
danieltoronto wrote: The point that I wanted to make is that the entry point of the cable goes into your house at the main floor level (not to the basement direct). You mentioned that you were planning to run cable to the main floor. Once you can pinpoint the cable in the main floor, relocating the modem will be straight forward.
If you are not comfortable relocating the modem, get Rogers to do that.
There is a lot of plus having the modem/wireless router/VOIP box on the main floor instead of the basement. Stronger Wifi and cordless phone signals can get to the basement and upper floor .
Basically the cable running into my TV box on my main floor is drilled right through the floor and connected directly to the TV box. I assume this is coming straight from outside, the main hub in my basement looks like spaghetti and I have no idea whats going where. I was hoping to buy a splitter and run my tv and modem off that line on my main floor. I was just wondering if there would be a significant loss in the signal that would affect the internet/tv quality.
Deal Fanatic
Sep 23, 2013
5047 posts
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NORTH YORK
hob2008 wrote: Basically the cable running into my TV box on my main floor is drilled right through the floor and connected directly to the TV box. I assume this is coming straight from outside, the main hub in my basement looks like spaghetti and I have no idea whats going where.
Apparently the main hub cables branch off to the cable outlets in several rooms on the upper floor. In your case, very likely you cannot do anything to the spaghetti wiring mess.
My layout is a lot more simple. I have cut off cable TV way back. On the main floor are my modem/router/VOIP.
TV are through TVPAD and Android boxes (on wifi upstairs). Also I have got around 5 clear channels (free) on DTV through an indoor antenna.
I have got 4 cordless phones for 3 levels of the house all through the VOIP box also on the main floor.
That is the 'simplicity' part: I have no use of all those cable and telephone outlets throughout the house.
Daniel

Fido $0 3Gb LTE + overage plan until Feb 2019
Deal Expert
Mar 23, 2009
17787 posts
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Toronto
I had a house a bunch of old and cheap RG59 wiring, I updated some of those with new high end Belden RG6 wiring ($$$) and I gained maybe 0.5-1.5 dB worth of signal. Better than nothing, but not a big difference, which isn't surprising since the runs aren't very long.

Rogers came around and determined my signals sucked (-10 dB or even lower in some spots) and installed a high quality amplified splitter to replace my existing passive splitter. My signal levels went up dramatically, but I still had TV problems. My guess is the signal to noise ratios just didn't cut it. I was getting occasional image breakup and image freezing while watching TV. Better than previously, but still there from time to time, and very irritating.

Finally, their solution was to replace the cable run from the telephone pole to my house, and but not just with newer RG6. They installed (hundreds of feet of) RG11 instead. I didn't think the difference would be that dramatic, but my signal levels increased hugely and my signal to noise ratios are very good. I had thought the existing run was RG6, but perhaps it was RG59? Or perhaps it was just a bad RG6 cable (old).

As for spaghetti wiring, the solution to this is to install new cables, which can be easy if you're willing to install them on the exterior of the house. Usually much less complicated than fishing in walls everywhere.
Penalty Box
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Apr 25, 2013
7398 posts
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EugW wrote: I had a house a bunch of old and cheap RG59 wiring, I updated some of those with new high end Belden RG6 wiring ($$$) and I gained maybe 0.5-1.5 dB worth of signal. Better than nothing, but not a big difference, which isn't surprising since the runs aren't very long.

Rogers came around and determined my signals sucked (-10 dB or even lower in some spots) and installed a high quality amplified splitter to replace my existing passive splitter. My signal levels went up dramatically, but I still had TV problems. My guess is the signal to noise ratios just didn't cut it. I was getting occasional image breakup and image freezing while watching TV. Better than previously, but still there from time to time, and very irritating.

Finally, their solution was to replace the cable run from the telephone pole to my house, and but not just with newer RG6. They installed (hundreds of feet of) RG11 instead. I didn't think the difference would be that dramatic, but my signal levels increased hugely and my signal to noise ratios are very good. I had thought the existing run was RG6, but perhaps it was RG59? Or perhaps it was just a bad RG6 cable (old).

As for spaghetti wiring, the solution to this is to install new cables, which can be easy if you're willing to install them on the exterior of the house. Usually much less complicated than fishing in walls everywhere.
When you using a splitter, using RG59 vs RG6 is the difference between a lock on Fox44 or no signal here in Montreal !

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