Food & Drink

Thoughts on BREAD BOX?

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Sep 1, 2005
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Thoughts on BREAD BOX?

Way back in the day I recall ppl had bread boxes. Does anyone still use them? Don't you find it to be a countertop hog? How do they keep bread/rolls etc fresher for longer [do they, are they airtight]? What's wrong with just leaving them in the plastic bag/ziplock bag?
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Sep 26, 2008
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Are those things even sold anymore, other than perhaps Value Village or similar? My bread box is the freezer.
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Jenny1975 wrote: Are those things even sold anymore, other than perhaps Value Village or similar? My bread box is the freezer.
Yes they still sell them which is why I'm asking who still uses them?

https://www.amazon.ca/s?k=bread+box&cri ... _ss_i_3_14
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Feb 25, 2007
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waste of counter space, we got one as a house warming gift for our old house, we never used it, sat in the basement for number of years un-opened, then i gave it away (not as a house warming gift, person saw it in my basement and actually wanted it)
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gr8dlr wrote: Yes they still sell them which is why I'm asking who still uses them?

https://www.amazon.ca/s?k=bread+box&cri ... _ss_i_3_14
Wow, they leave the bread unwrapped and touching the box? No tx.

I'm w the other poster, my 'bread box' is the freezer also haha.
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tranquility922 wrote: Wow, they leave the bread unwrapped and touching the box? No tx.
Have you ever been to a real bakery? That's how it is on the rack or in the display case at the bakery. It would be your own box, with your bread in it.

For us, it's in a plastic bag on the counter or inside the microwave if it's consumed within the next day or the freezer if more than that.
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Jun 12, 2008
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People who make their own bread use them.
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May 28, 2012
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Saskatoon
I've seen a few bread boxes at Winners/HomeSense over the years. Brands were Joseph Joseph, Typhoon and Rig-Tig. I don't have enough counter space for one so I just use a rectangular woven plastic basket. What I'd really like to find is a reusable bag that's large enough to keep a whole loaf from my Zirojushi bread machine...I used to repurpose those clear bags in Costco's meat department for it but they've since switched to compostable and are no good for that purpose.

We gifted the in-laws with a custom made oak one many years ago but it would look pretty dated in a modern kitchen.
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my0gr81 wrote: Have you ever been to a real bakery? That's how it is on the rack or in the display case at the bakery. It would be your own box, with your bread in it.

For us, it's in a plastic bag on the counter or inside the microwave if it's consumed within the next day or the freezer if more than that.
Ofc, but we're talking about our reg homes, so I guess you can do that for your own homebaked stuff since obviously doesn't have any pkging, but store-bought stuff it's counterproductive me thinks.
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gr8dlr wrote: What's wrong with just leaving them in the plastic bag/ziplock bag?
Might sweat, leading to mould.
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Mar 11, 2004
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Fresh baked bread will keep fresh and crisp in them for 3-4 days. After that it becomes hard and stale and gets processed into bread crumbs. Repeat next week.
Or... if you are like me and single, bake bread, let it cool, slice it up and into the freezer she goes.
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tranquility922 wrote: Ofc, but we're talking about our reg homes, so I guess you can do that for your own homebaked stuff since obviously doesn't have any pkging, but store-bought stuff it's counterproductive me thinks.
Even fresh bread from the bakery or in the paper bag at the grocery store is best stored in a bread box at home, if you have one. If not, it goes in a plastic bag and frozen, or stays in the paper bag and stored in the microwave.
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my0gr81 wrote: Even fresh bread from the bakery or in the paper bag at the grocery store is best stored in a bread box at home, if you have one. If not, it goes in a plastic bag and frozen, or stays in the paper bag and stored in the microwave.
I assume it doesn't hurt to put it in the bread box, but does one really take store-bought bakery goods out of its packaging before doing so? I'm more concerned about insects/dust/etc vs whatever marginal preservation benefits of the bread box.
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tranquility922 wrote: I assume it doesn't hurt to put it in the bread box, but does one really take store-bought bakery goods out of its packaging before doing so? I'm more concerned about insects/dust/etc vs whatever marginal preservation benefits of the bread box.
If you are concerned with insects/dust/etc, then yes you need to plastic bag it. In general, it's not a first world issue, for us.
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my0gr81 wrote: If you are concerned with insects/dust/etc, then yes you need to plastic bag it. In general, it's not a first world issue, for us.
I know, just feels weird to have bakery exposed touching things. I can't be bothered and probably why these things were rendered out of style/use.
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tranquility922 wrote: I know, just feels weird to have bakery exposed touching things. I can't be bothered and probably why these things were rendered out of style/use.
There is nothing weird about it, it is the real world. It had nothing to do with exposed surfaces of the bread box, touching the bread. Bread boxes as they were, have been rendered out of use due to countless other storage options that are not uni-taskers taking up counter space. That is why they are now mostly out of style.

