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  • Aug 22nd, 2020 10:07 pm
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[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 21, 2004
2671 posts
836 upvotes
Winnipeg

Sump Pumps

I'm hoping to get some guidance on sump pumps. Mine is ~10 years old and I'd like to proactively replace it before I run into any problems.

I started looking at this Wayne CDU1000 1 HP model www.amazon.ca/dp/B0062FTMV0/
They also have a 3/4 HP as well.

The reviews look mostly good, but there were quite a few about a certain part of it failing which then had me looking elsewhere.

I've seen other names such as Red Lion, Liberty, and Zoeller.

Any thoughts?
5 replies
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Feb 15, 2005
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6100 gph seems like overkill. I have a Liberty 287 that seems to be handling the wacky weather we've been having just fine. My Kasa app is showing daily usage of 0.15kwh. The vertical float is different from other pumps but you still need to wack it every so often to ensure it isn't stuck and moves freely.
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Oct 13, 2007
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Edmonton
pswart wrote: I'm hoping to get some guidance on sump pumps. Mine is ~10 years old and I'd like to proactively replace it before I run into any problems.

I started looking at this Wayne CDU1000 1 HP model www.amazon.ca/dp/B0062FTMV0/
They also have a 3/4 HP as well.

The reviews look mostly good, but there were quite a few about a certain part of it failing which then had me looking elsewhere.

I've seen other names such as Red Lion, Liberty, and Zoeller.

Any thoughts?
1 HP seems a little bit like overkill for a normal residential application.

Mine just crapped out and I had it replaced. Every time I have had mine replaced by a plumber, they have put in a 1/3 HP.

"The most common sizes are 1/3 horsepower that pump 35 gallons of water per minute and 1/2 horsepower that pump 60 gallons per minute. Choosing the proper size for your application is important – too large or too small will result in a shorter lifespan. A general rule of thumb is to replace your pump with the same size that’s installed. Upgrading from a 1/3 horsepower to a 1/2 horsepower sump pump could be considered if your home is in a high water table."

Ten years is a good run. What is your current model and HP? Why don't you just replace it with the same one?
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 21, 2004
2671 posts
836 upvotes
Winnipeg
starchoice wrote: 1 HP seems a little bit like overkill for a normal residential application.

Mine just crapped out and I had it replaced. Every time I have had mine replaced by a plumber, they have put in a 1/3 HP.

"The most common sizes are 1/3 horsepower that pump 35 gallons of water per minute and 1/2 horsepower that pump 60 gallons per minute. Choosing the proper size for your application is important – too large or too small will result in a shorter lifespan. A general rule of thumb is to replace your pump with the same size that’s installed. Upgrading from a 1/3 horsepower to a 1/2 horsepower sump pump could be considered if your home is in a high water table."

Ten years is a good run. What is your current model and HP? Why don't you just replace it with the same one?
I haven't actually gone in my crawl space to check what's currently there as I don't know much about them and don't want to break anything. Maybe I'll venture down there and have a look.
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Jul 12, 2020
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Ontario
Anything OP can update on the thread?
I just bought a house and it's sump pump isn't working. I'm debating if I need a replacement or not (home inspector says not required and lots of houses in the area doesn't have it).

Would be interested in knowing what OP ended up getting/reason for getting the model? And perhaps how much it costed.

Thanks!
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Jun 26, 2019
1994 posts
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xChao20 wrote: Anything OP can update on the thread?
I just bought a house and it's sump pump isn't working. I'm debating if I need a replacement or not (home inspector says not required and lots of houses in the area doesn't have it).

Would be interested in knowing what OP ended up getting/reason for getting the model? And perhaps how much it costed.

Thanks!
If your house has a sump pump, you probably need it. Is your sump pit dry or is there water in it?

Your foundation drainage system all drains to your sump pit, it may be possible that your house is built in a sandy area, and for that reason the majority of storms you might not need a sump pump for. However, in a larger storm you could need it, there is a direction connection from outside of your foundation to inside your basement right now. All things considered, its just wise and also pretty cheap insurance to just install a sump pump.

Also, it should be noted it is very common to have houses even next door to each other to have sump pumps when their neighbour doesn't. Commonly some houses can connect to sewers by gravity for their foundation drainage where others need a pump.

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