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[Staples] ASUS RT-AC86U AC2900 Dual Band Gigabit WiFi Router $199.99 ($50 off)

Newbie
Aug 29, 2009
85 posts
50 upvotes
manho wrote: I just got one burned out on me this week being just shy of 3 years old.

It's a great router, no doubt. But due to the relatively short longevity i experienced and reported issues with ai-mesh-ing with AX routers, I would not buy again.

edit: I would buy if it was $125, but not at $179 or 199.
I bought this @$125 in the recent Amazon deal. Many reported this router burned out after a few years but I feel that it's because of the CPU is always running relatively hot due to it's passive cooling with limited openings on the back. I find that the CPU is always running at 79 c even when idling in my case (ambient 22 c). Though the SoC can tolerate up to ~120 c (IIRC), the other adjacent components may still get "burnt" by this over time.

I stick a spare 80mm fan to the back (on the right side when the CPU sits) and immediate bring down the idle temp by almost 30 c (from 79c to 48c). See the picture attached. Hope this can help the longevity.

I like the dual core 1.8GHz CPU with ample RAMs this router has which certainly helps when running entwares (firewalls, Ad-blocks, logging, etc), VPN and FTP, it's more responsive and stable than the R7000 this replaces even when under heavy load.

So far, I don't experience any dropping connections on 2.4GHz (or 5GHz). But certainly, the 2.4GHz range hurts when my microwave is running though it's far away from the router and on different floor.
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Deal Addict
Jun 20, 2020
4880 posts
4746 upvotes
Toronto
SagaA wrote: So far, I don't experience any dropping connections on 2.4GHz (or 5GHz). But certainly, the 2.4GHz range hurts when my microwave is running though it's far away from the router and on different floor.
Running the microwave effects 2.4 GHz range.

"The problem is that both microwave ovens and Wi-Fi operate on the same frequency, 2.4 GHz. In theory, a properly shielded microwave shouldn't leak any radiation, but the reality is that they leak quite a bit, resulting in electromagnetic, or radio-frequency (RF), interference. And yes, Wi-Fi is a radio signal, but it's broadcasting on a much higher frequency than most broadcast radios operate on."

https://io9.gizmodo.com/why-does-your-m ... 1666117933

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