Even in high volume commercial bakeries, the bread touches the preparation surfaces, baking, cooling and blades in equipment that slices them before being packaged in the plastic bags. Believe me, if you have been in a commercial bakery, there are more chances of insects and dust in that environment than you imagine.

Here is the FDA allowed "defects" that can be in the Wheat flour that makes up most of the bread (note that a cup of flour is about 150g):
Wheat Flour

Insect filth
(AOAC 972.32) Average of 75 or more insect fragments per 50 grams

Rodent filth
(AOAC 972.32) Average of 1 or more rodent hairs per 50 grams

DEFECT SOURCE: Insect fragments - preharvest and/or post harvest and/or processing insect infestation, Rodent hair - post harvest and/or processing contamination with animal hair or excreta.
SIGNIFICANCE: Aesthetic

Source: https://www.fda.gov/food/ingredients-ad ... s-handbook
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my0gr81 wrote: There is nothing weird about it, it is the real world. It had nothing to do with exposed surfaces of the bread box, touching the bread. Bread boxes as they were, have been rendered out of use due to countless other storage options that are not uni-taskers taking up counter space. That is why they are now mostly out of style.

Even in high volume commercial bakeries, the bread touches the preparation surfaces, baking, cooling and blades in equipment that slices them before being packaged in the plastic bags. Believe me, if you have been in a commercial bakery, there are more chances of insects and dust in that environment than you imagine.

Here is the FDA allowed "defects" that can be in the Wheat flour that makes up most of the bread (note that a cup of flour is about 150g):
Wheat Flour

Insect filth
(AOAC 972.32) Average of 75 or more insect fragments per 50 grams

Rodent filth
(AOAC 972.32) Average of 1 or more rodent hairs per 50 grams

DEFECT SOURCE: Insect fragments - preharvest and/or post harvest and/or processing insect infestation, Rodent hair - post harvest and/or processing contamination with animal hair or excreta.
SIGNIFICANCE: Aesthetic

Source: https://www.fda.gov/food/ingredients-ad ... s-handbook
Dude, it's weird to me having baked goods coming from store in pkging, *taking them out* and putting in bread box...it's counterintuitive/productive IMO. Again, we're not talking about commercial enterprises, not sure why you're writing an essay on that. The OP is obviously asking about HOME applications.

Anyway, a quick Google seems to show that bread boxes are not very useful nowadays as many stuff come w preservatives. I guess if one has foods that don't contain those, go for it.
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Since this is a quasi bread connoisseurs thread do you guys who bake your own have a reserve of dough? I imagine you have an all purpose dough recipe for pizza, breads, etc but keeping it in the fridge is both a space consideration. I want to make batches for rolls, baguettes and of course pizzas but want a way to keep them at the ready when I need it. Few things in this world rivals the divinity of fresh bread especially baguettes.
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Supercooled wrote: Since this is a quasi bread connoisseurs thread do you guys who bake your own have a reserve of dough? I imagine you have an all purpose dough recipe for pizza, breads, etc but keeping it in the fridge is both a space consideration. I want to make batches for rolls, baguettes and of course pizzas but want a way to keep them at the ready when I need it. Few things in this world rivals the divinity of fresh bread especially baguettes.
You can always make large batch of dough, portion and freeze that and take out as needed to bake a fresh loaf. Or keep in the fridge and bake as needed. I usually do this with artisan bread where I dont want to bake it all at once. It actually develops more flavour the longer it sits in the fridge.

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