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surge protector for garage door opener?

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[OP]
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Jul 20, 2007
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Brampton

surge protector for garage door opener?

Just wondering what you folks think of adding a surge protector between a garage door opener unit and the ceiling outlet. I'm not sure if Sears Craftsman units have built-in power surge protection, or how sensitive they are to surges. For example, if a power surge hits my home, could it fry my garage door opener? If recommend, would any surge protector be sufficient provided it has enough protection re: joules?
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Deal Expert
Aug 2, 2001
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If you are worried about your home being susceptible to power surges, why not take the one-time hit and install protection at your electrical panel?
[OP]
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Jul 20, 2007
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Brampton
TrevorK wrote: If you are worried about your home being susceptible to power surges, why not take the one-time hit and install protection at your electrical panel?
Thank you TrevorK, for the suggestion. Is there one you personally recommend? someone in a thread, recommended one called Eaton Whole House Surge Protection.
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Oct 16, 2001
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TrevorK wrote: If you are worried about your home being susceptible to power surges, why not take the one-time hit and install protection at your electrical panel?
We did that our last electrical upgrade for our deck. Since they were there cost was very low since they had to do panel stuff anyway.

I still have surge protectors, but they are in use because thats what we had, more or less now just functional power bars
Deal Expert
Aug 2, 2001
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speedy726 wrote: Thank you TrevorK, for the suggestion. Is there one you personally recommend? someone in a thread, recommended one called Eaton Whole House Surge Protection.
I am not an electrician, so I do not want to pretend to have an expert opinion.

There is an electrical thread on RFD, perhaps post your question there and they can provide you feedback. They have most likely used many brands, and might have seen the aftermath of ones that did not work properly.
ask-me-anything-about-home-electrical-r ... s-1272457/
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Dec 24, 2005
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Toronto
speedy726 wrote: Just wondering what you folks think of adding a surge protector between a garage door opener unit and the ceiling outlet. I'm not sure if Sears Craftsman units have built-in power surge protection, or how sensitive they are to surges. For example, if a power surge hits my home, could it fry my garage door opener? If recommend, would any surge protector be sufficient provided it has enough protection re: joules?
I'm not a licensed electrician but I think this would be non-compliant with CEC rules that state you are not to use any kind of extension cord with a garage door opener. Extension cords are for temporary use only and not intended for fixed appliances, such as garage door openers.
Nothing to see here folks...
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Dec 28, 2007
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I've had a Craftsman garage door opener in our house since 1993 and never had a problem with it. I've never even thought about a surge protector for it and don't plan on putting one in anytime soon.
Temp. Banned
Mar 29, 2015
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Wood Bridge
when I bought my house, the prev owner not only ran a extension chord to the opener, it was angled plug, so he used a pliers and ripped out the ground prong and stuck it upside down cus he wanted the angle to go up from the outlet not down, and stapled it to the wall, he atleast used those plastic wire staples.

so I will have to rip out the chord and put a hydro box in the ceiling, cant be that hard right?
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Stronzo1 wrote: when I bought my house, the prev owner not only ran a extension chord to the opener, it was angled plug, so he used a pliers and ripped out the ground prong and stuck it upside down cus he wanted the angle to go up from the outlet not down, and stapled it to the wall, he atleast used those plastic wire staples.

so I will have to rip out the chord and put a hydro box in the ceiling, cant be that hard right?
Ive got small extensions on mine for almost 8 years now, and was from the previous owner. Ive seen it with many, as electrical is usualy run before the garage door openers are thought of

Will I change it, probably not.
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Mar 21, 2002
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I believe it was in HD that I saw a surge protector specifically intended for use with the garage door opener. It was made by one of the opener companies (Chamberlain?). Anyway I wasn't interested because I installed a whole house protector on the panel which protects everything including kitchen and laundry room appliances which are increasingly electronic these days. In my previous house the circuit board in the Sears opener went just before I was due to move out. It was only about 6 years old and I suspected a surge might have been responsible so I've put more effort an money into protecting everything in my current house.

