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Strange fascination of places once bustling and now not.

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  • Feb 1st, 2020 5:58 pm
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Deal Guru
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Sep 1, 2005
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Strange fascination of places once bustling and now not.

Periodically I see these types of videos in my "interested in" videos....when I watch one, I can't seem to stop and have to watch another and another.

There are a number of ppl who post videos on Youtube.

These places were once bustling, they're places where ppl made their lives, where ppl raised familes etc. A lot of these places are now very deserted.

Check these out.

Dan Bell - DEAD MALL SERIES >> 2.9 MIL views

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=P ... wchPJGJ3IQ

The Daily WOO



When you watch the Daily WOO you realize how gutted a lot of parts of the US are. Cities like Detroit are just vast areas of empty.

CharlieBo313 - seems to visit "hoods"



There are other videos/content makers who do videos like this. It's just so weird watching them and reading comments when ppl give you insights into the place video'd.
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Capitalism inevitably concentrates all wealth and opportunity. It's why cities have been the primary place humans have lived for all of history. The only reason small town and rural North America was able to exist in the first place with modern living standards is because of the extremely high taxes and generous governments of the mid 20th century redistributing the wealth from cities. Everyone living in those small places hates those governments and the policies that feed their very existence with a passion though, and they've won for so long they've ****ed themselves back to the days when rural farms didn't have electricity or other modern standards like reliable internet.
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That CharlieBo13 guy from Youtube, how has he managed not to get killed visiting all those dangerous ghettoes in the middle of the night? How? He must look like a dirtbag to blend in.
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Piro21 wrote: Capitalism inevitably concentrates all wealth and opportunity. It's why cities have been the primary place humans have lived for all of history.
Do you have a source for the assertion that cities have been the primary place where humans have lived for all of history?

That is not the case for Canada. In 1852 almost 90% of Canadians were rural dwellers.
The proportion of Canadians living in a rural area has steadily declined over the past 160 years, falling below the 50% threshold between 1921 and 1931, mainly as a result of economic changes. Following a pause in the 1930s, probably as a result of the Great Depression, the proportion of Canadians living in a rural area continued to decrease from the 1940s to the early 1970s.
https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/pub/11- ... 04-eng.htm
More than half of the world’s population now live in urban areas — increasingly in highly-dense cities. However, urban settings are a relatively new phenomenon in human history.
For most of human history, most people across the world lived in small communities. Over the past few centuries – and particularly in recent decades – this has shifted dramatically. There has been a mass migration of populations from rural to urban areas.
Here we see that in 1960 twice as many people lived in rural settings (2 billion) than in urban areas (1 billion). In 2007, urban and rural populations were almost exactly equal at 3.33 billion each. In 2016, urban populations increased to 4 billion; while the world’s rural population had increased only marginally to 3.4 billion.
https://ourworldindata.org/urbanization
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MexiCanuck wrote: Do you have a source for the assertion that cities have been the primary place where humans have lived for all of history?

That is not the case for Canada. In 1852 almost 90% of Canadians were rural dwellers.
Trading centers have historically held more people than small farms in every society, and trading centres range from small towns to large cities.

Canada in 1852 wasn't a thing. We were British then, and Canada was a mostly rural farming territory for the people in the British Isles the same way PEI is for Toronto today. Globalization will likely empty out even more rural areas as capitalism naturally concentrates the world's resources and opportunities to a few global hotspots in the future.
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Check this out, right in our backyards:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kitsault
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Piro21 wrote: Trading centers have historically held more people than small farms in every society, and trading centres range from small towns to large cities.


Saying that trading centres have held more population than small farms in every society is quite different from saying that "cities have been the primary place where humans have lived for all of history". As you say, a trading centre could be a small town.

