Real Estate

Tarion - Still useless in 2021 - Your opinion?

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  • Feb 15th, 2022 8:37 am
[OP]
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 9, 2005
1048 posts
392 upvotes

Tarion - Still useless in 2021 - Your opinion?

Simple issues and going through hoops and I never hear any follow ups from them - I have yet to get an inspection done but already preparing for the worst.

Has anyone ever actually won a dispute against the builder via Tarion?
25 replies
Jr. Member
Sep 27, 2020
116 posts
68 upvotes
Yes. Actually Tarion pays themselves if the builder doesn't complete on time. You just need to stick with it and follow all their deadlines.
Deal Addict
Jan 15, 2017
4873 posts
4661 upvotes
Ottawa
Challenge is that during the pandemic Tarion has allowed the builder lots of leeway in their operations. Dealing with deficiencies is stressful enough but during a pandemic it must be a nightmare.
Deal Addict
Apr 29, 2010
1227 posts
2378 upvotes
GTA
We bought a new build in 2019 and tarion worked great for us. Always came to fix whatever our complaint was and sometimes took care of other things we messed up ourselves (paint scratches etc)
[OP]
Deal Addict
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Nov 9, 2005
1048 posts
392 upvotes
lolbeast wrote: We bought a new build in 2019 and tarion worked great for us. Always came to fix whatever our complaint was and sometimes took care of other things we messed up ourselves (paint scratches etc)
Wow that is a new one - Tarion asked the builder to fix your paint scratches??? Did you put that in the PDI?

I am surprised that Tarion would ask the builder to repair client damage.
Deal Addict
Apr 29, 2010
1227 posts
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GTA
Cybersid wrote: Wow that is a new one - Tarion asked the builder to fix your paint scratches??? Did you put that in the PDI?

I am surprised that Tarion would ask the builder to repair client damage.
The inspector was nice and told me they’d cover it as a favor. We had a great experience with tarion every time
[OP]
Deal Addict
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Nov 9, 2005
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lolbeast wrote: The inspector was nice and told me they’d cover it as a favor. We had a great experience with tarion every time
Interesting, complete opposite for myself and the neighborhood so far.
Deal Addict
Apr 29, 2010
1227 posts
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GTA
Cybersid wrote: Interesting, complete opposite for myself and the neighborhood so far.
I guess it depends on the guy you get that day. Usually one guy covers an entire area.
Deal Expert
Feb 29, 2008
17738 posts
15387 upvotes
Tarrana & The Ri…
That’s why it’s important to find a good builder with a good track record. Tarion is utterly useless. Massive conflict of interest.
Last edited by JayLove06 on Feb 1st, 2021 9:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.
[OP]
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 9, 2005
1048 posts
392 upvotes
JayLove06 wrote: That’s why it’s important to find a good builder with a track record. Ration is utterly useless. Massive conflict of interest.
Agreed, 2nd house new build - Tarion is still useless. The contractors working on the home were the bottom of the barrel . Everyone in the neighborhood complaining (All detached houses)
Deal Expert
Feb 29, 2008
17738 posts
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Tarrana & The Ri…
JayLove06 wrote: That’s why it’s important to find a good builder with a good track record. Tarion is utterly useless. Massive conflict of interest.
Adding to my post, Tarion continues to screw purchasers. They give the builder months delay to resolve issues, the builder doesn't do anything, then you're forced to pay for an inspection and Tarion gives the builder another 3-4 months to make repairs. The fact that you're forced to pay them is shameful.
[OP]
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Nov 9, 2005
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Agreed, I just gave up and got my own contractors to repair the mess.
Deal Expert
Feb 29, 2008
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Tarrana & The Ri…
Cybersid wrote: Agreed, I just gave up and got my own contractors to repair the mess.
The sad reality.
Newbie
Jun 18, 2018
19 posts
11 upvotes
You initially pay $250.00 to request a conciliation. If even one item is determined to be warrantable, your money is refunded. If none of the items are warrantable, Tarion keeps the $250.00. The reason for payment up front is to curb every homeowner requesting a conciliation. If conciliations were no charge, it would be cheaper for a homeowner to have Tarion in rather than having a house inspector.

