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Temporary virus jobs for P.Eng?

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  • Apr 18th, 2020 6:54 pm
[OP]
Sr. Member
Jun 19, 2007
780 posts
738 upvotes
Halifax

Temporary virus jobs for P.Eng?

I see lots of job ads and posters for things like grocery store clerks to help cope with the increased demand. But they don't really pay that well, and often have bad hours, and almost seems like a waste of a skill-set to have an engineer stocking shelves.

I haven't worked in about 2 years by choice, but seeing as I'm young and capable, I wouldn't mind helping out the cause for the good of society - but not for so long as I'd have to return to long term, ft work.

Has anyone seen or have any ideas for such sort of things for engineers? It always seemed like a big draw back that professional level jobs often had months long on-loading processes, just to get in the door, and another 1-6 months to get up to speed on whatever project.
23 replies
Deal Addict
Oct 16, 2013
2328 posts
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New Brunswick
Wait a minute, you don't like working leading to you not working for 2 years and now you want a professional engineering job? Lol, just lol.
Deal Guru
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Mar 23, 2008
12088 posts
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Edmonton
seadog83 wrote: I see lots of job ads and posters for things like grocery store clerks to help cope with the increased demand. But they don't really pay that well, and often have bad hours, and almost seems like a waste of a skill-set to have an engineer stocking shelves.

I haven't worked in about 2 years by choice, but seeing as I'm young and capable, I wouldn't mind helping out the cause for the good of society - but not for so long as I'd have to return to long term, ft work.

Has anyone seen or have any ideas for such sort of things for engineers? It always seemed like a big draw back that professional level jobs often had months long on-loading processes, just to get in the door, and another 1-6 months to get up to speed on whatever project.
I obviously have no idea about your skillset and experience, but I suspect there's a significant number of experienced and unemployed engineers left twiddling their thumbs right now. And I would suspect that will remain the case for the next little while, until companies begin "restarting", and projects start up again. Anyone who was in a "critical" role (a role that there is a value in filling right now) would have been retained while other employees are laid off/furloughed/etc.

There's still companies hiring. Companies that feel they have enough cash in the bank to keep moving forward, companies that had budgets already in place for projects that still need to get done regardless of a shutdown, etc. But there's lots more companies that shut down abruptly, and have people left unemployed.

Just my $0.02 worth...

C
[OP]
Sr. Member
Jun 19, 2007
780 posts
738 upvotes
Halifax
CNeufeld wrote: I obviously have no idea about your skillset and experience, but I suspect there's a significant number of experienced and unemployed engineers left twiddling their thumbs right now. And I would suspect that will remain the case for the next little while, until companies begin "restarting", and projects start up again. Anyone who was in a "critical" role (a role that there is a value in filling right now) would have been retained while other employees are laid off/furloughed/etc.

There's still companies hiring. Companies that feel they have enough cash in the bank to keep moving forward, companies that had budgets already in place for projects that still need to get done regardless of a shutdown, etc. But there's lots more companies that shut down abruptly, and have people left unemployed.

Just my $0.02 worth...

C
Yeah that's kind of what I figured. Not overly sold on working, more thought to help out where needed, as well as shoring up cash reserves to take advantage of cheap stocks. But just thought I'd throw the feelers out there to see if others had ideas, since you do hear of worker shortages, along side record unemployment. But the shortages are typically for those jobs like stock boy or farm worker, for whom the average Canadian can't be bothered to do, at the wage offered.
Deal Addict
Jun 11, 2016
1808 posts
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My initial thought was it wasn't right for anyone to downvote a thread about someone looking for work.
Now I understand....
seadog83 wrote: Not overly sold on working, more thought to help out where needed, as well as shoring up cash reserves to take advantage of cheap stocks.
Well that's a big FU to those who were laid off....

Cheers, KH
Deal Fanatic
Jul 13, 2012
7378 posts
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Ottawa
seadog83 wrote: Yeah that's kind of what I figured. Not overly sold on working, more thought to help out where needed, as well as shoring up cash reserves to take advantage of cheap stocks. But just thought I'd throw the feelers out there to see if others had ideas, since you do hear of worker shortages, along side record unemployment. But the shortages are typically for those jobs like stock boy or farm worker, for whom the average Canadian can't be bothered to do, at the wage offered.
You're "not overly sold on working"? What is your source of income?
Deal Addict
Sep 2, 2010
1765 posts
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Ontario
seadog83 wrote: seems like a waste of a skill-set to have an engineer stocking shelves."

