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Suggestions for Cat weight loss

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  • Jun 6th, 2019 6:01 pm
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jan 1, 2013
1797 posts
977 upvotes
Durham

Suggestions for Cat weight loss

Our cat is about 6 years old and is on the chubby side. Weighed him around 18 lbs and has a floppy belly. We have been more diligent in giving him 2 feeding cycles, morning and evening. He loves wet and dry food. We feed him about a quarter can of wet food (B.F.F.) in the morning and another quarter in the evening. He also gets about a quarter cup of dry food with each wet serving.

He is not too active. When he goes outside he just sits on the deck. Inside he plays a little but not too much unless catnip is involved. He just does not seem to be dropping weight.

Any suggestions? Thanks,
13 replies
Deal Addict
Oct 6, 2015
2463 posts
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Dry food = carbs. Which has both high caloric content, as well as creates insulin response which causes additional consumption. So basically you need to get him off the dry food pretty much entirely. And the 'wet' food should be as low carb as possible.

Basically just like a human. Its next to impossible to exercise out of a weight problem, especially for a cat.

If the cat is able to drop some weight, then maybe it will be naturally more inclined to be a bit more active. (ie: imagine if your normal body weight was 160 pounds, but you were 240 pounds, ie: 50% overweight, certainly your ability to engage in physical activity would be impacted!).

I know when I had a cat, by the time I figured it all out, there was very little difference between feeding him store-bought "human" chicken, hamburger, stewing beef, etc., compared to buying canned cat food cost-wise, and he certainly was eating much healthier with "human" food. Cats can be notoriously picky eaters though. But that dry food is like a human dining on potato chips -- you'd never consider a substantial amount of your diet , let alone 50% potato chips, to be healthy. Except that's what 'dry' food manufacturers magically think is acceptable for a cat.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jan 1, 2013
1797 posts
977 upvotes
Durham
burnt69 wrote: Dry food = carbs. Which has both high caloric content, as well as creates insulin response which causes additional consumption. So basically you need to get him off the dry food pretty much entirely. And the 'wet' food should be as low carb as possible.

Basically just like a human. Its next to impossible to exercise out of a weight problem, especially for a cat.

If the cat is able to drop some weight, then maybe it will be naturally more inclined to be a bit more active. (ie: imagine if your normal body weight was 160 pounds, but you were 240 pounds, ie: 50% overweight, certainly your ability to engage in physical activity would be impacted!).

I know when I had a cat, by the time I figured it all out, there was very little difference between feeding him store-bought "human" chicken, hamburger, stewing beef, etc., compared to buying canned cat food cost-wise, and he certainly was eating much healthier with "human" food. Cats can be notoriously picky eaters though. But that dry food is like a human dining on potato chips -- you'd never consider a substantial amount of your diet , let alone 50% potato chips, to be healthy. Except that's what 'dry' food manufacturers magically think is acceptable for a cat.
Thanks for the feed back. His wet food is def low carb and the reason we went with that brand as recommended. Will see how he does by upping his wet food while slowly lowering the dry food.
Deal Addict
Oct 6, 2015
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Kkhan15 wrote: Thanks for the feed back. His wet food is def low carb and the reason we went with that brand as recommended. Will see how he does by upping his wet food while slowly lowering the dry food.
Yeah definitely give that a try, but its probably going to be a multi-year process and results will be very slow.
Deal Addict
Jan 28, 2014
3404 posts
643 upvotes
Kkhan - We once had a small cat. We only fed her wet food but as it turned out the food had an appetite stimulant added (not advertised) and many cats gained a lot of weight including ours. We obviously changed her food and also reduced the amount. We no longer have cats (but a dog) but we found that reducing the food by a bit, rather than the treats that our cats (and dogs) expected did the trick. I have spoken to other pet Moms and they did the same - the treats are sacred! Especially to our current dog who can also count. A pet on a diet is a terrible thing. Best of luck. If you don't give your cat treats then you will really need it! Somehow, despite everything we have managed to keep our dogs and cats (when we had them) within reason - meals, snacks, etc. etc. - we have always have food HOOVERS.

