Food & Drink

Stop wasting food!

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  • Oct 29th, 2013 12:59 am
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[OP]
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Jun 2, 2009
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Stop wasting food!

Found this article and thought it was interesting as I am guilty of this as well.

http://www.cnn.com/2013/09/19/health/se ... aste-food/


Most consumers mistakenly believe that expiration dates on food indicate how safe the food is to consume, when these dates actually aren't related to the risk of food poisoning or foodborne illness.

Food dating emerged in the 1970s, prompted by consumer demand as Americans produced less of their own food but still demanded information about how it was made. The dates solely indicate freshness, and are used by manufacturers to convey when the product is at its peak. That means the food does not expire in the sense of becoming inedible.

For un-refrigerated foods, there may be no difference in taste or quality, and expired foods won't necessarily make people sick.

But according to the new analysis, words like "use by" and "sell by" are used so inconsistently that they contribute to widespread misinterpretation — and waste — by consumers. More than 90% of Americans throw out food prematurely, and 40% of the U.S. food supply is tossed--unused--every year because of food dating.
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Dec 7, 2012
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Related article,

Use-by dates under attack! Can they be defended or improved?

By Ethel Tiersky
Oct 21, 2013
Never thought I'd see the day when shelf life matters became big news in the popular media. Nor did I expect use-by dates to become a source of humor. But, thanks to a well-publicized new report--jointly issued by the Natural Resources Defense Council, (the NRDC) and Harvard Law School Food Law and Policy Clinic--use by and sell by dates are finally getting the attention they deserve.

Way back in 2010, Shelf Life Advice published an article entitled "It Says Use By Tomorrow, But You Don't Have To." Since that year, about 2 million people have visited Shelf Life Advice. But, sadly, we haven't made a dent in the national confusion about so-called expiration dates on food. Now, perhaps, the country is about to enter a new era. This new report--The Dating Game: How Confusing Food Date Labels Lead to Food Waste in America--not only tells what's wrong with the food dating system but also recommends solutions to the problem.

Continued here http://shelflifeadvice.com/content/use- ... r-improved
Deal Guru
Dec 31, 2005
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Not an issue for us... buy fresh product more frequently and this becomes moot.
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Aug 22, 2006
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bonterra wrote:
Oct 25th, 2013 11:10 pm
Would you shop here? I would.

http://news.nationalpost.com/2013/09/30 ... ne-to-eat/
LOL
I love how they publicly advertise this where any restaurant that cooks instead of ordering form Sysco and any grocery store that has a hot food/deli department already does this.
You're a fool if you think you don't eat "expired" food on a regular basis.
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nalababe wrote:
Oct 26th, 2013 8:29 am
Not an issue for us... buy fresh product more frequently and this becomes moot.
exactly... buy less more often

problem solved
ShadowVlican
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Dec 3, 2009
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I guess its me doing most of the facepalming here with consumers not understanding best befores.

In a way you can't blame them with food safety scares the media throws at us and nobody wants to pay full retail for something past due (except Limburger cheese of course).

I still smirk when I'm shopping when someone is trying make sense of a julian code on a food can thinking its an expiry date.
Remember to be an RFD-er and NOT a degenerate.
Jr. Member
Feb 27, 2012
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OTTAWA
My two cents: Whenever something in the fridge is approaching its expiry date, it may be possible to salvage it by simply freezing it thereby extending its expiry date. It's amazing how much stuff freeze well. I very often freeze yoghurt and cheeses like mozzarella & feta, ham. Vegetables can be frozen as well to be used in stock or soup at a later date. Herbs like parsley (but not cilantro though), basil, mint, all freeze well. Sure, many will be better used in cooked dishes instead of eaten as when they were fresh, but at least they will not have been wasted.
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May 2, 2009
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Meesty wrote:
Oct 27th, 2013 11:46 pm
Herbs like parsley (but not cilantro though), basil, mint, all freeze well. Sure, many will be better used in cooked dishes instead of eaten as when they were fresh, but at least they will not have been wasted.
What is it with cilantro? I have a big bag of frozen herbs, basil, tarragon, sage, savoury, oregano, parsley, dill, bay leaves....but cilantro... freeze it and it just loses all characteristic taste.
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Oct 7, 2007
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I think this whole thing with expiration dates is a way for these big corporations to continue to drive consumer consumption. If they mislead people to think that the food is bad by the expiration date, people will simply throw it out and by more. On another note, I have wondered what happens if you donate nonperishable food that is past the expiration/best before date to a food bank. Will they throw it out? Sometimes I buy something and if I haven't used it for a while it may mean that it was an impulse buy and I may never use it. However, if I donate an item past the date to the food bank and their rule is to throw it out, I'd rather keep it in my pantry as it may still get used that way.
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Aug 14, 2007
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A lot of the time it isn't even an expiry date it says "best before". I have eaten refrigerated eggs 2 months past the best before date, milk a month after, cheese months after (cut off any mold). Of course if it smells rancid or there is too much mold to salvage it will get tossed. Really the man things that seem to go bad quickly are meat just left in fridge, fruits and veggies.
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Feb 9, 2012
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I'm scared to buy that new "Vegetable" bread with spinach because it's already green!
If "Best before" means it's still safe to eat, how are you supposed to notice the mold? :lol:
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playnicee1 wrote:
Oct 28th, 2013 12:33 pm
I'm scared to buy that new "Vegetable" bread with spinach because it's already green!
If "Best before" means it's still safe to eat, how are you supposed to notice the mold? :lol:
Lol!! I would eat that within a few days of buying just to be safe...I agree with also putting stuff in the freezer but sometimes those things get forgotten. I always do the smell test...I'm leery of chicken and milk after the best before date though...that's just the runs waitin to happen
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Vladimir wrote:
Oct 28th, 2013 11:05 am
cheese months after (cut off any mold).
This can be dangerous though. Toxins can end up on non moldy parts.
playnicee1 wrote:
Oct 28th, 2013 12:33 pm
I'm scared to buy that new "Vegetable" bread with spinach because it's already green!
If "Best before" means it's still safe to eat, how are you supposed to notice the mold? :lol:
If it's anything like Dempster's sandwich white, it won't go moldy. I have a loaf sitting on my shelf now for about 6 months and it hasn't gone fuzzy. I can't bear to throw it away because I want to see where it goes. It's still soft which means it has moisture. Either that or a hilarious concoction of chemicals making it soft without water.

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