But again, do you have any reference for this assertion?
Piro21 wrote: Canada in 1852 wasn't a thing. We were British then, and Canada was a mostly rural farming territory for the people in the British Isles the same way PEI is for Toronto today. Globalization will likely empty out even more rural areas as capitalism naturally concentrates the world's resources and opportunities to a few global hotspots in the future.
OK, then take Canada in 1871. The population was over 80% rural.

Image

https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/pub/11- ... 04-eng.htm

In the US, an urban dominated population did not occur until 1920.
Beginning in 1910, the minimum population threshold to be categorized as an urban place was set at 2,500. "Urban" was defined as including all territory, persons, and housing units within an incorporated area that met the population threshold. The 1920 census marked the first time in which over 50 percent of the U.S. population was defined as urban.
https://www.census.gov/history/www/prog ... areas.html

Further back in time and migration, Europe in the Middle Ages was dominantly rural.
In the Middle Ages, the majority of the population lived in the countryside, and some 85 percent of the population could be described as peasants.
https://www.bl.uk/the-middle-ages/artic ... rural-life

Even further back, the "highly urbanized" Roman Empire was still dominantly rural.
By the standards of pre-modern economies, the Roman Empire was highly urbanized.

According to recent work, there were some 1,400 sites with urban characteristics in the Roman world in the Imperial period.[49] At its peak, the city of Rome had at least one million inhabitants, a total not equaled again in Europe until the 19th century. As the imperial capital, Rome was sustained by transfers in kind from throughout the empire; no other city could be sustained at this level. Other major cities in the empire (Alexandria, Antioch, Carthage, Ephesus, Salona etc.) had populations of about a few hundred thousand. Of the remaining cities, most were quite small, usually possessing only 10–15,000 inhabitants. The cumulative urban population of the empire is estimated at around 14 million (using a population threshold of 5,000 individuals), indicating an urbanization rate of at least 25-30 % to be consistent with conventional estimates for the total population, comparable to those in the 19th century.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demograph ... banization

It makes sense that cities not have been the primary place where humans have lived for all of history. People had to engage in food production to sustain life.

For most of history, labour was manual with some assistance from beasts of burden. Productivity was low because of this.

Most food production occurred and occurs in rural areas, not in cities. Food production is more efficient now as labour is highly mechanized and automated, resulting in less need for human labour in food production.
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MusicBox wrote: That CharlieBo13 guy from Youtube, how has he managed not to get killed visiting all those dangerous ghettoes in the middle of the night? How? He must look like a dirtbag to blend in.
He's driving around in a cop car Grinning Face With Smiling Eyes
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interesting
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I like old videos filmed with big VHS cam from the 80s. It’s my fondest timeline and everything seems to stop dead in it’s tracks.

I guess it reminds me of “Night walk” which aired on global television during the 90s? When some guy would walk around Yonge street, into establishments etc. There was also a similar show where it was exclusively behind a car windshield where they drove around downtown Toronto as well.

Of course all those places have been demolished. Sam the record man, arcade emporiums, eclectic shops, etc. I guess about the only one left standing is THe Brass Rails lol.
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Supercooled wrote: THe Brass Rails lol.
Its the only one left in southern Ontario probably, the lap dance business is dead. Remember Fantasia on Yong st north?
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Supercooled wrote: I like old videos filmed with big VHS cam from the 80s. It’s my fondest timeline and everything seems to stop dead in it’s tracks.

I guess it reminds me of “Night walk” which aired on global television during the 90s? When some guy would walk around Yonge street, into establishments etc. There was also a similar show where it was exclusively behind a car windshield where they drove around downtown Toronto as well.

Of course all those places have been demolished. Sam the record man, arcade emporiums, eclectic shops, etc. I guess about the only one left standing is THe Brass Rails lol.
+1 Don't recall Nightwalk but my dad loved that car downtown 'show'.
The richest 1% of this country owns half our country’s wealth, 5 trillion dollars, one-third of that comes from hard work, two-thirds comes from inheritance, interest on interest accumulating to widows and idiot sons, and what I do.. <find the rest>

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