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Locked: Started new job 2 months ago and really underperforming - need advice

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  • Aug 29th, 2020 2:39 pm
[OP]
Member
Feb 1, 2020
220 posts
79 upvotes

Started new job 2 months ago and really underperforming - need advice

Hi All

I am in my late 20s and started a new job in supply chain 2 months ago and so far I have been really underperforming. The role is considered mid senior level and I dont think I will pass probation.

The training and on boarding has been quite minimal. I dont really have any guidance and I have no idea what I am doing. All my tasks and requirements are really ambigous and I cannot motivate myself because I dont see the value in doing a lot of these things. Starting during COViD remotely made things ten times more difficult also. The culture of the company is really demanding and competitive and is known to have a very bad work life balance. When I ask people for help I never get a clear answer so its been really frustrating. I feel my boss will give me a talk soon because I can sense he is not happy and one other coworkers I can tell feels annoyed by my work. I have been looking really clueless in a lot of meetings lately and I hate it.

I interviewed at a company which i was referred by a friend and might get an offer. The role is less senior and a bit less salary but healthier culture. Not sure what to do if i get an offer because my managers will kill me if i quit so soon.

What should I do? Should I take the new job if i get an offer? My current company has lots of room for growth but the culture is quite toxic. The company I interviewed is healthier culture but no room for growth.
I just dont know if i can turn things around at my current company.
257 replies
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Jan 31, 2006
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VanillaIce1992 wrote: Hi All

I am in my late 20s and started a new job in supply chain 2 months ago and so far I have been really underperforming. The role is considered mid senior level and I dont think I will pass probation.

The training and on boarding has been quite minimal. I dont really have any guidance and I have no idea what I am doing. All my tasks and requirements are really ambigous and I cannot motivate myself because I dont see the value in doing a lot of these things. Starting during COViD remotely made things ten times more difficult also. The culture of the company is really demanding and competitive and is known to have a very bad work life balance. When I ask people for help I never get a clear answer so its been really frustrating. I feel my boss will give me a talk soon because I can sense he is not happy and one other coworkers I can tell feels annoyed by my work. I have been looking really clueless in a lot of meetings lately and I hate it.

I interviewed at a company which i was referred by a friend and might get an offer. The role is less senior and a bit less salary but healthier culture. Not sure what to do if i get an offer because my managers will kill me if i quit so soon.

What should I do? Should I take the new job if i get an offer? My current company has lots of room for growth but the culture is quite toxic. The company I interviewed is healthier culture but no room for growth.
I just dont know if i can turn things around at my current company.
Think about your future NOT the company, if you find a new job just resign since you mention it is a toxic company.
[OP]
Member
Feb 1, 2020
220 posts
79 upvotes
Thats what a lot of reviews on Glassdoor say and I can see that already. I am working for a popular Canadian coffee shop chain which is owned by a brazilian investment firm known to be very aggtessive on cutting costs and zero based budgeting.
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Mar 23, 2008
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VanillaIce1992 wrote: Hi All

I am in my late 20s and started a new job in supply chain 2 months ago and so far I have been really underperforming. The role is considered mid senior level and I dont think I will pass probation.

The training and on boarding has been quite minimal. I dont really have any guidance and I have no idea what I am doing. All my tasks and requirements are really ambigous and I cannot motivate myself because I dont see the value in doing a lot of these things. Starting during COViD remotely made things ten times more difficult also. The culture of the company is really demanding and competitive and is known to have a very bad work life balance. When I ask people for help I never get a clear answer so its been really frustrating. I feel my boss will give me a talk soon because I can sense he is not happy and one other coworkers I can tell feels annoyed by my work. I have been looking really clueless in a lot of meetings lately and I hate it.

I interviewed at a company which i was referred by a friend and might get an offer. The role is less senior and a bit less salary but healthier culture. Not sure what to do if i get an offer because my managers will kill me if i quit so soon.

What should I do? Should I take the new job if i get an offer? My current company has lots of room for growth but the culture is quite toxic. The company I interviewed is healthier culture but no room for growth.
I just dont know if i can turn things around at my current company.
Who cares if your current managers get their knickers in a twist by you quitting soon after being hired. It’s not like you’re going to put them on your resume or reference list anyways.

Do what’s right for you. You could try having a “heart to heart” conversation with your manager about feeling like you’re floundering, but that may just get you fired without you having a fallback position. Probably best to keep floundering for now and look for a new position.

C
[OP]
Member
Feb 1, 2020
220 posts
79 upvotes
CNeufeld wrote: Who cares if your current managers get their knickers in a twist by you quitting soon after being hired. It’s not like you’re going to put them on your resume or reference list anyways.

Do what’s right for you. You could try having a “heart to heart” conversation with your manager about feeling like you’re floundering, but that may just get you fired without you having a fallback position. Probably best to keep floundering for now and look for a new position.

