Food & Drink

Store-bought turkey stuffing?

  • Last Updated:
  • Sep 16th, 2021 2:47 pm
Tags:
[OP]
Newbie
Sep 8, 2020
7 posts
4 upvotes

Store-bought turkey stuffing?

Does anyone have any positive experiences with store-bought turkey stuffing? And if so, can you recommend a brand? I've seen an American site recommend Pepperidge Farm's, but don't know if it's available in my area.

I'm not a big fan of stuffing, but it's falling to me to do turkey for the first time and I'm trying to please everyone without making my task more time-consuming than it needs to be.

Thanks for any information.
20 replies
Deal Fanatic
Aug 29, 2011
7647 posts
4563 upvotes
Mississauga
Butterball makes a frozen stuffing that I’ve had before and I found it to be quite good. It’s nothing fancy just your basic bread-based stuffing with the usual seasonings. Heat it in the oven and serve!
Sr. Member
Aug 18, 2008
574 posts
690 upvotes
In the past year or two they must have discontinued Uncle Ben’s ‘Stuff n’ Such’. It came in different varieties and was really good. Seems like there’s only Stove Top brand now if you’re looking for a boxed stuffing mix.
Deal Addict
Jun 12, 2008
1359 posts
843 upvotes
Ripley
Check out some small delis or butchers. Lots of places sell all of the parts of a turkey dinner. I buy my gravy because I can never get it to turn out right. The place also sells stuffing. This year a lot of small restaurants are doing the same thing.

I make my stuffing in a crockpot. I make the turkey the day before. When I used to help cater a meal for 600 we would peel and cut the potatoes the day before and leave them in buckets of water.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Aug 16, 2010
6925 posts
4197 upvotes
Between Countries
Nothing inherently wrong with store bought instant stuffing. It's cheap and not really different if made from scratch. You're being sold a box of croutons and a bag of spices, perhaps with some dehyrdated veggies and it's up to you to soak it in water and butter. Just get the cheapest stuff (< $1 on sale) and tweak the spices to your own taste.
Deal Fanatic
Aug 29, 2011
7647 posts
4563 upvotes
Mississauga
After having the Butterball frozen stuffing I’ll never go back to Stove Top.
Deal Expert
User avatar
May 10, 2005
36265 posts
10486 upvotes
Ottawa
mrweather wrote: Butterball makes a frozen stuffing that I’ve had before and I found it to be quite good. It’s nothing fancy just your basic bread-based stuffing with the usual seasonings. Heat it in the oven and serve!
I agree. We have had it twice now and are gong to have it again for Christmas dinner.
We follow instructions and microwave it but then we put it in the oven for a while to dry it out a bit. It is a bit bland so salt and pepper are added but I think it is under-seasoned as opposed to over seasoning and making things too salty.
Deal Fanatic
Aug 29, 2011
7647 posts
4563 upvotes
Mississauga
The first time we bought it we did the microwave method and agree it seemed a little wet. Next time we used the regular oven and it turned out really well.
Member
User avatar
Dec 8, 2015
401 posts
219 upvotes
Scarborough, ON
PSlacker wrote: Does anyone have any positive experiences with store-bought turkey stuffing? And if so, can you recommend a brand? I've seen an American site recommend Pepperidge Farm's, but don't know if it's available in my area.

I'm not a big fan of stuffing, but it's falling to me to do turkey for the first time and I'm trying to please everyone without making my task more time-consuming than it needs to be.

Thanks for any information.

2 boxes of Uncle Ben's/Stove top stuffing
add salt & pepper
handful of dried cranberries and fresh sliceded mushrooms, 8 slices of whole wheat bread, cubed up, chopped spinach, pinch of chili flakes, ground thyme, pinch of sage and a cup of low sodium chicken broth for moisture, stuff bird. My tried an true recipe. Merry xmas.
Deal Addict
Nov 12, 2006
2440 posts
1521 upvotes
London
Sorry OP, as I can't answer your direct question, having never used pre-made.
Perhaps this will help others, or change your mind.

I used to always insist on stuffing inside the bird, but there is never enough.
Then I made a crockpot stuffing and it was surprisingly good.
I typically make this, plus inside now.
Sometimes, I only make the crockpot and skip the bird.

My recipe is in a book, so I can't reference it.
I'm sure you can search for similar, and precision isn't required.

It consists of the usual stuffing ingredients, plus:
- some stock
- beaten eggs
- chopped mushrooms
[OP]
Newbie
Sep 8, 2020
7 posts
4 upvotes
My thanks to all of you for your answers and suggestions. I think I'll have my hands too full to experiment with homemade stuffing this time around, but I'm relieved to hear positive words about the Butterball option.

BTW between my mother and her mother, stretching back at least 70 years, they always cooked the bird several days in advance; everything would get carved up and apportioned into tightly-wrapped foil packets (witth lables like "dark meat, serves 4") which would be frozen till the night before Christmas (along with containers of gravy), then reheated slowly as required and piled onto a serving platter. While some might scoff at this (including me, frankly, if I were hearing about it for the first time), I must say that any loss in quality over cooked-same-day is completely imperceptible. The only things that must actually be cooked on Christmas are peas and potatoes, making for a lot less work on an already busy day.