Stocking shelves has gained a new credibility and honour.
Sr. Member
Nov 22, 2017
690 posts
405 upvotes
What kind of engineer are you? No one is hiring professionals at this time and even if they were those jobs aren't really "essential jobs that can help with the virus". The only thing i can think off is if you are some sort of biomedical/electrical engineer that could help with manufacturing medical equipment. But then again those companies have their own engineers on staff, unless you want to enter design competitions by DIY.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Jun 19, 2007
780 posts
738 upvotes
Halifax
ConsoleWatcher wrote: You're "not overly sold on working"? What is your source of income?
Did about 10 years oil/mining/field engineering type stuff in a lot of not so nice places, with no real schedule. The sorts of jobs where you get calls at 2am to hop on a plane at 5am, and you don't know how long you'll be gone, but that it will likely include at least a few 48 hour stints. Where time off for anything less than your wedding or immediate family member's funeral is a maybe.

You're paid very well, and you're saving like 90% of your income since you have no real expenses. After ~10 years of that invest it in index funds, and from dividends your basic expenses are basically covered for life.

I guess in a more broad sense, I was just curious if there was any way to grab a job to help out society since I hear and see all these calls for workers, but that would be more involved and interesting than unskilled labour.
Deal Fanatic
Jul 13, 2012
7378 posts
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Ottawa
seadog83 wrote: Did about 10 years oil/mining/field engineering type stuff in a lot of not so nice places, with no real schedule. The sorts of jobs where you get calls at 2am to hop on a plane at 5am, and you don't know how long you'll be gone, but that it will likely include at least a few 48 hour stints. Where time off for anything less than your wedding or immediate family member's funeral is a maybe.

You're paid very well, and you're saving like 90% of your income since you have no real expenses. After ~10 years of that invest it in index funds, and from dividends your basic expenses are basically covered for life.

I guess in a more broad sense, I was just curious if there was any way to grab a job to help out society since I hear and see all these calls for workers, but that would be more involved and interesting than unskilled labour.
Fair enough; by your early post it just sounded a bit like you were mooching off gov't benefits.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2011
35533 posts
21587 upvotes
Center of Universe
P.Eng in O&G, you should check out OPG.
Otherwise, we are always on the lookout for P.Eng with discipline in aerospace.
Deal Guru
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Jul 12, 2003
11563 posts
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Toronto
seadog83 wrote: Did about 10 years oil/mining/field engineering type stuff in a lot of not so nice places, with no real schedule. The sorts of jobs where you get calls at 2am to hop on a plane at 5am, and you don't know how long you'll be gone, but that it will likely include at least a few 48 hour stints. Where time off for anything less than your wedding or immediate family member's funeral is a maybe.

You're paid very well, and you're saving like 90% of your income since you have no real expenses. After ~10 years of that invest it in index funds, and from dividends your basic expenses are basically covered for life.

I guess in a more broad sense, I was just curious if there was any way to grab a job to help out society since I hear and see all these calls for workers, but that would be more involved and interesting than unskilled labour.
If you really want to help put the society, then work volunteer.

If doesn't matter who you are or your education level, if you chose to work in a Grocery Store, they pay you a wage for a grocery clerk and work with a schedule of the grocery store.
Retired Forum Moderator February 2009 - June 2015
[OP]
Sr. Member
Jun 19, 2007
780 posts
738 upvotes
Halifax
ConsoleWatcher wrote: Fair enough; by your early post it just sounded a bit like you were mooching off gov't benefits.
Why would you assume such a cynic's tack? I truly don't get the vitriol here. A semi-retired engineer, with experience in feet-on-the-ground field engineering and logistics wondering if there's a place he can be used to the benefit of society during a crisis, being lambasted because he's looking for short term work motivated more by altruism than finance. "What an ass! You should just stay at home collecting your divi cheques and drink beer". Are retired doctors and nurses who are considering coming out of retirement to help short term with the crisis equally ****?
eager beaver wrote: Stocking shelves has gained a new credibility and honour.
I'm certainly not saying I'm above it, more questioning if from a societal perspective if that's the best use of my skills. While its an exaggeration and I'm obviously not in the same league, it would be like a dr with skills in virology showing up at the hospital, and being told to mop up blood from the OR.
vkizzle wrote: P.Eng in O&G, you should check out OPG.
Otherwise, we are always on the lookout for P.Eng with discipline in aerospace.
Are these short term (3-12 mths) jobs that have a direct application to the current crisis? I'm not looking for permanent work, merely if there was a way to put my currently idle skill set to use to the benefit of society. Apparently it looks like it's not the case. I'm actually sorry I asked.
MP3_SKY wrote: If you really want to help put the society, then work volunteer.