C
Its just that I am really upset at how things went. I was really excited to work here since there was so much room for growth but I feel I am being set up to fail
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Apr 14, 2017
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Leave then. Apply elsewhere and hope for the best. Life goes so fast, don't work a job you absolutely hate.
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Jul 13, 2009
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VanillaIce1992 wrote: Thats what a lot of reviews on Glassdoor say and I can see that already. I am working for a popular Canadian coffee shop chain which is owned by a brazilian investment firm known to be very aggtessive on cutting costs and zero based budgeting.
Sounds about right. Before they took over it WAS perfectly fine.

I would say at least try your best, show effort on your part and keep reaching out to your boss. If he/she gives you the cold shoulder and has no interest in supporting your first 3 months, you have to look out for yourself.

ON THE OTHER HAND, keep in mind these are really challenging times with covid and the job market is not great at all. Proceed with caution but take care of yourself first.
Sr. Member
Nov 10, 2019
600 posts
559 upvotes
Before you make the decision to accept or reject the new position, you need to have a serious talk with your current manager to figure out together whether this is for you. Express how you feel, ask where the direction is for you, be honest and tell him about your challenges, and concerns. If he's supportive and willing to go out of his way to get you back on track, you can consider continuing. Communicating this to your boss shows you do care and gives you an answer on whether to accept the other job.
Deal Guru
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Mar 23, 2008
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VanillaIce1992 wrote: Its just that I am really upset at how things went. I was really excited to work here since there was so much room for growth but I feel I am being set up to fail
If you want to leave, then leave. Just cautioning you about leaving one job without having another one to jump to. You won't qualify for EI if you quit this job, most likely.

C
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Feb 4, 2010
6397 posts
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kimchibowl wrote: Before you make the decision to accept or reject the new position, you need to have a serious talk with your current manager to figure out together whether this is for you. Express how you feel, ask where the direction is for you, be honest and tell him about your challenges, and concerns. If he's supportive and willing to go out of his way to get you back on track, you can consider continuing. Communicating this to your boss shows you do care and gives you an answer on whether to accept the other job.
OP - I agree with this advice.

Don't feel upset - if you tried your best and this is the outcome, you need to speak with your manager. If they're a good manager they will mentor you, if they're not...well you'll know and that's your sign to leave but try to secure another job first if you can, but if it's too stressful - just leave. NO JOB is worth your mental, emotional or physical health - toxic work culture will only create stress.

And like others said, who cares if they get mad. You have to look at for you - no else is. You don't have even have to worry about putting it on your resume...a gap on your resume this year will be understandable to most.

Good luck and don't be too hard on yourself. There are more [email protected]@hole managers than there are good ones - I've had about 15 managers or so, and only one of them was great (one of the few female ones I've had), 2 mediocre the rest sucked and shouldn't be in a management role. Try to look at these things as life lessons.
[OP]
Member
Feb 1, 2020
220 posts
79 upvotes
hierophant wrote: OP - I agree with this advice.

Don't feel upset - if you tried your best and this is the outcome, you need to speak with your manager. If they're a good manager they will mentor you, if they're not...well you'll know and that's your sign to leave but try to secure another job first if you can, but if it's too stressful - just leave. NO JOB is worth your mental, emotional or physical health - toxic work culture will only create stress.

And like others said, who cares if they get mad. You have to look at for you - no else is. You don't have even have to worry about putting it on your resume...a gap on your resume this year will be understandable to most.

Good luck and don't be too hard on yourself. There are more [email protected]@hole managers than there are good ones - I've had about 15 managers or so, and only one of them was great (one of the few female ones I've had), 2 mediocre the rest sucked and shouldn't be in a management role. Try to look at these things as life lessons.
I actually quit my previous job after 3 months on january because it was a really bad fit for me. I dont want to do the same thing again.
Member
Feb 8, 2017
459 posts
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VanillaIce1992 wrote: I actually quit my previous job after 3 months on january because it was a really bad fit for me. I dont want to do the same thing again.
you are right - leaving 2 places because of a bad fit or "toxic" environment will not look good on your resume or if you leave these jobs off your resume leave a large gap between jobs. making a bad move that is not the right fit happens occasionally and to a lot of people. you don't really know what the environment is like until you get in there and see for yourself. it's happened to me in the past. but for this to happen twice in back to back jobs? maybe you need to take a hard introspective look at yourself and be really honest as to why these last 2 places have not worked out.

i've not been at too many places where the on boarding hasn't been here is your computer, here is a place to work, go figure it out. it's quite common. you are working for a well known company and most people have an idea of how it is run. so if you can show some time on your resume there it will open up doors for you in the future. you mention you are in supply chain - did you have previous supply chain experience that you can leverage in your current role? supply chain is a specific role so i would find it hard to believe they would have hired you without some sort of background in the field.