Of course you miss the presentation aspect of carving the bird in front of everyone, but in our opinion the sheer savings in effort on Christmas is definitely worth it.
Sr. Member
Aug 8, 2007
602 posts
444 upvotes
My Costco in Toronto has large bags of Nonni’s stuffing for a reasonable price and I have always liked it more than the others. Also like Nonni’s croutons which are on sale now for $3.99 instead of $5.99 for a large bag.
Deal Addict
Apr 7, 2011
1988 posts
488 upvotes
Hamilton
I don't like the stuffing from Denningers, all you can taste is red pepper.
[OP]
Newbie
Sep 8, 2020
7 posts
4 upvotes
I just wanted to follow up now that the big day has passed. I used the Butterball stuffing and all those who enjoy stuffing liked it; even my mom thought it was pretty close to what she used to make. In fact, I even cooked it wrong and it still worked out fine (supposed to cook it ~90 minutes from frozen; I thawed it, then cooked ~ 40 minutes).

So thanks for everyone's input. I hope you had a good Christmas.
Deal Fanatic
May 2, 2009
7440 posts
2489 upvotes
Good to hear your first turkey dinner went well.

I agree with other posters, stuffing in a crockpot comes out very well. Just don't use too much liquid because it doesn't evaporate.

Mine involves apples, raisins and now I've started adding sausage.
Deal Addict
Mar 27, 2015
1550 posts
667 upvotes
Thornhill, ON
I use Stove Top and add finely diced and sauteed onion, celery, apple and a few candied pecan pieces. Its great. But once we can get to Buffalo again, Wegman's own brand stuffing is way better than Stove Top.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Jan 27, 2004
48392 posts
11680 upvotes
T.O. Lotto Captain
PSlacker wrote: My thanks to all of you for your answers and suggestions. I think I'll have my hands too full to experiment with homemade stuffing this time around, but I'm relieved to hear positive words about the Butterball option.

BTW between my mother and her mother, stretching back at least 70 years, they always cooked the bird several days in advance; everything would get carved up and apportioned into tightly-wrapped foil packets (witth lables like "dark meat, serves 4") which would be frozen till the night before Christmas (along with containers of gravy), then reheated slowly as required and piled onto a serving platter. While some might scoff at this (including me, frankly, if I were hearing about it for the first time), I must say that any loss in quality over cooked-same-day is completely imperceptible. The only things that must actually be cooked on Christmas are peas and potatoes, making for a lot less work on an already busy day.

Of course you miss the presentation aspect of carving the bird in front of everyone, but in our opinion the sheer savings in effort on Christmas is definitely worth it.
Frozen / re-heated meat is perfectly fine! As long as it is packaged properly and not frozen too long. Also it was not over cooked before hand.

Its just one of those things where everyone is waiting for turkey. Then you bring out a big glowing bird fresh out the oven. Then theres the ooo’s and aaah’s. @ least thats how it is with my family
Sr. Member
Jan 4, 2008
797 posts
367 upvotes
Mississauga
hp.. wrote: In the past year or two they must have discontinued Uncle Ben’s ‘Stuff n’ Such’. It came in different varieties and was really good. Seems like there’s only Stove Top brand now if you’re looking for a boxed stuffing mix.
With Thanksgiving coming up, anyone have any luck finding any other kinds of stuffing?

The Uncle Ben's stuffing I found was a nice alternative that didn't have chicken or beef broth in it. Haven't been able to find anything at all since.
Deal Expert
Feb 7, 2017
20856 posts
19113 upvotes
Eastern Ontario
Store bought stuffing is a best seller cuz it’s QUICK & CONVENIENT

The trick though to make it taste even better is to add stuff you like to it …

In a separate pan sauté up whatever your favourite stuffing additions are …

Sausage, Onions, Celery, Peppers, Mushrooms, Chestnuts, Cranberries etc

Max the boxed stuffing with broth vs water
And lastly, toss in your add ons

When we use boxed stuffing our go to is … Stovetop or Uncle Bens (now just called Bens)

Less than 15 minutes you can have decent stuffing. Great with Turkey … but a decent side dish anytime. Comes in various “flavours” (more available in the USA than in Canada … Turkey, Chicken, Pork, Cornbread, Savory Herbs, and Sage are the ones we have found. But Wikipedia says there are also : Beef - Tomato & Onion - San Francisco Sourdough - Mushroom & Onion - Long Grain & Wild Rice and Roasted Garlic - Apple & Cranberry.

A box runs a $ 1 or so on sale … and it’s best to make more than you think you’ll need cuz it tends to be popular with rarely leftovers

Whereas traditional home made stuffing you pretty much got to start a week or so ahead by collecting / cubing day old bread. And you need loads of it. So it can be both time, labour, and more expensive to make
Deal Guru
Nov 15, 2008
11517 posts
6362 upvotes
I use the Stove Top chicken as a base because the turkey one tastes too strongly of sage. I sauté lots of celery (3-4 stalks) & onions (1 large) in chicken fat until they are soft then add 2 boxes of the breadcrumbs & a bit of water. It is best with lots of vegetables in it. At that point you can add diced apple & chopped walnuts or pecans, maybe raisins/cranberries for a duck, which is better with a sweet stuffing. Or start with sausage & use the sausage fat to sauté the vegetables & in place of the butter/margarine called for.

Top

Thread Information

There is currently 1 user viewing this thread. (0 members and 1 guest)