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[OP]
Newbie
Dec 7, 2011
37 posts
5 upvotes
RICHMOND HILL

surge protector safety

Hi all,

I have a surge protector (Trickle Star 1810) that has "switched" outlets. Power is automatically cut to these outlets when no motion or IR (from the remote) is detected for a certain period of time. Power to the outlet is also cut when the TV is turned off manually.

If I have an LCD TV plugged into one of these outlets, is the constant on/off damaging to the TV? The TV is turned off manually about 6 times a day.

thanks
3 replies
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 14, 2010
1523 posts
960 upvotes
Barrie ON
Since you say that the switched outlets are turned on/off as the TV is turned on/off, then you must have the TV plugged into the control outlet.

The power bar is just monitoring the current flow through the control outlet to determine if that device is on or off.

The power is never removed from the control receptacle. If it were to be removed, then no current would flow when the device was turned on, and the power bar would have no way of knowing the device had been turned back on.

With regards to damaging a TV by removing and restoring the AC supply, I would say no-way.
[OP]
Newbie
Dec 7, 2011
37 posts
5 upvotes
RICHMOND HILL
Thanks Rick.

Maybe I should re-frame my question.

Will the TV last longer 1) the way I have it set-up now; or 2) TV is plugged into a regular surge protector and is on standby power when not in use
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 14, 2010
1523 posts
960 upvotes
Barrie ON
jacobins wrote: Will the TV last longer 1) the way I have it set-up now; or 2) TV is plugged into a regular surge protector and is on standby power when not in use
Well, I'm still assuming that the TV is plugged into the CONTROL outlet of your Trickle Star. If that is true, then.........

The TV will not see any difference between the Trickle Star, and a regular power bar (with or without) built-in surge protection. As I mentioned, the voltage on the CONTROL outlet is constant. Only the SWITCHED outlets lose power.

Now if you are asking about plugging the TV into a power bar that you turn on and off, then the answer is not as simple.

Any AC operated device can handle power failures and restorals. But if the circuitry isn't engineered properly, initial current flow in solid state circuits can be higher when first energized. That along with repeated heating and cooling cycles can reduce component life.

So turning off the power may save literally 50 cents a month in hydro costs, but it could shorten the lifespan of poorly designed devices.

You also should consider the balance between saving 50 cents, and the inconvenience of turning on the power bar each time before sitting in the Lazy Boy and using your remote or Google Assistant to actually turn on the TV.

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