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  • Jan 15th, 2021 12:40 pm
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Newbie
Nov 22, 2016
10 posts
17 upvotes

[Staples] ASUS RT-AX86U $279.99

I found this router were sold out everywhere. Seems like Staples still have stock available.
This is a great performance router at great price, if you plan to upgrade your Wireless network, it's strongly recommended.
I have a 3 Stories Single Detach, 3000+ sq ft living space. it covers every corner and backyard. Router is position on 1st floor living room beside the TV. No brick/concrete walls within the house.
128 replies
Sr. Member
Feb 14, 2006
852 posts
993 upvotes
Hammonds Plains
Who's got the coupon code?
Sr. Member
Nov 21, 2007
601 posts
75 upvotes
Check newegg might still be $259
Deal Guru
Jun 15, 2012
14820 posts
9086 upvotes
Southern Ontario
mlxconsignment wrote: I found this router were sold out everywhere. Seems like Staples still have stock available.
This is a great performance router at great price, if you plan to upgrade your Wireless network, it's strongly recommended.
I have a 3 Stories Single Detach, 3000+ sq ft living space. it covers every corner and backyard. Router is position on 1st floor living room beside the TV. No brick/concrete walls within the house.
Solid router. Same situation, each floor is 1100+ sq ft x3. The AX86U is in the middle floor. My 5GHz devices full bars, great speed (the lower Rx rate are devices not currently receiving, only just enough to maintain connection which saves power).

Image
Deal Guru
Jun 15, 2012
14820 posts
9086 upvotes
Southern Ontario
If you get this router, I'd recommend turning off Universal Beamforming on both radios, and Explicit off on 2.4, I noticed a performance boost, ymmv. It's enabled by default.

Asus UI > Wireless > Professional > (disable) Universal Beamforming for both 2.4 and 5... (disable) Explicit Beamforming on 2.4

From RMerlin himself:
Personally, I recommend disabling implicit/Universal Beamforming (for compatibility reasons), and keeping Explicit enabled on the 5 GHz band only.
Deal Fanatic
Jun 20, 2020
7086 posts
7732 upvotes
Toronto
Dealliker314159 wrote: How's the user interface on these devices?
"POWERFUL USER-FRIENDLY INTERFACE"

Asus routers run AsusWRT firmware
https://www.asus.com/us/ASUSWRT/

The enhanced ASUSWRT graphical user interface gives you easy access to the 30-second, 3-step web-based installation process. It’s also where you can configure AiCloud 2.0 and all advanced options. ASUSWRT is web-based, so it doesn’t need a separate app, or restrict what you can change via mobile devices — you get full access to everything, from any device that can run a web browser.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Nov 18, 2008
8206 posts
1937 upvotes
Mont-Royal
isnt merlin made by asus?
"Every marathon you run, your heart scars and you will die faster. If you think running a marathon is fitness, then you know NOTHING ABOUT HEALTH & FITNESS."
- Training 101
Deal Fanatic
Jun 20, 2020
7086 posts
7732 upvotes
Toronto
L4cky wrote: isnt merlin made by asus?
Read the "about" page
https://www.asuswrt-merlin.net/about

Asuswrt is the name of the firmware developed by Asus for use on all their recent routers. It was originally based on Tomato, and got extensively modified by Asus over the years as they added their own features to it.

