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Staining deck - Brush vs Roller, Second Coat

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[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Dec 11, 2008
6790 posts
2758 upvotes
Montreal

Staining deck - Brush vs Roller, Second Coat

I see some people using rollers to stain their deck. Seems like a brush would do a better job at applying and reach all the little areas than a roller to me.
What do you guys prefer? Would it be a good idea to apply the first coat using a brush, and then a roller for the second coat?

Also I've been hearing mixed things about the second coat. Some people says it would be actually a bad thing to apply the second coat since I'm using a waterproofing stain.
What's your take? I'm using Thompson's WaterSeal Deck & House Waterproofing Stain, Pre-Mixed Oil Hybrid.
9 replies
Deal Expert
User avatar
May 10, 2005
36180 posts
10315 upvotes
Ottawa
In my opinion, using roller will get the product in all the "little areas" better as there will be more stain on a roller than a brush. You will also use more stain by using a roller.
I cannot see any harm in adding a second coat other than it will change the colour, making it darker.
The Government cannot give to anybody anything that the Government does not first take from somebody else.
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Dec 11, 2008
6790 posts
2758 upvotes
Montreal
Pete_Coach wrote: I cannot see any harm in adding a second coat other than it will change the colour, making it darker.
Here's what I read, it's from a manufacturer's website:
Applying a stain moisturizes wood in a way that allows for the wood to soak in freshly applied layers. So, if you apply a second (unnecessary) coat of deck stain to a wood staining project that is already adequately covered, you risk creating a tacky surface that is prone to early peeling because the second coat is not penetrating the wood surface. It is simply layering on top of the first coat of stain.
From Thomson's website:
Only one coat is recommended. A second coat can be added if more color is desired. Allow the first coat to dry approximately 2 hours. Second coat must be applied within 4 hours of initial application.
So I dunno lol
Deal Addict
Mar 12, 2008
1632 posts
186 upvotes
Toronto
makes sense apply a second coat before the first is fully dry. if you let it fully dry then there's only disadvantages.
Deal Expert
User avatar
May 10, 2005
36180 posts
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Ottawa
OK, makes sense.
The Government cannot give to anybody anything that the Government does not first take from somebody else.
Member
Sep 29, 2015
276 posts
81 upvotes
Winnipeg, MB
you use both a roller and a brush.

Brush to cut in and any detail work. Roller for the main flat surface.
Deal Addict
Nov 30, 2003
2624 posts
941 upvotes
Nunavut
Would only use a stain pad, a roller I don't believe is the right tool for staining deck floor boards

Pad can be much cleaner
Member
May 21, 2002
366 posts
67 upvotes
https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.prem ... 62879.html

I used these last week when I stained the deck (using Thompson's as well)

They work well for spreading the paint, but they kind of fall apart (I used two pads for about 380 sq ft of decking)

One coat seems to be working well; the colour is good and its repelling water
Deal Addict
Jul 18, 2005
3770 posts
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wasabi wrote: https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.prem ... 62879.html

I used these last week when I stained the deck (using Thompson's as well)

They work well for spreading the paint, but they kind of fall apart (I used two pads for about 380 sq ft of decking)

One coat seems to be working well; the colour is good and its repelling water
Same here. Used the stain pad, about bought a stick to screw it into - easier on the back. One coat worked well after cleaning it with Thompson's 3-in-1 cleaner.

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