my advice to you is buckle down and get to work. if the other job you are going for does not work out then you really need to pull your socks up and stick it out for a while. leaving jobs after 3 months or less is not doing you any favours at all. it's not like you are staying there for the rest of your life just another year or so. then you can start looking for something else and not have to worry about explaining why you left 2 jobs in less than 6 months.
[OP]
Member
Feb 1, 2020
220 posts
79 upvotes
aubgray1 wrote: you are right - leaving 2 places because of a bad fit or "toxic" environment will not look good on your resume or if you leave these jobs off your resume leave a large gap between jobs. making a bad move that is not the right fit happens occasionally and to a lot of people. you don't really know what the environment is like until you get in there and see for yourself. it's happened to me in the past. but for this to happen twice in back to back jobs? maybe you need to take a hard introspective look at yourself and be really honest as to why these last 2 places have not worked out.

i've not been at too many places where the on boarding hasn't been here is your computer, here is a place to work, go figure it out. it's quite common. you are working for a well known company and most people have an idea of how it is run. so if you can show some time on your resume there it will open up doors for you in the future. you mention you are in supply chain - did you have previous supply chain experience that you can leverage in your current role? supply chain is a specific role so i would find it hard to believe they would have hired you without some sort of background in the field.

my advice to you is buckle down and get to work. if the other job you are going for does not work out then you really need to pull your socks up and stick it out for a while. leaving jobs after 3 months or less is not doing you any favours at all. it's not like you are staying there for the rest of your life just another year or so. then you can start looking for something else and not have to worry about explaining why you left 2 jobs in less than 6 months.
I understand and I definetely learned a valuable lesson from all this. The problem is the way things are going i think i will be fired from this position for low performance soon. I do have previous supply chain experience but every company hss their own network and systems.
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Jan 1, 2017
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VanillaIce1992 wrote: I understand and I definetely learned a valuable lesson from all this. The problem is the way things are going i think i will be fired from this position for low performance soon. I do have previous supply chain experience but every company hss their own network and systems.
Talk to your boss and ask him/her for feedback on how you can do things better and improve your performance. Show initiative that you are willing to recognize weaknesses and improve on them. That goes along way.
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Jul 21, 2009
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VanillaIce1992 wrote: Hi All

I am in my late 20s and started a new job in supply chain 2 months ago and so far I have been really underperforming. The role is considered mid senior level and I dont think I will pass probation.

The training and on boarding has been quite minimal. I dont really have any guidance and I have no idea what I am doing. All my tasks and requirements are really ambigous and I cannot motivate myself because I dont see the value in doing a lot of these things. Starting during COViD remotely made things ten times more difficult also. The culture of the company is really demanding and competitive and is known to have a very bad work life balance. When I ask people for help I never get a clear answer so its been really frustrating. I feel my boss will give me a talk soon because I can sense he is not happy and one other coworkers I can tell feels annoyed by my work. I have been looking really clueless in a lot of meetings lately and I hate it.

I interviewed at a company which i was referred by a friend and might get an offer. The role is less senior and a bit less salary but healthier culture. Not sure what to do if i get an offer because my managers will kill me if i quit so soon.

What should I do? Should I take the new job if i get an offer? My current company has lots of room for growth but the culture is quite toxic. The company I interviewed is healthier culture but no room for growth.
I just dont know if i can turn things around at my current company.
The best thing you can do is perform well, surely you have some skills and value you can bring unless you completely lied on your interview. Also force yourself to fit in (maybe you will end up liking it) and in 3-6 months time if you choose not to work there, line up another job and quit.

Waiting to get fired or just quitting cause you find it "toxic" with no backup plan isn't going to look good for future employment especially since this is your 2nd job in 3 months.
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Mar 23, 2008
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VanillaIce1992 wrote: I actually quit my previous job after 3 months on january because it was a really bad fit for me. I dont want to do the same thing again.
If most places you work at are "toxic" or a "bad fit", you may want to consider the common element... I'm not saying that's the case, but it's something you may want to take a look at.

C
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Oct 3, 2013
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CNeufeld wrote: If most places you work at are "toxic" or a "bad fit", you may want to consider the common element... I'm not saying that's the case, but it's something you may want to take a look at.

C
I'd say this is part of what the OP may wish to consider.

This sounds more like a case of the OP not possessing the experience, training, and/or knowledge to be suited for a "mid senior-level" position. Pay is always enticing, but perhaps the OP is better suited to undertake a more entry-level position first, to gain a better idea of what his/her roles are in a supply-chain company, and to understand the value of their duties. I'd rather have job security and gain attractive skills, rather than jump jobs every 2-3 months chasing a paycheque. Money is not everything, and most of us (even RFDers) learn that pretty quick.