Asuswrt-Merlin is an alternative, customized version of that firmware. Developed by Eric Sauvageau, its primary goals are to enhance the existing firmware without bringing any radical changes, and to fix some of the known issues and limitations, while maintaining the same level of performance as the original firmware. This means Asuswrt-Merlin retains full support for NAT acceleration (sometimes referred to as "hardware acceleration"), enhanced NTFS performance (through the proprietary drivers used by Asus from either Paragon or Tuxera), and the Asus exclusive features such as AiCloud or the Trend Micro-powered AiProtection. New feature addition is very low on the list of priorities for this project.
Newbie
Jan 31, 2017
59 posts
47 upvotes
Honest question - why do you guys buy routers when an access point should be more than enough for wifi needs? Almost all ISP provide a modem + router combo that is fairly decent.
Deal Guru
Jun 15, 2012
14820 posts
9086 upvotes
Southern Ontario
Dealliker314159 wrote: How's the user interface on these devices?
I go back to Asus because it's the same general UI for almost a decade. Plus CDN Eric S. is notorious for tweaking them with his custom Merlin firmware. He also replies on SNBforum, a robust question/problem solving area with a high user base for discussion.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Nov 18, 2008
8206 posts
1937 upvotes
Mont-Royal
greengoo5 wrote: Honest question - why do you guys buy routers when an access point should be more than enough for wifi needs? Almost all ISP provide a modem + router combo that is fairly decent.
people don't like to wire
"Every marathon you run, your heart scars and you will die faster. If you think running a marathon is fitness, then you know NOTHING ABOUT HEALTH & FITNESS."
- Training 101
Sr. Member
Jul 26, 2013
633 posts
541 upvotes
CALGARY
greengoo5 wrote: Honest question - why do you guys buy routers when an access point should be more than enough for wifi needs? Almost all ISP provide a modem + router combo that is fairly decent.
Access point? What's an access point?
We have a Shaw Hitron modem and it's a piece of shit IMO.
Low transfer speeds, unreliable WiFi bands, can only handle a handful of devices on Wifi without crashing.
That's why I want a proper router.
Newbie
Nov 2, 2011
64 posts
136 upvotes
GTA
greengoo5 wrote: Honest question - why do you guys buy routers when an access point should be more than enough for wifi needs? Almost all ISP provide a modem + router combo that is fairly decent.
The router hardware itself (CPU, RAM, etc) usually isn't very powerful, though that's been changing quite a bit recently. (Torrenting, anyone?) An external router with some beefier specs does help with busy networks.
Newbie
Jan 31, 2017
59 posts
47 upvotes
L4cky wrote: people don't like to wire
A router would be wired too no?
findmesumdealz wrote: Access point? What's an access point?
We have a Shaw Hitron modem and it's a piece of shit IMO.
Low transfer speeds, unreliable WiFi bands, can only handle a handful of devices on Wifi without crashing.
That's why I want a proper router.
An access point does all that at a much cheaper price. For example, this at $230 is an enterprise grade top of the line access point that would have far more reliable coverage/ speeds than more expensive routers.
Larkstarr wrote: The router hardware itself (CPU, RAM, etc) usually isn't very powerful, though that's been changing quite a bit recently. (Torrenting, anyone?) An external router with some beefier specs does help with busy networks.
A good access point can handle a busy network pretty well. What aspect of a router would you need that an access point cannot do?

And just to be very clear, I'm also new to the world of networking and in the process of trying to understand this stuff. Based on what I've read so far, I've not been able to find any real use of a router when compared to an access point. I'd be glad if someone experienced sheds some light on this.
Newbie
Nov 2, 2011
64 posts
136 upvotes
GTA
findmesumdealz wrote: Access point? What's an access point?
We have a Shaw Hitron modem and it's a piece of shit IMO.
Low transfer speeds, unreliable WiFi bands, can only handle a handful of devices on Wifi without crashing.
That's why I want a proper router.
Your wifi issues aren't necessarily a problem with ALL the hardware in your Hitron (But I mean, it's also a Hitron so...) - It could be just an issue with the wifi hardware. Note that the 'modem' 'router' and 'wifi' are all technically separate pieces of hardware.

An Access Point (AP) is just that, a point where there's access to a wireless network. Basically an antenna that's wired directly to the router. In most home consumer scenarios, external APs (Ones not rolled into modems/rotuers like your Hitron) are used to extend the range of the wireless network. Sometimes they completely replace built-in APs.
Newbie
Nov 2, 2011
64 posts
136 upvotes
GTA
greengoo5 wrote: A good access point can handle a busy network pretty well. What aspect of a router would you need that an access point cannot do?

And just to be very clear, I'm also new to the world of networking and in the process of trying to understand this stuff. Based on what I've read so far, I've not been able to find any real use of a router when compared to an access point. I'd be glad if someone experienced sheds some light on this.
an AP is not a router. The router does the actual networking.

To put it a different way, you can not have modem -> AP. You need a router in there if you're connecting more than one device to the internet.

(Also 2 AC-lite units would probably be the better choice than one nanoHD, if you even need two AC-lites!)

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