If your builder is competent and follows the warranty, they most likely have advised that something you reported is not covered by the warranty. An example could be scratches on hardwood floor reported on a year-end form. The homeowner does not accept the builder's explanation. The builder can then direct you to the Construction Performance Guidelines whereby you can look up the majority of reported deficiencies and find the warranty coverage, tolerances, etc. Again, the homeowner rejects the answer and therefore calls a conciliation. Tarion should rule the damaged floors as non-warrantable and will therefore keep the $250.00. The homeowner could have checked this item out for themselves and avoided having a conciliation but they chose to involve Tarion and there is a cost associated with this because the item was not warrantable and the homeowner did not accept the builder's answer nor check it out for themselves in the CPG.
[OP]
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 9, 2005
1048 posts
392 upvotes
ServiceRep wrote: You initially pay $250.00 to request a conciliation. If even one item is determined to be warrantable, your money is refunded. If none of the items are warrantable, Tarion keeps the $250.00. The reason for payment up front is to curb every homeowner requesting a conciliation. If conciliations were no charge, it would be cheaper for a homeowner to have Tarion in rather than having a house inspector.

If your builder is competent and follows the warranty, they most likely have advised that something you reported is not covered by the warranty. An example could be scratches on hardwood floor reported on a year-end form. The homeowner does not accept the builder's explanation. The builder can then direct you to the Construction Performance Guidelines whereby you can look up the majority of reported deficiencies and find the warranty coverage, tolerances, etc. Again, the homeowner rejects the answer and therefore calls a conciliation. Tarion should rule the damaged floors as non-warrantable and will therefore keep the $250.00. The homeowner could have checked this item out for themselves and avoided having a conciliation but they chose to involve Tarion and there is a cost associated with this because the item was not warrantable and the homeowner did not accept the builder's answer nor check it out for themselves in the CPG.
Tarion will just approve anything when the builder issues a fix- we had multiple issues like scratches (PDI)/stains (PDI)/missing items (PDI) /soffit hanging down and the builder did the most BASIC job (ended up being uglier then before) and Tarion approved it stating it is "within guidelines".

For a 1.8 million dollar home I would of expected better from both parties. Tarion also denied my ask for a warranty extension due to covid (just for 1 DAY!) to book my home inspector in - but yet they themselves are 'delayed due to covid' and are in bed with the builder.

Anyway - I fixed it all via third parties. Total waste of time via Tarion or whatever they are called now.
Deal Expert
Feb 29, 2008
17738 posts
15387 upvotes
Tarrana & The Ri…
ServiceRep wrote: You initially pay $250.00 to request a conciliation. If even one item is determined to be warrantable, your money is refunded. If none of the items are warrantable, Tarion keeps the $250.00. The reason for payment up front is to curb every homeowner requesting a conciliation. If conciliations were no charge, it would be cheaper for a homeowner to have Tarion in rather than having a house inspector.

If your builder is competent and follows the warranty, they most likely have advised that something you reported is not covered by the warranty. An example could be scratches on hardwood floor reported on a year-end form. The homeowner does not accept the builder's explanation. The builder can then direct you to the Construction Performance Guidelines whereby you can look up the majority of reported deficiencies and find the warranty coverage, tolerances, etc. Again, the homeowner rejects the answer and therefore calls a conciliation. Tarion should rule the damaged floors as non-warrantable and will therefore keep the $250.00. The homeowner could have checked this item out for themselves and avoided having a conciliation but they chose to involve Tarion and there is a cost associated with this because the item was not warrantable and the homeowner did not accept the builder's answer nor check it out for themselves in the CPG.
Understood and I think most purchasers are reasonable. A scratch on a year end form isn't warrantable. But items on a PDI or 30 day form that are blatant should be dealt with. People don't get pissed off with tarion over a scratch on a floor that they put on their 1 year form. They get pissed over a missing part, damaged item, something that doesn't work or wasn't installed properly, etc only to see the builder ompletely ignore it.

Now with COVID, tarion has given the builder months upon months of time to sit around and do nothing. As you said, it depends on the builder, but if that's the case why is Tarion even around?

It was better when you could actually go on the tarion site and see the amount of inspections each builder got. Now that is hidden. I don't know why.
Newbie
Jun 18, 2018
19 posts
11 upvotes
Don't confuse the 30-day with the pdi. The pdi is the only record of note whereby damages will be covered by the warranty because they were obviously there prior to the homeowner taking possession. Damages to a hardwood floor reported on the 30-day form would not be covered because who's to say the damage wasn't caused by the homeowner moving in?