It sucks - jobs often have minimal "on-boarding", and you are typically just shown the location of the break room, bathroom, and your desk. I get that companies can't hold drool cups for new employees, but how is anyone supposed to succeed if they are thrown into a brand new role they've never had exposure to? I've had jobs where they didn't even tell me what my duties were, then got mad at me for not fulfilling them, or filling out the paperwork I didn't know existed.

On the flip side, having been around the block a few places, there are some real shite and horribly run companies out there. One thing most of us also learn is to lower expectations in the workplace and just accept there will always be problems in the workplace that go unaddressed. What matters more are the magnitude of said problems, and how it affects you on a day-to-day basis. The little ones, provided they are small in number, most of us can live with. If the workplace is truly "toxic" though, it's simply not worth sticking around for long-term. If the company you work for is truly toxic, cut your losses and leave at the earliest opportunity. Your mental health is worth more than a few dollars.

To answer the OP's question, there's nothing much you can do. Have an honest discussion with your boss, agree that it's not a good fit and that you weren't quite as well suited for the position as you previously thought, and move on. It happens. You won't even remember this even happened 10 years from now. That said, make sure you're comfortable with the roles/responsibilities of your next job, rather than just jumping straight into it for the sake of you not being happy at your current job. Otherwise, this will be a revolving door situation...
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Jun 27, 2006
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Phonophoresis wrote: I'd say this is part of what the OP may wish to consider.

This sounds more like a case of the OP not possessing the experience, training, and/or knowledge to be suited for a "mid senior-level" position. Pay is always enticing, but perhaps the OP is better suited to undertake a more entry-level position first, to gain a better idea of what his/her roles are in a supply-chain company, and to understand the value of their duties. I'd rather have job security and gain attractive skills, rather than jump jobs every 2-3 months chasing a paycheque. Money is not everything, and most of us (even RFDers) learn that pretty quick.

It sucks - jobs often have minimal "on-boarding", and you are typically just shown the location of the break room, bathroom, and your desk. I get that companies can't hold drool cups for new employees, but how is anyone supposed to succeed if they are thrown into a brand new role they've never had exposure to? I've had jobs where they didn't even tell me what my duties were, then got mad at me for not fulfilling them, or filling out the paperwork I didn't know existed.

On the flip side, having been around the block a few places, there are some real shite and horribly run companies out there. One thing most of us also learn is to lower expectations in the workplace and just accept there will always be problems in the workplace that go unaddressed. What matters more are the magnitude of said problems, and how it affects you on a day-to-day basis. The little ones, provided they are small in number, most of us can live with. If the workplace is truly "toxic" though, it's simply not worth sticking around for long-term. If the company you work for is truly toxic, cut your losses and leave at the earliest opportunity. Your mental health is worth more than a few dollars.

To answer the OP's question, there's nothing much you can do. Have an honest discussion with your boss, agree that it's not a good fit and that you weren't quite as well suited for the position as you previously thought, and move on. It happens. You won't even remember this even happened 10 years from now. That said, make sure you're comfortable with the roles/responsibilities of your next job, rather than just jumping straight into it for the sake of you not being happy at your current job. Otherwise, this will be a revolving door situation...
This. It sounds like a crappy situation to be in but at the same time, while this may come off as overly simplified, the concepts of supply chain don't change that much from sector to sector. Sure, the systems, processes and terms will probably be different but that is where anyone new to any organization especially if they were brought in at a non-entry level position will need to adapt to.

OP, while there hasn't been any real onboarding from the sounds of it, it would be fair for you to ask for some job shadowing of some sort to help you get up to speed. There are probably manuals or some other documentation that is available for you to look into, which should help with you ability to do the job. No job is going to be "easy" as there is always a learning curve for everyone. Other people in the company are probably quite stressed as well given the current environment and may not be as easy to get along with at the moment but you have to look past that and try to engage them in other ways. The sooner you are more up to speed, the sooner you will be seen as someone who is working with them.

Good luck.
[OP]
Member
Feb 1, 2020
220 posts
79 upvotes
i think i will ask my boss tomorrow how he thinks i am doing and i will tell him i feel ive been underperforming and that i have another offer on hand. I will ask him if he thinks ill pass probation
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Jan 1, 2017
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VanillaIce1992 wrote: i think i will ask my boss tomorrow how he thinks i am doing and i will tell him i feel ive been underperforming and that i have another offer on hand. I will ask him if he thinks ill pass probation
Wow! That’s like the worst thing you can do. I thought you don’t even have another offer yet but you are starting to interview process. Don’t tell your boss about another offer until you are quitting.

Also you should ask him on what he thinks you can do better and how to do things better as you believe you can be doing better than now. Also mention that you are always looking for ways to improve yourself.

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