By the way, for those with dogs watch our for the term EAT on the dog food bags (perhaps it is also on cat food). If your dog or cat does not need it as they are in fact food obsessed as it is, then DON'T buy it. We went through this but I did not notice it at first - but then I did because it only took 2 meals. It was not pretty.
Deal Addict
Aug 1, 2006
1672 posts
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Toronto
I give my dog steamed green beans every day to help with weight loss. Since cats need more animal protein than dogs, you are probably safe with just giving a few green beans a day to your cat to help fill her up.
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Jul 19, 2012
1905 posts
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Canada
Kkhan15 wrote: Our cat is about 6 years old and is on the chubby side. Weighed him around 18 lbs and has a floppy belly. We have been more diligent in giving him 2 feeding cycles, morning and evening. He loves wet and dry food. We feed him about a quarter can of wet food (B.F.F.) in the morning and another quarter in the evening. He also gets about a quarter cup of dry food with each wet serving.

He is not too active. When he goes outside he just sits on the deck. Inside he plays a little but not too much unless catnip is involved. He just does not seem to be dropping weight.

Any suggestions? Thanks,
See a veterinarian something more sinister could be happening to your poor cat.
Member
May 5, 2014
392 posts
242 upvotes
Toronto
A good feeding guide I follow is by calories for my cat. Generally you want to feed them 15-20 calories per pound. My vet says 9-10lbs for my cat is ideal for her frame so I've been feeding around 170-200 calories a day. Your canned and dry food should say how much calories are in per can and per cup.

Currently, I'm doing 1 can of canned food a day split into two servings which is 170-180 calories depending on the brand I use. I'm planning on transitioning to half dry and half canned, the dry food I'm using states 440cal/cup so feeding her 1/4 cup is 110 calories + 1/2 canned gives me a total of ~190 calories.

See what your vet says the ideal weight for your cat is before counting calories in their food. Keep in mind cats will eat when they're bored or understimulated just like humans. Gradually lower their calorie intake or else you'll run into serious health problems. My cat always meows for food but you have to stick to your guns and not give in until they get used to the routine of scheduled meal times.
Newbie
Aug 12, 2012
23 posts
23 upvotes
MARKHAM
My cat is a bit overweight as well.. I mix a lot of water into his canned food.. that seemed to help a bit... The dry really made him gain weight because he loved to eat it..
Deal Fanatic
May 22, 2003
5864 posts
2930 upvotes
Vancouver
It's definitely the dry food. One of our cats was almost 20 pounds when she got surrendered to the shelter and was eating dry food. Since she's been switched to wet cat food, she is now down to about 13 pounds. When I was in elementary school we had a cat - the vet recommended her to go on Hill's "Diet" dry food. Poor cat was still overweight despite eating less than the recommended daily amount and we didn't understand why - now we know better
Sr. Member
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Jan 21, 2013
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in a bubble
I have the same problem....my cat refuses to eat Wet food. she is always sitting by her bowl wanting MORE! she eats purina ONE kibble. shes so tubby she cant jump up on the bed . Crying Face
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May 22, 2005
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Good Morning
In regards to transitioning to wet food, you can't expect cats to change their diet immediately.

When I transitioned my cats to raw, they were on purely kibble. I had to slowly change the mix of wet:dry from 90:10, to 50:50, then finally to 90:10, and then purely on wet.

Once they were on wet, I did the same slow transition to 100% raw. Occasionally they are stubborn, so I have some ground up kibble and treats that I sprinkle on the top.

Purinas Fortiflora and also nutritional yeast helps a lot too when they're being really stubborn.
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Oct 6, 2015
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ammaretto wrote: I have the same problem....my cat refuses to eat Wet food. she is always sitting by her bowl wanting MORE! she eats purina ONE kibble. shes so tubby she cant jump up on the bed . Crying Face
Yeah humans habituated to eating junk food find it hard to kick the habit too. As the other poster states, a gradual transition might work better.
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Feb 11, 2009
232 posts
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Vancouver, BC
It took years for my cat to start really eating wet food. He still eats half and half now (because I can't get up at 2am, 3am, 4am ...etc. He is old and only eats very little at a time and he only eat "fresh" wet food. So I am leaving dry food for him overnight) . But at least wet food disappears from his food dish at meat time now.
Give your cat time.

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