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Standing water in backyard

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  • Apr 4th, 2019 2:05 pm
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[OP]
Newbie
Jan 24, 2018
80 posts
46 upvotes

Standing water in backyard

Just moved to a house this winter and after the snow cleared up, we see there are standing water at the end of the backyard

I will be preparing part of the backyard for a shed, can I just use the soil from that area and fill the lowered area?
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9 replies
Deal Addict
Apr 6, 2008
1807 posts
1152 upvotes
The water will probably absorb into the ground and evaporate in a few weeks. It's still very wet out there right now. I would build a shed on something stronger than soil - pea gravel, patio stones, etc. Soil may sink or heave and brings up moisture from the ground.
Deal Addict
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May 24, 2008
3225 posts
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Toronto
I don't see a big issue here. Just some minor pooling in the very corner, which is where you want it. It means the grading is fine. The ground is still frozen, so this will resolve itself soon. I would not put any soil there, because then you will mess up the grading and you don't know where that water will go next spring - maybe towards the centre of your lawn.
4 years of pain for Ontario...
[OP]
Newbie
Jan 24, 2018
80 posts
46 upvotes
fusion2k2k wrote: The water will probably absorb into the ground and evaporate in a few weeks. It's still very wet out there right now. I would build a shed on something stronger than soil - pea gravel, patio stones, etc. Soil may sink or heave and brings up moisture from the ground.
yes, i will be making a wood frame and fill the area with gravel

Little Tim wrote: I don't see a big issue here. Just some minor pooling in the very corner, which is where you want it. It means the grading is fine. The ground is still frozen, so this will resolve itself soon. I would not put any soil there, because then you will mess up the grading and you don't know where that water will go next spring - maybe towards the centre of your lawn.
yeah, i guess i will keep monitoring it until it gets warmer
Deal Fanatic
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Nov 19, 2004
8934 posts
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Cambridge, ON
If you want to fill it in with soil, you will likely need a permit to change the grading. Otherwise you are going to have angry neighbors since the grading is likely intentional for just the very purpose you are witnessing.
Deal Addict
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Oct 14, 2010
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Barrie ON
It is hard to tell exactly based on the picture quality, but that area looks as if it is designed to be a neighborhood swale. The water from both your yard, and the house behind you, run into this swale. Although the picture doesn't show it, I expect that this swale continues to the properties on the right and left of you as well, and in fact probably runs the length of the block. If you fill in this low spot, you will prevent the water from leaving your neighbors property, or you may just cause this pooling to move to a different area of your own yard.

Her is an image of a neighborhood swale, without any fences, to give you an idea of how it works.

In my neighborhood, there are sewer grates placed in this swale every 2-3 houses to help eliminate the water.

Image
Deal Addict
Nov 17, 2012
3235 posts
2198 upvotes
Toronto
You can't put a shed where the water is anyhow - too close to the property line. Watch your setbacks. While you don't need a building permit for anything 108 sq ft or less, you do need to follow the bylaws and codes.
[OP]
Newbie
Jan 24, 2018
80 posts
46 upvotes
Rick007 wrote: It is hard to tell exactly based on the picture quality, but that area looks as if it is designed to be a neighborhood swale. The water from both your yard, and the house behind you, run into this swale. Although the picture doesn't show it, I expect that this swale continues to the properties on the right and left of you as well, and in fact probably runs the length of the block. If you fill in this low spot, you will prevent the water from leaving your neighbors property, or you may just cause this pooling to move to a different area of your own yard.

Her is an image of a neighborhood swale, without any fences, to give you an idea of how it works.

In my neighborhood, there are sewer grates placed in this swale every 2-3 houses to help eliminate the water.

Image

my neighbour on the right already have trees planted right at the end of the back yard on a bit higher ground, neighbour on the left is pretty level and there are no sewer grates as far as i can tell, so it probably is not a swale?

torontotim wrote: You can't put a shed where the water is anyhow - too close to the property line. Watch your setbacks. While you don't need a building permit for anything 108 sq ft or less, you do need to follow the bylaws and codes.
i did a search and Oakvill seems to be 0.6m or about 2 ft from property line. i am in Richmond hill and tried a search online, don't seem to mention exactly how far from the property line i can build, i guess it would be about the same?
Deal Addict
Nov 17, 2012
3235 posts
2198 upvotes
Toronto
Quick google search brought up this RFD thread on a similar topic

https://forums.redflagdeals.com/deck-si ... l-2196249/

2-3 feet should be fine - it's only an issue if a neighbor complains and the city comes to inspect. Then they make you move your shed.

So make sure it's not an ugly shed, and it isn't sitting in plain view of your neighbor's deck.
Deal Addict
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Aug 12, 2007
4685 posts
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Waterloo
ggster wrote: Just moved to a house this winter and after the snow cleared up, we see there are standing water at the end of the backyard

I will be preparing part of the backyard for a shed, can I just use the soil from that area and fill the lowered area?
I wouldn't go about filling the lower area. there is a reason its lower. If you fill up where do you think the water will go ?
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