The best way to manage your expectations is to ensure you are well versed in what the warranty covers because it is limited. The biggest disappointment I experience with homeowners is when they realize something they expected was not covered by the warranty. But they could easily have accessed this information themselves and adjusted their expectations accordingly.

Trust me, builders are not sitting around for months on end doing nothing by choice. Materials are still on backorder; manufacturers do not have enough to ship. This goes for everything from appliances, to hardwood, to tile, to pigment for paint! It is an unprecedented time we are going through as is everyone. Yes Tarion has extended deadline dates for repairs but they also extended deadline dates for homeowners to file their forms.

I can't speak for other builders but if I could get in the needed materials tomorrow, I would be finishing up every file. I have no reason to delay anything. The homeowners are rightfully upset and frustrated, and most builders (especially those in the Customer Service Departments), are exhausted as they are taking the brunt of the frustrations.
Deal Fanatic
Dec 20, 2018
6520 posts
5589 upvotes
it's not useless, a lot of provinces don't even have something similar and it's entirely upto homeowner to take developer to court

while not perfect and arguably tilted towards developers, it's still better than a lot of other jurisdictions where purchasers/owners are entirely on their own to fend for themselves for everything big or small

mark everything you see in your PDI and again in 30 days..at least it's documented and they will have to respond to it and even if don't agree to fix, they have to address it and then if you can't resolve, it costs them money to goto tarion arbitration
Deal Expert
Feb 29, 2008
17738 posts
15387 upvotes
Tarrana & The Ri…
ServiceRep wrote: Don't confuse the 30-day with the pdi. The pdi is the only record of note whereby damages will be covered by the warranty because they were obviously there prior to the homeowner taking possession. Damages to a hardwood floor reported on the 30-day form would not be covered because who's to say the damage wasn't caused by the homeowner moving in?

The best way to manage your expectations is to ensure you are well versed in what the warranty covers because it is limited. The biggest disappointment I experience with homeowners is when they realize something they expected was not covered by the warranty. But they could easily have accessed this information themselves and adjusted their expectations accordingly.

Trust me, builders are not sitting around for months on end doing nothing by choice. Materials are still on backorder; manufacturers do not have enough to ship. This goes for everything from appliances, to hardwood, to tile, to pigment for paint! It is an unprecedented time we are going through as is everyone. Yes Tarion has extended deadline dates for repairs but they also extended deadline dates for homeowners to file their forms.

I can't speak for other builders but if I could get in the needed materials tomorrow, I would be finishing up every file. I have no reason to delay anything. The homeowners are rightfully upset and frustrated, and most builders (especially those in the Customer Service Departments), are exhausted as they are taking the brunt of the frustrations.
As someone said, it depends on the builder. Yes, some do sit back and do nothing for a variety of reasons and one of them is hoping the purchaser will just go away. Yes, there are plenty of time where issues can't be dealt with due to issues outside of the builder's hands however plenty of cases the builder simply isn't doing enough or they're incompetent.

The deadline dates they pushed back was 2 weeks. Gave the builders MONTHS!

Tarion works I guess for competent builders like Tridel. Does not work for incompetent builders. It's too easy for them to skirt responsibility. COVID is certainly an issue for some things but not everything and this was a problem before COVID.
Deal Expert
Feb 29, 2008
17738 posts
15387 upvotes
Tarrana & The Ri…
StatsGuy wrote: it's not useless, a lot of provinces don't even have something similar and it's entirely upto homeowner to take developer to court

while not perfect and arguably tilted towards developers, it's still better than a lot of other jurisdictions where purchasers/owners are entirely on their own to fend for themselves for everything big or small

mark everything you see in your PDI and again in 30 days..at least it's documented and they will have to respond to it and even if don't agree to fix, they have to address it and then if you can't resolve, it costs them money to goto tarion arbitration
That's simply not good enough when a buyer is forced to pay for Tarion and go through the process with them when buying a home in Ontario. From what I've found, the bigger builders are pretty good at providing a completed unit at the time of possession. Any issues are dealt with quickly. The smaller ones it's really a toss up. I still se properties completed years ago with major exterior defficiencies. Builders just move on to the next project. I have purchased enough new construction to have a decent enough read on Tarion.

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