As for long term use of extension cords, a really bad idea. A neighbor's house went up in flames because of a bad extension cord. Do things properly and extend the standard wiring to where you need it. As for extension cords well, I threw out all the old ones I had and replaced them all with full 15 amp rated (most cheap ones aren't) high quality cords. And I only use them for very temporary situations.
Member
Jul 19, 2007
312 posts
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Guelph
I have a surge protector on mine... learned my lesson the hard way after a lightning storm fried my old garage door opener. The logic board needed replacing, which was just shy of the cost of a brand new opener.
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Jun 22, 2007
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Caledon
Three of my co-workers lost their TVs due to this surge issues in the past few months .. even when they are connected via Belkin Surge Protector

Dont know how much we can trust with this surge bars ..

I may go with EATON for whole house....

Complete Home (CHSPT2 Series)
http://www.lowes.ca/load-center-accesso ... 09651.html
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Dec 24, 2005
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Spidey wrote: Ive got small extensions on mine for almost 8 years now, and was from the previous owner. Ive seen it with many, as electrical is usualy run before the garage door openers are thought of

Will I change it, probably not.
Just because many ppl have an extension cord to their garage door opener doesn't make it right. It's against code, and I only learned that recently. If there isn't an outlet close to the GDO then an electrician should be hired to install an outlet.

That's if you care about your house being up to code... if not, do whatever the heck you want
Nothing to see here folks...
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loonieryan wrote: Just because many ppl have an extension cord to their garage door opener doesn't make it right. It's against code, and I only learned that recently. If there isn't an outlet close to the GDO then an electrician should be hired to install an outlet.

That's if you care about your house being up to code... if not, do whatever the heck you want
Some people arent as anal as others. Stuff can be up to code then suddenly a rule is brought in and now its not code.

MY outlets are in the roof, but far enough away to have to have a small extension. Code to me isnt worth the few hundred dollars to move an outlet two feet
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Mar 21, 2006
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Mayoo wrote: Three of my co-workers lost their TVs due to this surge issues in the past few months .. even when they are connected via Belkin Surge Protector
A whole-house surge suppressor should not be trusted to protect all of the electronics in your home. You will still need local surge protection for each device.
Belkin is not really a proper surge suppressor. It's an MOV that probably wore down over time.

This is one of my favourite videos for demonstrating cheap power bars that claim surge suppression.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j53qtYc5ZeE
Audio - Video - Data - Security - This is what I do
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Jul 6, 2009
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Mayoo wrote: Three of my co-workers lost their TVs due to this surge issues in the past few months .. even when they are connected via Belkin Surge Protector
Trust that protector to do exactly what it manufacturer claims it does. It does not claim to protect from another type of surge that typically causes damage. Most only recommend it on hearsay and advertising recommendations. Not upon what manufacturer spec numbers and other facts say.

Did you really think a 2 cm part inside that protector would stop what three miles of sky could not? A protector adjacent to electronics must somehow stop, block, or absorb that energy. Do you really think its hundreds or thousand joules will absorb surges that are hundreds of thousands of joules? That is also what naive consumers are told by retail salesmen.

A completely different device, also called a surge protector, does not try to do mythical protection. Instead it connects hundreds of thousands of joules harmlessly to earth ground. Then a surge is not inside the house trying to destroy TVs, clocks, CFL light bulbs, doorbell, furnace, etc.

No protector does protection. None. Nada. In facilities that cannot have damage, the protector connects to what does protection. Single point earth ground. Unfortunately even that simple explaination becomes too complex for some homeowners. Due to what advertising has already told them.

Protectors are simple science. A 'whole house' protector is rated at least 50,000 amps. That defines protector life expectancy after many direct lightning strikes. Protection during each surge is defined by something completely different: quality of and connection to single point earth ground. That is the 'art'. That is also ignored by people who do not ask, "What does a protector do?" Effective protection means a homeowner knows where hundreds of thousands of joules harmlessly dissipiate. It is the only solution used in facilities that can never have damage to electronics - despite so many who instead recite myths that foolishly recommend power bar protectors - by even ignoring manufacturer spec numbers.

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