If doesn't matter who you are or your education level, if you chose to work in a Grocery Store, they pay you a wage for a grocery clerk and work with a schedule of the grocery store.
I already volunteer fairly extensively with several groups, and am on the boards of two orgs. In fact just last night we were up late getting refurbished bikes set to go out to ppl who would otherwise have no transport given the job reductions, and impacts on reduced public transit.
Deal Fanatic
Jul 13, 2012
7378 posts
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Ottawa
seadog83 wrote: Why would you assume such a cynic's tack? I truly don't get the vitriol here. A semi-retired engineer, with experience in feet-on-the-ground field engineering and logistics wondering if there's a place he can be used to the benefit of society during a crisis, being lambasted because he's looking for short term work motivated more by altruism than finance. "What an ass! You should just stay at home collecting your divi cheques and drink beer". Are retired doctors and nurses who are considering coming out of retirement to help short term with the crisis equally ****?
As I said, I apologize. When you said that you were young and "not working by your own choice" it sounded like you were living off unemployment or other government benefits and didn't want to take a job you were overqualified for.
Sadly, it's something I see far too often.
If you're living on your own savings/investments that's a completely different thing.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2011
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seadog83 wrote: Why would you assume such a cynic's tack? I truly don't get the vitriol here. A semi-retired engineer, with experience in feet-on-the-ground field engineering and logistics wondering if there's a place he can be used to the benefit of society during a crisis, being lambasted because he's looking for short term work motivated more by altruism than finance. "What an ass! You should just stay at home collecting your divi cheques and drink beer". Are retired doctors and nurses who are considering coming out of retirement to help short term with the crisis equally ****?



I'm certainly not saying I'm above it, more questioning if from a societal perspective if that's the best use of my skills. While its an exaggeration and I'm obviously not in the same league, it would be like a dr with skills in virology showing up at the hospital, and being told to mop up blood from the OR.



Are these short term (3-12 mths) jobs that have a direct application to the current crisis? I'm not looking for permanent work, merely if there was a way to put my currently idle skill set to use to the benefit of society. Apparently it looks like it's not the case. I'm actually sorry I asked.



I already volunteer fairly extensively with several groups, and am on the boards of two orgs. In fact just last night we were up late getting refurbished bikes set to go out to ppl who would otherwise have no transport given the job reductions, and impacts on reduced public transit.
Unfortunately, nothing short term, as your education and experience would be best utilized in a long term project for sustainability on the many deficiencies that were exposed by this epedemic.

Volunteering at a food bank would help a lot of people that are in need right now.
Jr. Member
May 4, 2017
176 posts
312 upvotes
Either he's a lazy engineer or a disgruntled engineering student who flunked out of engineering school and became an oil rigger and a day trader. My guess is the latter because there's no way this guy is a P. Eng. lol
[OP]
Sr. Member
Jun 19, 2007
780 posts
738 upvotes
Halifax
divx wrote: How did you maintain your membership without working for 2 years?
Simply pay the $400 or so each year, and sign the non-practicing declaration which omits the professional development hours? Same way any other retired engineer, or one who's taking a break for whatever reason (kids, travel, school) maintains P.Eng status.
GoldenKnight wrote: Either he's a lazy engineer or a disgruntled engineering student who flunked out of engineering school and became an oil rigger and a day trader. My guess is the latter because there's no way this guy is a P. Eng. lol
You clearly have no idea what you're talking about. Money is in index funds, but regardless, why should a millionaire, successful day trader be frowned upon in any case? if a "dumb rigger" had the wherewithal to save their money and grow it, is that something to be chastened for? You expose far more of your own insecurities in such attacks, than undermining mine. And if that was the case, why would I be looking for, let alone qualified for P.Eng type jobs?
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Mar 23, 2008
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seadog83 wrote: Simply pay the $400 or so each year, and sign the non-practicing declaration which omits the professional development hours? Same way any other retired engineer, or one who's taking a break for whatever reason (kids, travel, school) maintains P.Eng status.



You clearly have no idea what you're talking about. Money is in index funds, but regardless, why should a millionaire, successful day trader be frowned upon in any case? if a "dumb rigger" had the wherewithal to save their money and grow it, is that something to be chastened for? You expose far more of your own insecurities in such attacks, than undermining mine. And if that was the case, why would I be looking for, let alone qualified for P.Eng type jobs?
I wouldn’t bother engaging those individuals who are disgruntled because they have to work... Not an argument you can win.

Back to your issue... The groups that are currently swamped/needing help are either the highly skilled (in a different area than your skill set) or “low skill”, which you don’t seem to want to jump in on (understandably).

But keep in mind that a significant number of the very large unemployment sector is in that mid to low skill level group as well. Restaurant workers, sales people, etc. Basically people who were part of the “non-essential” group. So even if you do want to help out, you may be taking a job from someone who isn’t doing it to help out, but to put food on the table.

C

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