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Take the Blame?

  • Last Updated:
  • Jun 8th, 2016 7:10 pm
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[OP]
Deal Addict
Feb 16, 2010
1088 posts
348 upvotes

Take the Blame?

Lets say, Mr X is working as an Engineer at office. This boss tells him to go to shop and inspect some part, which is 3rd party vendor.

The responsibility above does not falls into Mr X's scope, but he still accepts the assignment. Mr X has no prior experience in performing above duty. There are lot of different parts. All of them are pass and site has no issue with them.

Boss is happy, until one part was not manufactured correct and passes through mr X and goes to site. Which is rejected due to a defect.

On the same project there are other two engineers who made similar mistakes and are still working.

Now Mr. X's boss is always bringing up how he messed up that issue. There are layoffs going on in Mr X's company. Lot of people are getting laid off every month.

Mr X is in process of applying for other jobs and had some interviews which are in process.

What should Mr X do?

1) quit and focus on finding new job
2) let boss know, other 2 people messed up. Why he is getting picked on? might escelate the situation.
3)keep working and wait for the hammer to drop
11 replies
Deal Addict
Dec 10, 2012
3616 posts
1034 upvotes
Canada
find a new job then quit. duhhh
Member
Nov 19, 2011
292 posts
66 upvotes
Calgary
If you leave just cause you wanna leave you can't get ei, so unless being there is truly a bad thing for that person wait to get laid off or find a job first. But this person can just go talk to there supervisor and ask why it is something that he keeps bring up, seems like the manager is trying to make the engg look bad. Either way this person should look for a different job, this manager seems to have grow to dislike this worker and when that happens the best you will get being under someone like this is staying were you currently are.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Feb 16, 2010
1088 posts
348 upvotes
badsha wrote: find a new job then quit. duhhh
Here is the dilemma. The company said, they want to keep him. While sending mixed signals.
Deal Addict
Feb 14, 2016
1754 posts
1176 upvotes
one part was not manufactured correct and passes through mr X and goes to site. Which is rejected due to a defect.

Clearly made the mistake, you can't really say your boss is blaming on you, man
You gotta live up to the expectation as a professional; what if faulty item was actually used? and it could cost people's life

I don't think your boss is blaming you, you did clearly messed up; he is just clearly reminding you so you don't make same mistake again

Plus, you can't really say oh other two made similar mistake and nothing happen to them, why me? unless you are like 6 years old
Deal Guru
User avatar
Mar 23, 2008
12213 posts
8626 upvotes
Edmonton
If the company is going through lay-offs, he's kind of a fool not to be looking for a new job anyway... So my advice is for him to shut up, do his job, and look for another job in the meantime. If he gets a job, he never has to hear about the issue, and maybe he can even negotiate a buyout (once he accepts an offer, and before giving his notice) rather than the company having to let someone else go. If he doesn't get a job, he's no worse off than he is now.

C
Deal Addict
Apr 27, 2017
1755 posts
1171 upvotes
Calgary
ironbrah wrote: Here is the dilemma. The company said, they want to keep him. While sending mixed signals.
Don't Quit. He can get EI if he is laid off.
If he enjoys his job, he shouldn't focus on finding another job. He should be working harder to show he should be kept.

If he gets laid off, then EI, then start looking.
Deal Addict
Jul 24, 2003
1434 posts
73 upvotes
stay working - find another job in background

worst case - collect EI
[removed]
Deal Expert
User avatar
Jun 9, 2003
24797 posts
1910 upvotes
Markham, ON
ironbrah wrote:
The responsibility above does not falls into Mr X's scope, but he still accepts the assignment. Mr X has no prior experience in performing above duty. There are lot of different parts. All of them are pass and site has no issue with them.
depends...does Mr X document, if any, the due diligence that he performed to determined the parts are manufactured according to specs?

is there sign offs? did the manager sign off?

seriously...as a engineer, or even just basic knowledge, if this is done, ultimately this needs to be performed so that you'll can get compensated from the 3rd party manufacturer.
Jr. Member
Jul 15, 2009
160 posts
64 upvotes
Edmonton
There are multiple issues at play here, so let's separate them and tackle:

1. Did he messed up? Yes, he did. Even though the boss has the managing duty to utilize qualified employee for a task, it is always the engineer's ultimate responsibility to ensure that one is qualified to perform the task. This is basic engineering law & ethics. Always tell the boss if you're not qualified (and document the response). Even if boss is willing to take the risk, but are you?? remember the ultimate responsibility is on you, so if injury or death resulted, your ass will be behind bar.

2. Peer performance comparison - comparing to the others means nothing at work (faults or achievements), the only meaningful performance matrix is whether your boss is happy with your work. Which bring us to:

3. Communication and cooperation with supervisor - Depending if the boss was using this incident to pick on the engineer as jokes, if it is, then go tell the boss you have learned your lesson and it is not funny any more. If the boss is using it to berated you, then you have an issue and the only resolution will be a) look for another job and then quit.
b) resolve with boss behind closed door by asking what you can do to improve your performance and meeting his/her expectations.

4. Career advancement - screwed up or not, layoff or not, regardless the conditions, a smart professional always keep an eye out on the market. If you have been applying to jobs and getting interviews (and maybe offers as well), meaning you have a market out there and if conditions are right (compensation, position grade, responsibility level, benefits, company reputation, etc), then you can decide to jump ship regardless of the other issues.

5. Company down size / layoff handling - it a fact, companies hire and fire all the time, my company used to fire the bottom feeders even when the market and office were doing great. Depending on your own personal situation, some people needs to look for other opportunities as soon as there's a rumour going around. Others can wait for the hammer to drop, collect severance and EI, and treat it as a great opportunity to take a longer vacation. The importance is always plan what's best for your own situation.

Bottom line is words are cheap. it doesn't matter what the company tells you (by company you meant boss? VP? HR?), nothing is guaranteed and you alone are responsible for your career and well being, so plan and act accordingly.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Oct 1, 2011
6337 posts
1501 upvotes
benjuotterly wrote: 2. Peer performance comparison - comparing to the others means nothing at work (faults or achievements), the only meaningful performance matrix is whether your boss is happy with your work.
I agree. Don't do this. Highlighting others' mistakes has NOTHING to do with Mr. X's own mistake and has nothing to do with how he can improve. He might feel that the standards for criticism aren't consistent (and sometimes they aren't), but pointing it out doesn't solve the situation nor make him look good.

1) + 3). Keep working while looking for new job.

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